Fall 2017 Extraordinary Firearms Auction
Grosses Over $15.1 Million

Auction: October 31, November 1 & 2, 2017: 10am

Preview: October 30, 2017: 9am - 7pm and October 31: 7am - 10am | November 1 & 2: 8am - 10am

Please Note: All prices include the hammer price plus the buyer’s premium, which is paid by the buyer as part of the purchase price. The prices noted here after the auction are considered unofficial and do not become official until after the 46th day.

If you have questions please email firearms@jamesdjulia.com.




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1007
$28,175.00
Revised: 10/25/2017

Please Note: This is a 2nd model, not a 1st model.

RARE HENRY 1860 1ST MODEL LEVER ACTION RIFLE.

SN 428. Cal 44 RF HENRY. Standard Henry rifle with 24-1/4″ oct bbl that has integral magazine, early style rounded German silver front sight, no provision for a rear sight on the bbl with a dovetail in top flat of receiver containing a 1st type 1,000 yard Henry ladder rear sight without slide retaining screw. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock and 1st type buttplate with round heel and large trap to accommodate the accompanying 4-pc hickory & steel wiping rod. The 2 buttplate screws and 3 tang screws are all matching numbered to this rifle. Serial number was observed on top bbl flat at the receiver, left side of the lower tang under the wood, inside top tang channel of buttstock and inside buttplate tang. Round portion of the bbl, under the loading sleeve is marked with the assembly # 20 with matching assembly number on rear face of loading sleeve. It should be noted that although the sideplate coloration is different from the receiver & buttplate this is not an unusual occurrence with Henry rifles. This cataloger has noted several such occurrence and one is even pictured with non-matching colors on page 50 of The Henry Rifle, Quick. In actuality the coloration of the receiver & sideplates on that rifle, SN 346 very closely matches the coloration on this rifle. Accompanied by a 3-page and another 2-page letter from Kurt Saxon authenticating this rifle and its original hickory cleaning rod, and stating most of the above information. Kurt is listed in the acknowledgements section as a contributing resource on page 14 of Les Quick’s Henry book. This rifle exhibits all the early features of a Henry rifle including the rounded front sight, small font address, 1,000 yard ladder rear sight, sharp radius at rear of receiver, small magazine follower tab with no rebate for the tab, slight perchbelly stock and buttplate with round heel & large trap with corresponding large hole in the wood. These early rifles produced at the very start of the Civil War almost undoubtedly saw hard service throughout the war and later on the American frontier. Rarely are they found today in orig configuration with any orig finish. This Henry is the gun that inspired the cover theme magazine article for the Fall 2012 The Winchester Collector, “What’s in a Number” and the article titled, “The Cube Root of ‘8’ Equals ‘2’, Why Numbers are Important to Gun Nuts,” which dealt with the Firearms fraternity’s fascination with firearms SN’s. On page 16 is the associated cover article discussing this serial number 428 and also showing a picture of the serial number and top of the barrel and receiver of this Henry on page 17. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Bbl & magazine retain a dark brown patina with some thinning on the magazine tube about mid-point with possibly some old touch-up. Receiver & sideplates show light to moderate wear with receiver retaining a mottled dark mustard patina and the sideplates a smooth dark bronze patina. Buttplate is a matching mottled patina. Stock is sound with light nicks, dings & scratches and retains most finish. Mechanics are crisp, strong bright bore with good shine and scattered light pitting. 52330-1 (27,500-35,000) – Lot 1007

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1009
$0.00
Revised: 10/31/2017

Please Note: Additional Information: This extraordinary rifle was awarded silver medal #442 at the annual NRA show in Milwaukee, WI, 2006. The medal & certificate accompany this lot.

EXTREMELY RARE WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 LEVER ACTION RIFLE ENGRAVED IN HIGH RELIEF BY JOHN ULRICH AND DISPLAYED AT THE 1876 PHILADELPHIA WORLD EXPOSITION.

SN 104468. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Extraordinarily beautiful example of the engraver’s art, this rifle has 24-1/4″ oct bbl, full magazine, Rocky Mountain front sight and 900 yd. Henry ladder rear sight. Mounted with uncheckered, nicely figured, about 3X shell grain buttstock and flame grain forearm with straight stock and crescent buttplate. Right side of buttstock is inlaid with small German silver bowtie-shaped plaque. Bottom of stock and forend cap have factory sling swivels. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked “V / XXXX”. Top tang channel of buttstock is marked with spurious matching SN and inside toe of buttplate with orig matching SN. Trigger is of the narrow, pointed-toe style often found on special 1866 rifles. Receiver, forend cap and buttplate are gold washed. The rifle is incredibly engraved with absolutely full coverage. Relief engraving art by John Ulrich featuring a total of seven panels all surrounded by intricate, intertwined foliate arabesque patterns that have extremely fine pearled backgrounds. Left sideplate is engraved with the large deep relief round vignette of a bugling bull elk set in an extremely detailed forest scene. Forward of that panel is the small round vignette of a flying waterfowl over a marsh scene. On the left rear side is the small vignette of a running fox in a field scene. Left front flat is engraved with the large vignette of a deep relief regal bull elk in a detailed forest scene. Right sideplate is also engraved with the large round vignette in deep relief depicting a bull elk in a detailed forest scene. The right front side flat has the large vignette of a deep relief engraved skulking mountain lion and the right rear of the frame has the small vignette of a squirrel on a limb surrounded by foliate patterns. Remainder of receiver, sideplates, top and bottom tangs are covered in semi-relief foliate arabesque patterns with various small open accent panels. Forend cap and buttplate tang are engraved to match. This rifle was manufactured in about 1872 and was believed to have been part of the factory sample collection which was exhibited at the 1876 Philadelphia World Exposition. This rifle is very similar to SN 104463, which is pictured, both sides on pg. 146 of Winchester Engraving, Wilson with much of the same themes and the panels and nearly identical engraving patterns. PROVENANCE: Prestigious and lifetime Parker and Winchester collection of Dr. Tom Bouwkamp. CONDITION: Very good. Bbl and magazine tube retain a smooth blue brown patina with stronger blue in sheltered areas. Bbl has a few spots of blood pitting toward the muzzle. Receiver has been polished a long time ago, which removed some of the shading in the background of the larger vignettes. Edges of receiver and sideplates show light to moderate wear and overall shows traces of orig gold wash. Buttplate and forend cap are a medium to dark mustard patina which matches the patina of the receiver. Hammer retains strong case colors, bright in sheltered areas. Lever is a brown patina with fine pitting. The replacement buttstock has a repaired chip in the toe with some light wood filler and a few grain checks on right side. Otherwise wood is sound and retains an old refinish. Mechanics are fine. Bright shiny bore. 52170-29 (100,000-150,000) – Lot 1009

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1026
$0.00
Revised: 10/13/2017

Please Note: At one time there was a bulge in the barrel near the magazine retaining band which has been professionally restored.

*EXTRAORDINARILY RARE AND PROBABLY THE HIGHEST CONDITION 1ST TYPE WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 1 OF 1000 LEVER ACTION RIFLES WITH NUMERIC 1 OF 1000 DESIGNATION ACCOMPANIED BY ITS ORIGINAL UNIVERSAL STUDIOS PRIZE ’94 CARBINE WITH FACTORY LETTER.

