Fall 2017 Extraordinary Firearms Auction
Grosses Over $15.1 Million

Auction: October 31, November 1 & 2, 2017: 10am

Preview: October 30, 2017: 9am - 7pm and October 31: 7am - 10am | November 1 & 2: 8am - 10am

Please Note: All prices include the hammer price plus the buyer’s premium, which is paid by the buyer as part of the purchase price. The prices noted here after the auction are considered unofficial and do not become official until after the 46th day.

If you have questions please email firearms@jamesdjulia.com.




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1001
$28,750.00

SUPERB UNTOUCHED VOLCANIC REPEATING ARMS COMPANY NAVY SIZE PISTOL WITH 8″ BARREL NEAR NEW.

SN 324. Cal. 41. 8″ bbl. Blue finish with gun metal receiver. Case colored hammer. Blue lever. 2-pc varnished walnut grips. Bbl has 3-line address reading “The Volcanic Arms Co. Patent New Haven Conn. Feb. 14. 1854”. Rear face of loading collar shows assembly no. “95”. Assembly no. “95” is also stamped on front face of bbl under collar. “598” is stamped on front face of magazine follower. SN appears on left side of grip strap at bottom under grip, on right side of lever by hinge, inside of each sideplate, on side of each toggle, on left side of elevator, right side of firing pin, and at top of each grip on inside. CONDITION: A wonderfully preserved, unfired example of a Volcanic Arms Company Navy Pistol with an 8″ bbl, seldom if ever seen in this condition. Bbl has fabulous blue finish. Bbl address is sharp. Assembly nos. are sharp. Bore appears unfired. Magazine follower retains nearly all of blue finish. Gun metal receiver is a much desired deep rich mustard-brown patina. Rear-sight retains nearly all of the fire-blue finish. Rear of firing pin shows nearly all of fire-blue finish. Elevator shows nearly all of fire-blue finish, with some staining, on both sides of firing pin and at bottom of surface. Hammer shows nearly all of muted case coloring with a few slight scratches on left side. Trigger retains most all of its case color finish. Lever retains nearly all of its dark-blue finish with slight flaking. Hammer screw shows a considerable amount of blue on head. Lever screw is very slightly marred. Elevator and lever spring screws show traces of blue. Trigger spring shows all of its fire-blue. Grips retain nearly all of piano varnish finish with some light handling marks and slight high point wear at bottom of each grip. A Volcanic Arms Company Navy Pistol in a remarkable state of preservation with an estimated production of only 1,500 made. This gives the advanced collector a once in a life time opportunity to add possibly the best specimen extant to his collection. Almost impossible to improve upon. 51096-1 (30,000-50,000) – Lot 1001

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1005
$0.00

FINE HOGGSON ENGRAVED HENRY MODEL 1860 LEVER ACTION RIFLE.

SN 12181. Cal. 44RF Henry. Beautiful late Henry rifle with 24-1/4″ oct bbl that has integral magazine tube, late style, square back nickel silver front sight and 900 yard Henry ladder rear sight with slide stop screw. Top flat of the bbl has the later large font 2-line Henry’s Patent date and the New Haven Arms Co address. Mounted with very nicely figured, uncheckered American walnut that has the finish of presentation quality Henry’s and the later Winchester Model 1866 rifles (most unusual on a Henry rifle). Left side of buttstock has a factory sling swivel with corresponding sling loop in the left gullet of the bbl. Receiver is silver plated and engraved by Samuel Hoggson with his trademark deer leaping a rail fence on the left sideplate surrounded by foliate arabesque patterns that have pearled background. Right side of the receiver and sideplate, both front side panels, rear edges of the receiver, top 3 flats of the receiver and buttplate tang are engraved to match. SN on the bbl was partially obliterated when the bbl was refinished, with only the last 4 digits visible. Full SN was observed on the left side of lower tang, under the wood, inside top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Bottom tang also has the assembly number “68” which is also found on the side of the magazine follower. Left side of top tang is marked with the letter “F”. Rnd section of the bbl, under the rotating sleeve is marked with the assembly number “125” with matching number on rear face of loading sleeve. Rifle has late features including a sloping radius on top rear of receiver, large magazine follower tab with milled rebated area for the tab in bottom front of frame, the late style front sight and pointed heel on the buttplate. Almost certainly this rifle belonged to someone who held it in great regard and cared for it to the best of their ability. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Bbl and magazine retain 50-60% thinning, very old style restored blue with a wear spot from a sling near the front sling loop. Chamber area of the side flats have small wrench mark on each side. Receiver retains 88-90% strong orig silver, lightly oxidized showing very light edge wear, exposing the brass. Buttplate retains about 75% strong orig silver showing wear on the heel and toe. Hammer retains strong case colors and the lever is a light silver/brown patina. Stock is