1) WINCHESTER 1873 1 of 1000. SN 6594. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Certainly one of the best known and one of the highest condition Model 1 of 1000 Winchester rifles extant. This rifle has absolutely documented history from 1935 to the present day having been purchased from the Iver Johnson Sporting Goods Co. in Boston by renowned old-time collector, the late Fred F.P. Mills who kept it until his death in 1962. The rifle passed through a number of equally renowned collections, all listed below under provenance. This rifle has 24-1/4″ oct bbl, full magazine, gold washed Beach’s combination front sight, early style, short semi-buckhorn rear sight with V-notch & checkered edges & a thick base sporting tang sight with 4″ staff and early style thumb screw with fine knurled edge. Top flat of the bbl has the 2-line Winchester & King’s address & patents forward of the rear sight and “1 of 1000” engraved over the chamber area. Receiver is first type with mortised dust cover rails containing a 2nd type dust cover with impressed checkered thumbprint. Receiver also has single set trigger. Mounted with extraordinary, highly figured, flame grain, about 3-4X American walnut with H-style checkered forearm and black insert serpentine grip buttstock with smooth steel shotgun buttplate. Left side of the lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “394” & “XXX”. Matching assembly no. is also found inside top tang channel of buttstock. Bottom of the stock & forend cap are fitted with factory sling swivels. Inside each sideplate is numbered “594”, obviously an assemblers mistake. The left side of the lever, inside the action is numbered “5561” also apparently an assembly or serial number. At the time of manufacture of this rifle, 1875, very few pistol grip 1873 arms were being produced. Since they required a special curved lever to accommodate the pistol grip stock they were apparently numbered to an order. This rifle was featured as item # 688 in the Jackson Arms catalog #22 of 1965 and is pictured on the back cover. This rifle was one of the first twenty 1 of 1000 rifles identified to Universal Studios in 1950 when they were doing publicity for their upcoming Jimmy Stewart movie Winchester ’73 and awarded each of those first 20 rifle owners with a new Winchester Model ’94 carbine. The carbine that was awarded to Mr. Mills at that time, serial # 1674643 accompanies this rifle. Very few of those modern ’94 carbines remain with their original 1 of 1000 rifles today, possibly only 2 or 3. This rifle has been the subject of articles in various publications over the years and is accompanied by a large volume of provenance and correspondence including several letters from renowned historian, author and dealer, the late Eric Vaule to the current consignor. Also accompanying is a copy of a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this rifle with oct bbl, set trigger, XXX checkered stock, Peep & Beach sights, sling & swivel, case hardened, One of One Thousand, received in the warehouse July 30, 1875 and shipped the same day to order no. 3745. Additionally accompanied by a 3-page letter from renowned author, researcher and historian, the late R.L. Wilson who details some of the above information and discusses where this rifle will appear in his forthcoming publications. Also accompanying is a copy of a letter from Steve Hannagan to Olin Industries discussing Model 1 of 1000 rifles and stating that out of a total production of 720,610 Model 1873 arms there were only 135 produced as 1 of 1000. Additionally accompanying is a hand written note over the signature of renowned collector, the late Eldon J. Owens of Claremont, NH, wherein he states that he purchased both of these rifles, identified by SN, from the Fred Mills estate. Further accompanied by old black & white photos of Mr. Mills and another gentlemen holding this rifle. Finally accompanied by a 6-1/2 page, on legal sized paper listing of the Frederick P.L. Mills Firearms collection, this rifle is item # 68 on that list. This rifle is pictured in color on pages 31-32 of The Story of Winchester 1 of 1000 and 1 of 100 Rifles, Lewis. A deluxe slip-cover copy of this publication accompanies this rifle. It is also mentioned on page 65 of Winchester the Golden Age of Gunmaking and the Winchester 1 of 1000, Wilson. This is one of the more important and best documented 1 of 1000 rifles to come to market in recent history and certainly one of the most high conditioned rifles. PROVENANCE: Iver Johnson Sporting Goods – 1935; Fred P. L. Mills – 1935-1962; Eldon Owens – 1962; Jackson Arms – 1965; Bobby C. Burns – 1965-1993; Paul Sorrell & Mike Clark – 1993; David Bichrist – 1993; Leon Budginas- 1993; Jack Lewis, Jr. – 1996; Leigh Evans; Eric Vaule – 2003; Bert Jolicoeur – 2004. CONDITION: Very fine, numbers as noted above. Bbl retains about 80% strong orig blue with the balance a medium brown patina, all toward the muzzle. Magazine tube retains about the same amount of blue, also turned brown at the muzzle end. Both magazine tube & bbl have a few small scattered spots of pitting. Receiver, side plates & dust cover retain about 80% orig case colors, strong & bright in sheltered areas faded elsewhere, turned silver over the receiver ring & bottom front edge. Hammer retains strong case colors, turned gray on the spur. Lever retains case colors in sheltered areas, mostly turned gray/brown. Forend cap retains most of its orig case colors, moderately to heavily faded. Buttplate is a cleaned metal patina with fine pitting. Wood is sound with a few light handling & storage nicks & scratches and retains most of a fine old restored finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore with a few scattered spots of pitting. Tang sight is mostly a blue/brown patina. 2) WINCHESTER 94. SN 1674643. Original Universal Studios prize ’94 carbine. CONDITION: Carbine is extremely fine, appears to be unfired retaining virtually all of its orig factory finish with a few minor scratches on the wood and a couple more on the receiver. Sight hood is missing. 52651-1, 52651-4 JRL (250,000-400,000) – Lot 1026

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1028
$69,000.00
Revised: 10/20/2017

Please Note: Stock assembly number different font than those on bottom tang & inside butt plate.

VERY RARE WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 ONE OF ONE THOUSAND LEVER ACTION RIFLE.

SN 31266. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Fine one of one thousand with 24-1/4″ oct bbl, full magazine, gold-washed Beach’s combination front sight and early style, short, semi-buckhorn rear sight with fine V-notch. Receiver is 2nd type with attached dust cover rail and 3rd type dust cover with impressed checkered thumb-print. Receiver has single set trigger. Mounted with very nicely figured American walnut with early style checkered forearm and straight stock with crescent buttplate that has a trap. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “137” and “XX”. Matching assembly no. is also found in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. This rifle is beautifully engraved in 1 of 1000 fourth-style with fine foliate arabesque patterns over the top 3 flats of the bbl over the chamber area and around the front sight at the muzzle. Light flourishes of matching engraving are on the side flats over the chamber area and extend completely around the exposed flats of the muzzle. Chamber end & muzzle ends of the bbl are inlaid with platinum bands. Top flat of the bbl, over the chamber is engraved “One of One Thousand”. Accompanied by a copy of a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this rifle with 24″ oct bbl, set trigger, checkered stock, case hardened and 1 of 1000, received in warehouse Nov. 14, 1878 and shipped Nov. 20, 1878 with 5 other arms to order #13488. This rifle is listed by serial number on page 26 of The Story of the Winchester 1 of 1000 and 1 of 100 Rifles, Lewis. This rifle was the first number of 6 consecutively numbered 1 of 1000 rifles received in the warehouse Nov. 14, 1878 and shipped Nov. 20, 1878 to order no. 13488. This listing shows that it had an oct bbl, case hardened receiver with checkered stock and set trigger. Apparently it was not available to the author for photography at the time of publication. Three rifles of that shipment are pictured on pages 93 & 94 of Winchester the Golden Age of American Gunmaking and the Winchester 1 of 1000, Wilson. Captions of some of those photographs provide the same information about the shipment of 6 consecutive numbered Winchester 1 of 1000 rifles. While the Winchester Model 1873 was produced in large numbers, approximately 720,000, only 132 are recorded as being 1 of 1000. Of that number only a small percentage is known making this one of the more rare collectible American firearms in the world today. CONDITION: About good, all matching, lower tang having been period repaired and renumbered. Traces of orig finish remain in the most sheltered areas with the metal, overall, showing a smooth, even plum brown patina with a couple of minor nicks on the bbl. Receiver & sideplates show sharp edges indicating light use and handling. Forearm has a couple of repaired areas by the bbl channel on each side and a longitudinal hairline down the bottom, otherwise the wood is sound and overall retains a fine old restored finish with a few nicks, scratches & dings. Checkering shows moderate to heavy wear. Edges of the stock around the top & bottom tangs were reduced during the restoration process. Mechanics are fine, bright shiny bore with a few small spots of fine pitting. 52692-1 JRL (30,000-50,000) – Lot 1028

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1139
$16,100.00
Revised: 10/26/2017

Please Note: Cylinder number has been re-struck.

OUTSTANDING RARE EARLY EXHIBITION QUALITY ENGRAVED COLT MODEL 1851 PERCUSSION REVOLVER.

SN 5597. Cal. 36. 7-1/2″ bbl. Rare dovetail front sight with bead and 1-line New York City address. Left side of frame is engraved “COLT’S PATENT” in an unusual postion. The silver plated brass trigger guard and backstrap contains a beautifully figured burl walnut with varnished 1-pc grip with last three digits of SN in backstrap channel. Revolver is engraved with full coverage foliate arabesque pattern with a small cross-hatched panel on each side all with shaded background. Engraving extends over bbl lug and onto rammer pivot with a fine border over the muzzle. Hammer is engraved to match. Backstrap, butt strap and trigger guard are also engraved to match. All screwheads are lightly engraved in matching patterns. Cylinder is usual 6-shot with Ormsby naval battle scene and five of the safety pins are mostly serviceable. These fancifully embellished Colt firearms have frequently been attributed to The Crystal Palace Exhibition of 1851. Based upon the production date, this could well be a distinct possibility. CONDITION: Very fine as bbl retains about 80% glossy blue with sharp edge wear and light flaking. Rammer retains faded case colors in sheltered areas. Balance has somewhat turned silver. Frame and hammer are a mostly grey metal color. Cylinder is clean, grey metal color with a few prominent scratches and retains overall 60-70% of the Ormsby naval battle scene. Trigger guard retains most all of its silver finish as backstrap retains over 50% of its silver. Grip
is very fine and retains most of its crisp deluxe varnish. Mechanics are crisp. All visible numbers have been found to be matching. Bore is very good with strong rifling and slight spotting from age. This is truly an exceptional example of Colt’s artistry. 52705-3 TDW (15,000-25,000) – Lot 1139

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1140
$10,925.00
Revised: 10/13/2017

Please Note: The backstrap and trigger guard have been silver plated.

VERY RARE EARLY COLT 2ND MODEL SQUAREBACK 1851 NAVY PERCUSSION REVOLVER.

SN 937. Cal 36. Blue and color case hardened with 7-1/2″ oct bbl, brass pin front sight and 1-line block letter New York City address with dashes. Left side of frame has tiny “COLT’S PATENT”. Cylinder has usual 6 shots with Ormsby naval battle scene. The silver plated square back, small guard brass trigger guard and backstrap contain a 1-pc walnut grip with matching SN in the backstrap channel. Only about 3,000 of these rare revolvers were produced with the earliest SN noted by Swayze in 51 Colt Navies being 848 though first models with notched arbors still occur up to about 1250 serial range where the remainder of production to about SN 4000 are all second model configuration with slotted arbor (base pin). This gun features all the other early features including the thin profile grips, rammer screw entering from right side and small sgl inspector letter on trigger guard below SN. The very early revolvers, such as this one, are rarely ever found with any orig finish and this particular example is no doubt among the very finest. PROVENANCE: Ex-Norm Flayderman Estate Collection; Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching including rammer handle, cylinder and grip other then wedge which is numbered 822. Bbl and cylinder retain 90-95% orig bright blue, with sharp edge wear with areas of staining, pinprick pitting, scattered scratches, screws retain most of their fire blue. Ormsby rolled naval battle scene is fully discernible and crisp with scattered blemishes. Rammer & handle are bright/gray and show no case color. SN is stamped width-wise on the forward portion of lever which is unique to these early 3-digit Colts. Frame and hammer retain muted case colors with the balance silver/gray. Case colors of this era were notoriously light and dull. Grip is sound, well fit with a few small nicks & retains virtually all orig varnish with very light sharp edge wear. Mechanics are fine, crisp well defined bore with scattered spots of pitting. This is truly an exceptional early 2nd model ’51 Navy that would be very difficult to upgrade. 52328-3 (6,000-8,500) – Lot 1140

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1145
$9,200.00
Revised: 10/17/2017

Please Note: Army size grip not navy size.

VERY RARE FIRST YEAR PRODUCTION COLT MODEL 1860 FLUTED ARMY PERCUSSION REVOLVER WITH 7-1/2″ BARREL AND NAVY SIZE GRIP WITH FACTORY LETTER.

SN 1521. Cal. 44 PERCUSSION. Very rare Colt 1860 Army with 7-1/2″ rnd bbl, German silver front sight & 1-line block letter Hartford address. Left side of frame has tiny “COLTS PATENT”. Frame is rare 4 screw-type, cut for shoulder stock with flat head hammer screw and extended stock yolk screws. Cylinder is rebated with full flutes and 6 chambers marked on the outside with the SN in one flute and patent date in another. Five of the six safety pins are serviceable. The silver-plated brass trigger guard & iron backstrap are Navy sized and contain a 1-pc walnut grip with matching SN in backstrap channel. According to The Book of Colt Firearms, Wilson, out of the more than 200,000 Model 1860 Army revolvers produced 1860-1873 fewer than 4,000 had fluted cylinders with the vast majority of those under serial number 8,000. Given that this revolver was produced in early 1861, just at the outset of the Civil War and it is well documented that several shipments of Model 1860 revolvers were shipped to Southern dealers. These early fluted Army revolvers are considered secondary Confederate arms. Accompanied by a Colt Factory letter which identifies this revolver in caliber 44 with 7-1/2″ bbl, blue finish and wood stocks, shipped to the Colt New York office on Feb. 19,1861 in a 50 gun shipment. Since the Civil War did not officially commence until April 1861 and given the size of this shipment it seems likely that this revolver would have probably gone to the Confederacy. CONDITION: Very good to fine, all matching including wedge, cylinder & grip. Bbl retains traces of blue in sheltered areas being an overall smooth even blue/brown patina with rammer & handle matching patina. Frame retains very bright case colors on the sides, turning a little dark on the recoil shields and fading on the front left edge. Hammer retains about 60-70% equally bright case colors turned brown with light pitting on the nose and top edge. Cylinder retains thin blue in the flutes with a light blue/brown patina on the outer diameter. Trigger guard retains about 97-98% strong orig silver with a series of fine nicks on the trigger bow. Backstrap retains about 70% bubbly orig silver and the buttstrap about 90%. Grip shows heavy edge wear with usual light nicks & scratches and retains most of a fine restored varnish finish. Mechanics are fine, bright shiny bore with a few scattered spots of pitting. 52705-5 JRL (7,500-12,500) – Lot 1145

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1155
$0.00
Revised: 10/17/2017

Please Note: This revolver is a Richards-Mason conversion of the 1860 Army, not a 1871/72 open top revolver as stated in the catalog.

SCARCE COLT MODEL 1871/72 OPEN TOP SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER IDENTIFIED TO A MAN WANTED FOR MURDER.

SN 6923. Cal. 44 Colt. Usual configuration with 8″ rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left side of frame has 2-line patent dates and left shoulder trigger guard is marked “44 CAL”. Cylinder is usual rebated style with re-rolled Ormsby naval battle scene marking. SNs on the bbl, frame, trigger guard and buttstrap are all matching which last 3 digits of matching number on the cylinder. Backstrap channel of the grip has a coating of dark dried oil with obscures any numbers present. Mounted with varnished 1-pc walnut grip that has had both toes replaced. Revolver has been cleaned with the appearance of having been on a wire wheel. There were about 7,000 of these revolvers produced 1872-1873. Accompanied by a letter bearing the signature of George F. White, US Marshal, Southern District of Georgia, dated February 5, 1913. This letter states in effect that this revolver was taken from the body of L. L. Williams who was being served papers by Mr. White. Apparently Mr. Williams resisted arrest and was killed by Deputy US Marshal J.A. Kelly. CONDITION: Fair to good, all matching except grip as noted above. No orig finish remains being an overall cleaned, bright metal finish with fine pitting. Grip, with its repaired toes is otherwise sound showing light to moderate edge wear and retains most of its bright, custom varnish finish. Wedge appears to be an un-numbered replacement and the wedge screw is battered. Ejector rod head is a replacement. Mechanics are fine, strong dark bore. 52487-1 JRL (3,500-5,000) – Lot 1155

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1156
$3,450.00
Revised: 10/26/2017

Please Note: Barrel has been professionally stretched.

COLT MODEL 1871/72 OPEN TOP SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER.

SN 3108. Cal. 44RF Henry. Blue and color case hardened with 7-1/2″ rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line New-York U.S. America address with dashes and an integral rear sight at the forcing cone end of the bbl. Right side of bbl lug is mounted with an ejector rod housing with bull’s eye ejector rod head. Left side of frame has 2-line patent dates and hammer has firing pin attached with two rivets to left side of hammer nose. Blued steel trigger guard & back strap contain a 1-pc walnut grip. Only about 7,000 of these rare revolvers were produced in the period 1872-73. This predecessor of the venerable single action army, although a fine revolver in its own right, never gained strong popularity in the U.S. because the cartridge revolvers had already emerged on the scene making the rimfire cartridge obsolete. The majority of these revolvers were sold into Mexico and Latin America where the 44RF Henry cartridge was still popular and in extensive use. They are rarely found in orig configuration with any orig finish at all given their rough frontier service under extremely harsh conditions with little or no maintenance. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very fine. Overall retains about all of a fine professionally restored finish of the highest quality with high polish brilliant blues and strong bright case colors. Grip is equally new with one or two minor nicks. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52328-22 (3,500-4,500) – Lot 1156

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1195
$27,600.00
Revised: 10/20/2017

Please Note: Great News! A factory letter accompanies this item.

*EXCEPTIONAL CONSECUTIVE NUMBERED PAIR OF COLT STOREKEEPER MODEL SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVERS CATTLE BRAND ENGRAVED AND INLAID WITH SILVER BY COLT MASTER ENGRAVER GEORGE SPRING.

SN SA65254/SA65255. Cal. 45 COLT. Revolvers are as nearly as possible precisely identical. They are 3rd generation storekeeper’s model with 2-line address on their 4″ bbls. They have full front sights that have been slightly thinned during the engraving & finishing process. They are full blue finish with 100% coverage, fantastic silver inlaid cattle brands in the tradition of Cole Agee and his successor, Weldon Bledsoe. The entire surrounding surfaces are beautifully pearled except for fine artistic borders and in the flutes of the cylinder. Front straps & trigger plates are likewise not engraved and neither are the hammers. They are mounted with fleur-de-lis & diamond checkered 2-pc ivory grips that are matching numbered to the revolvers. Left side of buttstraps under the grips are engraved “SPRING”, the signature of George Spring, Colt Master Engraver for many years who was at one time in charge of the engraving department. Accompanied by a Colt custom shop oak display case that has gray velvet lining, compartmented in the bottom for both revolvers, with working key. CONDITION: Revolvers are exactly identical in condition. Both appear to be new & unfired, possibly unturned. Grips are equally new with a light ivory patina. Case is equally new. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. 52543-1 JRL (15,000-25,000) ESA – Lot 1195

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1210
$5,750.00
Revised: 10/31/2017

Please Note: The barrel length is 8-3/4″, not the rare 8-3/8.

*RARE SMITH & WESSON PRE-WWII REGISTERED MAGNUM DA REVOLVER WITH FACTORY LETTER.

SN 47143/REG NO. 671. Cal. 357 Magnum. Blue finish with 8-3/8″ ribbed bbl, Partridge front sight and adjustable rear sight. The rib and top strap of the frame are beautifully checkered. Hammer spur has very fine checkering with serrations on both sides. Mounted with Smith & Wesson large silver medallion diamond checkered walnut grips. Grips are un-numbered, but fit perfectly and are undoubtedly orig to this revolver. Grip frame is mounted with factory grip adapter with hard rubber insert back of the trigger guard. Trigger is standard with full length serrations. Accompanied by a Smith & Wesson factory letter which identifies this revolver with blue finish, 8-3/8″ bbl, Partridge front sight and was sold with factory grip adapter. It was shipped December 23, 1935 to the Frank P. Hall Company, Columbus, OH in a one gun shipment. Bbl and frame have standard markings. PROVENANCE: The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching including bbl and cylinder except grip, as noted above. Overall revolver retains 98-99% orig glossy factory blue with only faint muzzle edge wear and a fine cylinder line. Hammer and trigger both retain virtually all of their orig factory case colors. Grips are crisp showing virtually no wear and retain about all of their orig factory finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore, has been fired but very little 52328-41 JRL (7,500-10,000) C&R – Lot 1210

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1242
$9,200.00
Revised: 10/17/2017

Please Note: This is a Model 1863, not 1853.

HISTORICALLY DOCUMENTED SHARPS 1853/68 CONVERSION ISSUED TO 7TH INDIANA CAVALRYMAN JOSEPH BLACKBURN, ONE OF THE LUCKIEST SURVIVORS OF THE CIVIL WAR.

SN C14097. Cal. 50-70 Gov. 22″ traditional carbine bbl. 2-pc walnut stocks with sling bar on left side with faint patent markings on left side of receiver with lockplate marked “C.SHARPS.PAT.OCTOBER 5 1852”. Forearm retained by sgl band and spring retainer. Open rear sight dovetail with plugged screwhole. Documented by U.S. National Archives records search to have been issued to Pvt. Joseph Blackburn, whom had enlisted 8-17-1862 and been assigned to Company E, 89th Indiana Infantry. With further documentation also recovered from the National Archives that fully encompassed Pvt. Blackburn’s military record and application for disability and later for death benefits for his bereaved wife and children. Joseph Blackburn, while serving with the 89th Indiana Infantry, was captured by Southern forces in September 1862 in Mumfordville, Kentucky, was paroled and sent back to Indiana, re-enlisting after his parole and assigned to the 7th Indiana Cavalry Company E on September of 1863 and was issued Sharps carbine C14097. Again captured by Southern forces in a Cavalry skirmish on the Holly Ford Road near Memphis, Tennessee October of 1864. After violating his prior parole, he was transferred and incarcerated at the infamous Andersonville Prison in Georgia. Surviving his incarceration, he was released at wars end and sent to Vicksburg, Mississippi for travel home to Indiana, whereupon, he boarded the doomed steamer Sultana in April of 1865. A grossly overloaded 300-ft long Sultana with an estimated 2100 Union and Southern troops unexpectedly exploded on the morning of April 27 at approximately 2:30 in the morning. Between 1400 and 1500 of the traveling veterans met their watery grave in what was then the largest maritime disaster in United States history. Again, private Blackburn escaped death and made it home to his state of Indiana. This Sharps carbine originally 52 Cal. Percussion was converted with approximately 10000 others to 50-70 Gov cartridge to be re-issued for use during the Indian Wars period. The history of this rifle is not known since its conversion, however, it shows hard utilitarian use that is frequently found in Confederate, Western and Indian used firearms. Evidence of this hard use is a sliver of wood missing forward of bbl band on right side with eight very old but distinguishable holes in forearm and buttstock that possibly were tack decoration. Rear sight was purposely removed and bbl bored smooth to be used for foraging uses. A very primitive V shaped slot was cut into top of receiver ring as a provision for sighting use. CONDITION: Fair overall with lightly pitted smooth bore and functioning mechanics. Stocks are extremely weathered from a long life of outdoor use. Top receiver tang is cracked of forward screw, as is a very common ailment of these carbines. Carbine is complete and functioning with a unique and detailed history of having been issued to either the luckiest or unluckiest survivor of the Great War of Northern Aggression. 52191-1 TDW (7,500-10,000) – Lot 1242

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1251
$0.00
Revised: 10/13/2017

Please Note: The consecutive serial number to this revolver is lot number 1253.

RARE CONFEDERATE RIGDON & ANSLEY REVOLVER, AUGUSTA, GEORGIA.

SN 1786. Cal. 36. All SNs on this revolver are stamped with the correct small number dies. It is also to be noted that the number “1” is a broken die which became broken at pistol #1237, continuing to be used through the small-die run to R&A pistol #1900, or thereabouts. This gun has cryptic “W” stamped on left front web of trigger bow. Gun appears all orig with matching SNs “1786” that are found on bbl housing, latch, loading arm, frame, arbor, cylinder, backstrap, trigger guard and wedge. The grips are also SNd internally in the channel and have a “WH” (Wescom Hudgins) inspector’s cartouche. Top bbl flat is properly stamped “CSA”. Sometime in late November or early December of 1862, the firm of Leech & Rigdon, then located in Columbus, Mississippi, contracted with the Confederate Government to manufacture percussion revolvers of the Colt patent design, though contract was not signed for 1500 guns until firm settled in Greensboro, GA. With Union troops threatening the Columbus area, Leech & Rigdon moved its operation (its third move) to Greensboro, Georgia, where they began turning out revolvers in March of 1863. Approximately 1000 revolvers were produced at Greensboro, before it was again necessary to move because of Yankee pressure in the area. The Leech & Rigdon partnership split up in January of 1864, and Rigdon took all the gun-making machinery with him, moved to Augusta, Georgia (the fourth and last move) forming a new partnership with Jesse Ansley. Rigdon & Ansley assumed the responsibility of completing the orig Leech & Rigdon contract, by manufacturing the remaining 500 revolvers of that model, then going on with a new contract to furnish 1500 Rigdon & Ansley revolvers. While the Rigdon & Ansley revolvers were practically identical in design to the Leech & Rigdons, there were some changes made which were considered improvements at the time. The most obvious change was the addition of six (6) more cylinder stops on the Rigdon & Ansley, and the omission of the locking pins on the rear shoulders of the cylinder. This was thought to be a safety improvement in that it allowed the cylinder to be locked in place with the hammer resting between the percussion nipples. An additional change was the milling-out of a groove in the recoil shield, which now came to be called a “cap release groove”, which allowed spent percussion caps an easier exit from the frame, so that they were expelled via the groove at the right top side of the recoil shields as the cylinder rotated to the right in the firing and re-cocking procedure, after each round was fired. This “cap release groove” is found on this revolver along with the employment of a “Colt-type” loading lever latching assembly, rather than Leech & Rigdon ball and pin type catches. This is a pleasing example of Georgia made Rigdon & Ansley revolver with fine aesthetics, complete and orig. PROVENANCE: Ex-Clifford Young Collection, 1954; Ex-Fred Slaton Collection, 1960; Lifetime Collection of Dr. Zack Catterton. CONDITION: Very good overall, matching throughout, all major parts orig, the only discernible replacement is the wedge screw. Bbl retains tiny traces of orig blue finish with balance plum/brown with scattered nicks, dings, scratches and pinprick pitting. Frame and loading assembly have matching plum/brown color with pitting. Cylinder has rougher surface than rest of gun, grey/brown color with pitting, old cleaning and file marks, worn ratcheting and stops; SN is only partially discernible and may not actually match gun, though it does appear to be an orig Rigdon cylinder with correct partial SN dies. Front brass post sight is orig. Brass trigger guard and backstrap have yellow to dark mustard patina. Grips are sound and well fit with thin traces of orig varnish. Mechanically gun functions with well discerned rifling in bore. 51566-8 (17,000-20,000) – Lot 1251

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1253
$18,400.00
Revised: 10/13/2017

Please Note: The consecutive serial number to this revolver is lot number 1251.

RIGDON & ANSLEY CONFEDERATE PERCUSSION REVOLVER, SN 1785.

SN 1785. Cal. 36. This is a consecutive number revolver to the next lot, SN 1786 from the Zack Catterton Collection. If Mr. Racker had known that gun had existed, there’s little doubt he would have tried to make these two into a pair. Guns have very similar aesthetics overall though this example has a “Leech & Rigdon” cylinder with 6 stops with no safety pins, but has matching SN. This exact gun is the only example known with this variation and is pictured on pg 27 of William Gary’s “Confederate Revolvers”, 1987. This is an interesting variant with strong traces of original finish with sharp edges. Matching SNs are found on all parts normally numbered including bbl, frame, trigger guard, backstrap, cylinder, loading arm, latch, arbor and wedge. This gun is somewhat of an enigma in that it has a deeper bevel cut into frame at front of trigger guard, longer flat of rammer swivel, but appears original throughout. PROVENANCE: Eric Vaule, 1963; William Albaugh; Bob Howard, 1964; Cecil Anderson, 1970; Don Bryan, 1983; pictured on pg 27 William Gary “Confederate Revolvers”, 1987; outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Very good overall. Crisp action. Well defined rifling and bore. All markings are discernible and “CSA” proof is particularly sharp as is the “W” cryptic on left front web of trigger bow. Stocks are well fit with hand worn patina. Metal overall is dark with strong traces of thin finish on bbl housing and under bbl. Muted case colors are found on protected areas of loading assembly. The cylinder has a plum, patina though SN is stamped in the same style as are the matching numbers on gun. 51957-21 JS (15,000-20,000) – Lot 1253

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1262
$23,000.00
Revised: 10/13/2017

Please Note: Associated scrimshawed items are lot 1337, not the next lot as stated in the description.

FINE 1ST MODEL GRISWOLD REVOLVER FROM ESTATE OF CAPTAIN JOHN MORTON, N.B. FORREST’S CHIEF OF ARTILLERY.

SN 974. Cal. 36. This is an honest, well used Confederate 1st model Griswold that came from John W. Morton’s estate. John Watson Morton (1842-1914) Chief of Forrest’s Artillery, CSA. In 1861 John Morton was a student at the Western Military Institute in Nashville. After a short stint in the infantry, Morton joined the artillery. He was captured at Fort Donelson in 1862 and was held as a POW for several months before being exchanged. He joined Forrest’s command at Columbia, Tennessee and took command of his artillery. He was wounded at Parker’s Crossroads and at Thompson’s Station, Chickamauga, Brice’s Crossroads, Johnsonville and numerous other engagements he led his command with distinction. He was paroled at Gainesville, Alabama on May 10, 1865. After the war he returned to school to study medicine and was valedictorian of his class at the University of Tennessee. His postwar career included medicine, farming, journalism and politics, 1901-1909 was secretary of state for the State of Tennessee. He had the honor of being the first President of the Tennessee Division, United Confederate Veterans and was very involved with Confederate veteran organizations. His memoirs, “The Artillery of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s Cavalry” were published in 1909. In the last years of his life Capt. Morton lived with his daughter in Memphis and when he passed away was escorted by many prominent Memphis Confederate Veterans to his final resting place at Mount Olivet Cemetery in Nashville, TN where so many other prominent Confederates are buried. When Morton’s estate was sold in the house sale of Anne Morton Stout in 1982, many associated items were sold and dispersed with the late Mike Miner assembling most of his material, including sword, uniform and battery flag along with many photographs and reunion memorabilia. Miner always tried to buy this revolver and the gold portrait lockets being sold in the next lot. Revolver comes with notarized letter stating provenance from estate and a copy of March-April 1992 North South Trader’s Civil War telling the story of the Morton estate. PROVENANCE: John W. Morton; Morton family descendants; Anne Morton Stout Estate; David H. Wilson, 1982; The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson, 1998. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Gun appears all matching and orig with exception of 3 replaced screws. Iron is overall dark with pitting. Brass has been cleaned and now exhibits a medium mustard patina. Grips are sound with small putty repair where abutting frame. Grips have gap at backstrap, but are orig though no discernible penciled number can be seen, hand worn patina with tacking marks. Bbl has added brass blade front sight which appears contemporary to time of use. SN “974” found on bbl, cylinder and frame, secondary number “74” found on loading arm, hammer, trigger, backstrap and trigger guard. Roman numeral “IIIV” found on backstrap and trigger guard. Cryptic “U” is found on back of cylinder, bottom of bbl near latch, frame, trigger guard and backstrap. Mainspring is replaced, but mainspring screw appears orig. The wedge is unusual in that it appears orig, though originally a spring type (note orig spring wedges have been excavated at Griswoldville). The wedge is numbered “647”, the “6” is actually an upside down Griswold “9”. Normally wedges only had a secondary number, this is an anomaly which could be original. Mechanically gun functions, although sloppy with well defined rifled bore. 52430-6 JS (25,000-30,000) – Lot 1262

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1328
$2,875.00
Revised: 11/3/2017

Please Note: Cylinder replaced from later model. Seen in photo. Has safety notch that should not be there on this model.

RARE REMINGTON BEALS ARMY PERCUSSION REVOLVER.

SN 1173. Cal. 44. Blue finish with 8″ oct bbl, dovetailed German silver cone front sight with grooved top strap rear sight. Frame, bbl & cylinder are blue finished with color case hardened hammer and silver plated brass trigger guard. Mounted with smooth 2-pc walnut grips numbered to this revolver. Buttstrap bears the white ink number “FB-182”. This number is similar to the markings frequently found on specimens from the famous Karl Moldenhauer Collection. Grips, although matching numbered, do not exhibit inspector cartouches, however various other metal parts of this revolver have small inspector initials. Few Beals Army revolvers remain today with only about 1,900 produced in the period 1861-1862. They were virtually all issued to Union troops and saw continuous service throughout the Civil War and later on the American frontier, usually under harsh and adverse conditions with very limited or no maintenance. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very fine to extremely fine. Bbl retains 94-95% glossy orig blue with light muzzle & sharp edge wear; rammer handle retains about 75% thin orig blue; frame retains 60-70% flaked orig blue with the loss areas a light patina; hammer retains about all of its brilliant orig case colors; trigger guard retains 60-65% orig silver plating; front & backstraps are a gray metal patina and the buttstrap is a light brown patina; cyl retains 60-65% glossy orig blue with a light drag line. Right grip has a repaired crack, otherwise grips are sound showing light to moderate edge wear and overall retain about 50% orig finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. A rare Civil War era revolver in truly exceptional condition. 52328-2 (5,000-7,000) – Lot 1328

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1339
$109,250.00
Revised: 10/17/2017

Please Note: The correct spelling is Hawken not Hawkens.

ICONIC AND HISTORIC SILVER MOUNTED HAWKEN RIFLE OF GEORGE W. ATCHISON, ST. LOUIS, MO, 1836.

NSN. Cal. 52. This is no doubt the finest and most elaborate of all Hawkens rifles. This gun has never left the family descent of E.R. Butterworth who obtained the gun on his travels west in the 1870’s until now. This gun had previously been on public display at the Cody Firearms Museum for the past 20 years. This gun is orig and complete in every regard. This earliest form of Hawkens pre-dates their famous plains rifles. This gun was made during the “Mountain Man” era where few Hawkens products are known and none as elaborate or as fine as this example which measures 53-1/2″ overall with 37″ full oct bbl with 3 gold bands at breech and muzzle, browned finish, inset silver engraved maker’s mark “J & S HAWKENS”, dovetailed German silver front sight, full buckhorn rear sight on 3″ spring extension. Silver inlaid plaque on paneled cheekpiece engraved “G W ATCHISON / ST LOUIS / 1836”. The gun is totally silver mounted, including ramrod pipes, thimble, nosecap, forend wear plate, trigger guard, escutcheons for each key, buttplate, buttplate extensions, 4-pc patchbox, presentation plaque on paneled cheekpiece, plus 10 more decorative silver insets. In addition to silver mountings, there are an additional 6 mother-of-pearl scrimshawed insets and a horn oval inset between trigger guard and pierced silver buttplate extension which contains push button to open lid. Most silver is engraved with floral and geometric scrolls as is steel breech tang, hammer and “Golcher” lock and set trigger. Lock is attached via face by sgl screw into the steel breech tang. All screws are also engraved. Wood ramrod has iron threaded end for worm and silver plated brass tip.

George W. Atchison first came West from Vermont in 1830 as a private in the US Army fighting along the rivers during the Black Hawk War (1831-1832). It is interesting to note that private steamers were used by the Army during the war. Atchison established himself as a well known steamboat captain and boat builder on the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers not long after his army service. He first secured a clerkship on the steamship “Winnebago” when it came up from St. Louis to Armstrong in the Fall of 1832; the next summer he commanded The Winnebago himself and ran her in the St. Louis and Galena trade. In 1834, he commanded the steamer “Iowa” and later “Dubuque”, both in the upper river trade. The next year found him on the Lower Mississippi commanding “The Belle of Missouri” which he built in the winter of 1834-35. This ship sunk on its first trip by collision with another steamer. According to his obituary from a Davenport, IA newspaper Quad-City Times. This was “the beginning of enough bad luck to discourage a saint.”. In 1835, he built the steamer “George Collier”, she was too big to pass through the locks at Louisville, KY. In 1838, he built the steamer “Governor Dodge”, she sunk at Island 21 that Fall. The then built the steamer “Corsican” which sunk above Baton Rouge, LA”. Atchison went on to build other boats including the double engine “Amaranth” for the New Orleans trade. On May 1, 1843, he loaded almost 500 tons of cargo on the ship made to carry 200 tons; he did make it to New Orleans. No wonder so many of his ships litter the Mississippi and Missouri River basins. Atchison obviously made a very good living as he was able to buy the most magnificent Jacob & Samuel Hawken rifle of its day. Atchison did retire in 1853 selling his last ships and retired to a fine farm in Missouri. Read the various newspaper clippings on line; it’s amazing how many ships he built and sunk and the massive amounts of cargo he transported.

It is interesting to note that a fluted anchor is among the engraved designs found in the finial of the patchbox, no doubt representing Atchison’s maritime history. PROVENANCE: George W. Atchison, 1836; E.R. Butterworth about 1870; Butterworth family descents. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Gun is complete and orig. Half of one ear of rear sight is broken and there is a contemporary to time of use repaired wood chip just forward of lock which is backed internally with well patinaed piece of cloth. Remainder of stock is well fit with one crack opposite lock. Checkered wrist is worn. Areas of dark orig varnish are found mostly in protected areas. Bbl is overall plum/brown with minor cosmetic blemishes. Iron lockplate, hammer and breech have traces of case colors, overall a dark silver/grey. Silver mounts have light patina. Reinforced iron tip at top of silver buttplate has dark iron patina. All insets are complete and intact though one mother-of-pearl “leaf” forward of presentation plaque is cracked. Engraving on silver mostly crisp with some wear on forearm wear plate. Mechanically functional with crisp 7-groove rifled bore. 52461-1 JS (80,000-100,000) – Lot 1339

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1378
$6,900.00
Revised: 10/28/2017

Please Note: There was a typographical error. The missing piece is on the right side, not the left side.

EXTRAORDINARY GERMAN WHEELOCK SPORTING RIFLE WITH CHISELED LOCK AND BBL, ENTIRE STOCK VENEERED IN WHITE STAG HORN.

NSN. Lock, bbl and mounts circa 1720. The stock decoration possibly of the period, but regardless fully veneered stocks are rarely seen of this quality. The artwork is masterful and equal to the finest work found on the well known series of late 17th century German flattened cow horn flasks. The lock is chiseled in relief with the wheel cover a double headed eagle, possibly that of the Austrian Hapsburg family. PROVENANCE: HH Thomas collection; sold James D. Julia, Inc. March 2010, lot 2561; outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 2010. CONDITION: Metal retains an overall dark brown/gray surface. Stag horn inlays all appear original with only minor restoration. Missing a thin 6″ piece of veneer on left side of forestock. Regardless this is a magnificent piece of art from the well known HH Thomas collection. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. 51957-28 JS (8,000-12,000) ESA – Lot 1378

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1422
$8,625.00
Revised: 10/20/2017

Please Note: Chamber length is 2-3/4″ not 3″.

*UNUSUAL FOX “XE” SHOTGUN WITH DEEPLY CUT ENGRAVING WITH CALLAHAN LETTER.

SN 22490. Cal. 12 ga. 3″ Chambers. 32″ Bbls are stamped “Krupp Fluid Steel” and “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO. PHILA. PA ” on tops either side of slightly raised, matted rib, with front ivory bead. Breech ends are engraved with second generation “X” grade 2″ triangles of large shaded scroll and acanthus. Bbl flats are stamped with SN, grade, and Fox proof. Case hardened action features automatic safety (SAFE engraved), and dbl triggers. Action is engraved with near full coverage bold open scrolling acanthus which surrounds vignettes of snipe on left, and grouse on right. The engraving on the sides of this gun is exceptionally deep. Fences are also acanthus engraved. “ANSLEY H. FOX” is over each bird scene. Bottom of action depicts a bushy tailed fox within oval border. Trigger plate is engraved with more acanthus scroll, but not as deep as action. Trigger guard has more scroll flanking vacant shield. SN is on tang. Very finely figured and well marbled dense European walnut pistol grip buttstock measures 13-3/4″ over ribbed composition buttplate. Pistol grip ends in an ogee flourish instead of being capped. Side panels are checkered and checkering at grip is of modified point pattern in two sections separated by ribbons. Typical high grade Fox extra long splinter forend with inset schnabeled ebony tip, is checkered to match buttstock. Interior of iron is engraved with patent dates. Bore diameter: left -.727, right – .727. Bore restrictions: left – .034 (full), right – .021 (mod). Wall thickness: left – .032, right – .030. Drop at heel: 2-1/2″, drop at comb: 1-1/2″. Cast about 1/4″ on. Weight: 7 lbs. 4 oz. LOP: 13-3/4″. PROVENANCE: Callahan letter giving specifications from orig build card and stating gun was originally built with single selective trigger. (It appears gun was returned to factory for new trigger plate and trigger guard at some time.) Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbls retain nearly all of a well done rust re-blue, over some light scratches and marks, with subsequent silvering on rib. Action retains 70 – 80% orig color, silvered and thinned on fences and beads, considerably lightened on bottom of action (color was never very strong.). Trigger guard retains nearly all of what appears to be its orig blue with some small rust stains. Stocks retain most of their orig hand rubbed oil finish with a number of light marks and compressions. Checkering lightly worn. Bores are very fine to excellent, very lightly frosted. Action is tight. Ejectors are strong and in time. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. 51980-13 MGM (8,000-12,000) C&R; ESA – Lot 1422

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1468
$0.00
Revised: 10/20/2017

Please Note: Turnbull Restorations has confirmed that this gun was partially restored by them in the late 1990’s. Records do not indicate the exact nature of the restoration.

*SCARCE LITTLE PARKER .410 “VHE” SHOTGUN IN HIGH ORIGINAL CONDITION WITH FACTORY LETTER.

SN 241083. Cal. .410 ga. 3″ Chambers. 000 Frame. 26″ Bbls are unmarked on concave matted rib, twin ivory beads. Bbl flats are stamped with SN, Parker overload proofs, Remington date code “DF” (Sept 1937), and weight. Grade and gauge are on left side of lump. Small case hardened hammerless action features automatic safety (SAFE engraved) and dbl triggers. Water table with lightening cuts is stamped with all correct Meriden markings. Action is wiggle border engraved. “PARKER” is on bottom of action. Blued trigger guard has SN on tang. Nicely fiddle figured American walnut Parker capped pistol grip buttstock measures 14″ over Parker dogs head buttplate without spur. Checkering at grip is of typical “V” point pattern. A silver shield engraved “T.P.” is on toe line. Matching splinter ejector forend has steel tip, and typical Parker release. Interior of iron is stamped with SN. Bore diameter at muzzles: left -.395, right – .400. Wall thickness: left – .038, right – .037. Drop at heel: 2-11/16″, drop at comb: 1-11/16″. Neutral cast. Weight: 5 lbs. 12 oz. LOP: 14″. Gun matches specifications as listed in the PARKER GUN IDENTIFICATION & SERIALIZATION ledger. PROVENANCE: Factory letter with orig specifications indicating the gun was shipped Sept. 1937. Prestigious and lifetime Parker and Winchester collection of Dr. Tom Bouwkamp. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbls retain 95 – 98% orig blue, silvered on edges of rib with light flecking overall. Action retains 85 – 90% what appears to be orig case hardening color, silvered on thumbpiece and top tang, as well as around bottom from normal hand wear. Forend latch and tip have lots of color. Trigger guard retains approx 95% blue, lightly flaked and silvered at grip. Buttstock retains nearly all of its orig finish with a large number of marks, scratches, and compressions, some fairly deep on butt. Checkering lightly worn. Forend wood is very clean with only a few of the lightest of handling marks. Bores are excellent. Mechanically excellent. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. 52170-14 MGM (20,000-30,000) C&R; ESA – Lot 1468

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1560
$74,750.00
Revised: 10/20/2017

Please Note: This important Henry Presentation rifle to John Brown is featured in the latest book by noted author, Donald Dallas, “Alexander Henry, Rifle Maker”. Available from the author this fall for 60 (GBP). A brief video can be viewed on Julia’s website.

ALEXANDER HENRY DOUBLE RIFLE PRESENTED CHRISTMAS 1873 BY QUEEN VICTORIA TO HER ESTEEMED SCOTTISH SERVANT, FRIEND, CONFIDANTE, (LOVER? MORGANATIC HUSBAND?), AND SAVIOR JOHN BROWN, WITH ORIGINAL CASE AND ACCESSORIES, PLUS SUPPORTING BOOKS AND DVD.

SN 3210. (1873) Cal. .450BPE. This fine rifle was given to John Brown for Christmas in 1873. He saved Queen Victoria from an assassination attempt in Buckingham Palace gardens on 29 Feb 1872. Before this time Brown had been a gillie and servant to both Queen Victoria and Prince Albert during their visits to Balmoral Castle in Scotland. Brown had become a particular favorite and confidante of the Queen. After the death of Albert in 1861, her period of mourning finished, the Queen returned to Balmoral in 1863. Shortly thereafter she was involved in a coaching accident with Brown in attendance. Brown quickly recovered his composure and assisted the Queen. After this incident the Queen became inseparable from Brown, and he became not only her highland companion but he was brought to Windsor Palace in London to act as her full time personal attendant and “gatekeeper”. In later years the pair remained inseparable and even had adjoining rooms. The Queen was often snidely referred to as “Mrs. Brown” or “Empress Brown”. There were even rumors that they were secretly married as Victoria wore Brown’s mother’s wedding ring for the rest of her life; and was even secretly buried with it on her finger. This rifle is the only known firearm personally presented by Queen Victoria to any individual. It has 28″ “best” chopper lump Damascus bbls with full length rib, holding one standing, one folding leaf express rear sight, with folding leaf (marked for 200 yards), as well as a small silver bead front sight. Rib is file cut behind the rear sight, and from approx 6″ in front of that sight to the muzzles. The unmatted portion is engraved “Alexr Henry. 12. South St. Andrew St Edinburgh. Patent No 2377.” (Use number for Henry rifling) and “Maker to Their Royal Highnesses’ The Prince of Wales and the Duke of Edinburgh”. Bbl flats are stamped with SN and “A.H”. Bottoms of bbls are stamped with London black powder proofs, as well as chopper lump Damascus patent number “2673” over a hammer logo, and “Henry’s patent A&T 1355” and “1356”. Adams and Tate were bbl makers and the numbers represent individual tubes they made on which royalties were to be paid to Henry. A sling eye is attached to bottom rib. Round bodied Jones underlever action is fitted with back action peninsula non-rebounding locks having tall spurred round bodied serpentine hammers and front sliding stalking safeties that engage at half cock. Action and locks are engraved with 70% coverage well cut varying sized scroll with some small scroll borders in classic “best” fashion. “ALEXr HENRY” is in swagged riband on each lockplate. SN is on trigger guard tang. Very fine, highly stump figured, and nicely marbled European walnut horn capped pistol grip buttstock measures 15″ over checkered wood butt with engraved steel heel and toe plates. Stock also features small beaded shadow line cheekpiece, classic point pattern checkering at grip, and a sling eye matching that on bbl on toe line. Left side of stock behind cheekpiece has inlet 1-1/8″ high gold shield engraved “FROM” “V.R.” “TO” “J. BROWN ESQr” “CHRISTMAS” “1873”. Matching splinter forend with inlet fancy steel tip attaches to bbls with captive side bolt through shaped and engraved steel escutcheons. Drop at heel: approx 3″, drop at comb: approx 2-1/16″. Weight: 8 lbs. 2 oz. LOP: 15″. Rifle is accompanied by its orig oak and leather case with shaped brass corners, in a style unique to Alexander Henry. There are traces of gold wash on corners. There is a small circular central brass medallion on top. Leather is gold embossed “J. BROWN ESQ. H. M. P. ATTENDANT” “BALMORAL”. Interior is lined in tan pigskin, and has Alexander Henry paper label in lid, with 12 South St. Andrew Street address. Case has lift-out tray revealing cartridge storage area below. Tray houses rifle and contains a near complete array of tools, and other accessories for reloading and cleaning, including a steel Davis type mold marked with this guns SN casting a conical bullet, along with hollow pointing pin with ebony handle, a Bartram leather covered powder flask with German silver head and spout, green japanned and German silver capper/ decapper, ebony handled bullet fixer with this rifles SN, steel nipple key with spare nipples and firing pins under brass cap, wad punch, 2-pc rosewood and brass cleaning rod with jag, round pewter oil bottle, and a rosewood patch container. Also there is an ebony handled turn screw which does not quite match remainder of accessories. Also included is a large modern aluminum and blue plastic shipping case with cut outs for rifle. This exact rifle was once part of the famous Clay P. Bedford collection and is documented in the book “Early Firearms of Great Britain and Ireland from the Collection of Clay P. Bedford” published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art on page 103. The book accompanied the Met’s exhibition of the Clay P. Bedford collection in the early 1970s, and this rifle was considered the most important firearm of the exhibit. PROVENANCE: Voluminous consignor’s notes. Factory letter confirming this rifle was completed on 20 Dec 1873 for “Her Majesty the Queen (for John Brown)”. It is recorded as having 28″ bbls with patent use no. 2376. Books: “Leaves from the Journal of Our Life in the Highlands, From 1848 to 1861” ed, by Arthur Helps (1868), “More Leaves from the Journal of a Life In the Highlands from 1862 to 1882”, and “John Brown: Queen Victoria’s Highland Servant” by Raymond Lamont-Brown. Also included is a DVD “Her Majesty Mrs. Brown” starring Judi Dench and Billy Connolly. CONDITION: Very fine, original, as found. Bbls retain most, perhaps as much as 75%, orig brown having excellent definition to Damascus pattern, with a number of scuffs and marks, some fairly deep. Action retains 30% – 40″ orig case hardening color, generally faded overall, but quite strong where protected, especially between hammers. Left lock is in similar condition, right lock exhibits considerably more orig color, approaching 70%. Loss on left side can most likely be attributed to light exposure from exhibition over the years. Stocks retain most of their orig hand rubbed oil finish with numerous marks, scratches, and bumps associated with many years of stalking in the braes above Balmoral. Checkering is somewhat worn, especially on forend where it is considerably flattened. Bores are very fine, shiny with scattered pitting throughout, heaviest in left bbl. Rifling is still strong. Action is tight. Locks are crisp. Safeties work. Case leather is good, considerably darkened, with numerous bumps, rubs, and scuffs. Gold of embossing is somewhat faded. Interior leather is very good to fine with considerable rubs and soiling. Label is good, foxed, with some areas of soiling and rubs. Lift-out tray has one of the velvet lift tabs detached. All partitions remain intact, but show some rubs and stains. Accessories are generally very fine. New shipping case is fine. It is hard to imagine a rifle with a more ironclad, interesting and romantic royal provenance. 51678-1 MGM (50,000-80,000) – Lot 1560

The following video, used with permission, highlights a new book by Donald Dallas for which he collaborated with the great great grandson and great great great grandson of Alexander Henry. This very gun is referenced in the video and in the book, which is is available from http://www.donalddallas.com

Click here to view provenance

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1615
$16,100.00
Revised: 10/28/2017

Please Note:  Barrels of Gun #2 are sleeved.

CASED PAIR OF BOSS LEFT SIDE LEVER SIDELOCK EJECTOR GAME SHOTGUNS.

SN 4086/4234. (1890 and 1892) Cal. 12 ga. 2-1/2″ Chambers (4086 plug gauge stops 1/32″ shy of 2-3/4″). 30″ Dovetailed Damascus bbls (4086) and later dovetailed steel bbls (4234) have “Boss & Co 73 St. James’s Street. London.” on slightly swamped game ribs. Rear portions are gold inlaid “1” and “2”. (Although guns are a couple hundred numbers apart, Boss records indicate gun “4234” was made in 1892 to pair with “4086”.) These numbers are also in gold on tops of actions, but not marked on forends. Bbl flats of Damascus bbls are stamped with 1989 London re-proofs for 2-1/2″ chambers at 736. Steel bbls are stamped with what appear to be spurious London proofs. Square back sidelock actions with side levers mounted on left sides feature automatic safeties (SAFE inlaid in gold), and dbl triggers. Actions are engraved with Boss house style rose and scroll, and even at this early date, were most likely executed by the Sumner family. Sides of actions are engraved “BOSS’S PATENT EJECTOR”, and “BOSS & CO” is in scrolled riband at the front of each lockplate. Trigger guards with open scroll surrounding perched pigeons on bows, have SNs are on tangs. Superbly matched, spectacular marbled and flame figured European walnut straight grip newly made buttstocks measure 14-3/4″ over checkered wood butts with horn heel and toe plates. Stocks are classically styled with drop points, point pattern checkering on diamond hands, and vacant gold ovals on toe lines. Matching short splinter ejector forends have forward pivoting lever releases. Ejectors are of early Boss pattern with plunger housings on irons. Gun 4086: Bore diameter: left -.737, right – .736. Bore restrictions: left – .022 (mod), right – .010 (IC). Wall thickness: left – .018, right – .020. Drop at heel: 2-7/16″, drop at comb: 1-3/8″. Neutral cast. Weight: 6 lbs. 9 oz. LOP: 14-3/4″. Gun 4234: Bore diameter: left -.731, right – .730. Bore restrictions: left – .026 (Imod), right – .007 (IC). Wall thickness: left – .031, right – .032. Drop at heel: 2-1/2″, drop at comb: 1-7/16″. Neutral cast. Weight: 6 lbs. 13 oz. LOP: 14-3/4″. Guns are housed in a period Boss two gun leather case, possibly orig, with large Boss paper St. James’s Street label in lid. Case is lined in scarlet cloth. CONDITION: Very fine as refurbished. Bbls retain nearly all of their London quality finishes. Damascus has good definition to pattern. Newer steel bbls, have nearly all their orig finish. Actions and locks retain a considerable amount, perhaps as much as 40%, orig case hardening color, with some areas of brown staining. High quality newly made stocks retain essentially all of their orig hand rubbed oil finish, with a few slight subsequent marks. Bores are very fine to excellent. Actions are tight. Bbls are on face. Ejectors are in time. Case leather is fine, still relatively light in color. Interior cloth is fine, soiled and rubbed. Label is foxed with two rubs through. 52620-1 MGM (17,500-27,500) – Lot 1615

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1653
$9,200.00
Revised: 10/26/2017

Please Note: Condition: Exceptionally fine as professionally restored.

*BAROQUE ENGRAVED PERUGINI & VISINI SIDELOCK EJECTOR SINGLE TRIGGER GAME SHOTGUN ENGRAVED BY R. GRECO WITH CASE.

SN 2388. Cal. 12 ga. 27-5/8″ Chopper lump bbls with medium game rib, are engraved “PERUGINI & VISINI” on left side. Bbl flats are stamped with 1997 Italian nitro proofs for 2-3/4″ chambers. Coin finished action with non-automatic safety and double triggers (front articulated) is fully engraved with large flowing shaded acanthus and scroll, interspersed with floral accents. Makers name is on ribbon on bottom of action and engravers signature “R. Greco” is on banner on trigger plate in front of trigger guard bow. SN is on trigger guard tang with guard engraved to match action. Spectacular oil finished intricately marbled and burl figured European walnut straight grip buttstock measures 14-1/8″ over checkered wood butt, and features nicely fluted drop points and well cut point pattern checkering at grip. A gold oval on toe line is engraved “LA”. Matching splinter ejector forend has Anson release. Bore diameter: left -.726, right – .725. Bore restrictions: left – .018 (mod), right – .003 (IC). Drop at heel: 2-1/4″, drop at comb: 1-1/2″. Neutral cast. Weight: 6 lbs. 12 oz. LOP: 14-1/8″. Green canvas case with stitched leather corners is lined in green felt. CONDITION: Exceptionally fine, essentially as new, appears unfired since proof, with only the faintest of handling marks in all exterior finishes, with a few scratches on lump from assembly. Mechanically crisp. Case is excellent. 52660-1 MGM (7,500-11,000) – Lot 1653

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1686
$8,050.00
Revised: 10/17/2017

Please Note: This shotgun is a model 203E, not 303E as stated in the catalog.

*HIGH QUALITY MERKEL 303E SIDELOCK EJECTOR OVER-UNDER SHOTGUN WITH EXCELLENT, WELL DETAILED ENGRAVING, AND CASE.

SN 36505. Cal. 16 ga. 2-3/4″ Chambers. 26″ Demi-bloc bbls with solid matted rib are marked and engraved “GEBRUDER MERKEL” and “GERMANY” at breech ends, which are surrounded by some well cut shaded scroll. Bottom bbl is stamped with Sept 1952 East German nitro proofs for 2-3/4″ chambers, and rear of left ejector is stamped “2-3/4”. French grey double Kersten OU sidelock action features automatic safety (SAFE engraved), raised rib tumbler end cocking indicators, hand detachable sidelocks with H&H type lever on right lockplate, and dbl triggers (front articulated). Action is engraved with near full coverage extremely well cut and nicely shaded large open scroll with some floral highlights. Lockplates are semi relief engraved with finely detailed interesting game scenes. On left a pair of black game cock are sparring in alpine meadow while a trio of hens watch from foreground. Right side depicts four ducks taking wing from marsh while another swims away, as a bemused pointer looks on. Trigger plate is marked “Gebruder Merkel Suhl”. Matching scroll is on trigger guard. Well marbled and figured European walnut capped pistol grip buttstock measures 15″ over black open sided Pachmayr white line pad. Grip cap is plain. Area behind lockplates is very nicely scroll carved. Closely spaced point pattern checkering is at grip. A vacant silver oval is on toe line. Ejector forend is of 3-pc type with removable bottom piece having Deeley type release. Bore diameter: top -.672, bottom – .670. Bore restrictions: top – .024 (IMod), bottom – .014 (mod). Wall thickness: top – .036, bottom – .036. Drop at heel: 2-11/16″, drop at comb: 1-1/2″. Cast 1/2″ off. Weight: 6 lbs. 8 oz. LOP: 15″. Gun is accompanied by A&F marked leg o’ mutton case. CONDITION: Very good to Excellent. Bbls retain over 80% orig blue with numerous light marks and silvering on sharp edges. Action retains most of its french grey finish which is quite pleasing. Stocks retain most of their orig hand rubbed oil finish with numerous marks, most light, some heavy, checkering slightly worn. Pad was installed many years ago to what appears to be orig curve of butt. Bores are excellent. Action is tight. Ejectors are strong and in time. Case leather is good with some tape repairs to end cap and rear flap, which is detached. Straps and handle are good. A very nicely appointed lightweight early post war Merkel. 52199-1 MGM (7,500-11,500) C&R – Lot 1686

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2081
$28,750.00
Revised: 10/20/2017

Please Note: Post type AA sight broken at joint where round ring circle peep sight aperture.

**RAMO SIDEPLATE BROWNING MODEL 1919A4 MACHINE GUN ON TRIPOD WITH NUMEROUS ACCESSORIES (FULLY TRANSFERABLE).

SN 800113. Cal. .30-06. 25″ bbl. This is a great shooters set up for the classic Browning air cooled machine gun, which served through WWII, Korea and Vietnam. In addition to the gun itself, which currently has an after market spade backplate and “7.62” marked bolt, there is an orig backplate with hand grip with clip at base, detachable shoulder stock and bipod to convert this to gun 1919A6 configuration. There is a traverse and elevation mechanism with a special bracket so that this can mount on the traditional M3 tripod, however, currently this gun is on a Colt commercial tripod with a reproduction brass Colt identification plate on the center leg. An anti-aircraft extension post for the US tripod, reproduction ammo can hanger box, and GI ammo can are also included as is a desirable Model of 1918 Browning belt filling machine, and a “TNW” Automatic Linking Machine. There are approximately 300 disintegrating links in extremely fine condition in a plastic bag and twelve cloth belts also included. Spare parts include two chrome-lined 1919A4 bbls, three 1919A4 lock frame springs, three 1919A4 lock frame trigger pins, two 1919A4 top cover springs, two 1919A4 bolt drive springs, three 1919A4 sear springs, three 1919A4 bolt firing pins and two 1919A4 extractor assemblies. There is a GI broken case extractor and a post-type anti-aircraft spider sight in a leather pouch, and blank firing adapter. There is also a combination tool and US GI web rifle case. One field manual 23-55, dated 1965 and technical manual 9-1005-212-25 dated June 1969 are included as well as a reprint of the Ordnance Manual TM9-1205 from 1944. As a neat bonus, these parts and accessories come in a US GI WWII footlocker, originally manufactured in 1942. This is a National Firearms Act item and requires BATF approval prior to transfer. This weapon is fully transferable on an ATF form 3 or 4. CONDITION: Overall appearance and finish is extremely fine as re-finished upon re-manufacture with hard composition carrying and spade handles. Gun mechanics are crisp. Parts are un-serialized. Firing mechanism functions smoothly when operated by hand. Bore is extremely fine, shiny and bright as are bores in 308 bbls. Parts and loading machine are likewise very fine and appear serviceable. Tripod has been repainted. Belts all appear to be in very fine serviceable condition. Footlocker is in good condition with some brassing to the corners and cracks to the plywood. The Browning air cooled machine gun is one of the best belt-fed recreational shooting platforms available, rugged and reliable. With spare parts, belts and ammunition available, it makes a shooting enthusiasts ideal “first” belt-fed machine gun as well as a model the advanced enthusiast takes to the range over and over. 51998-1 JWK (15,000-22,000) – Lot 2081

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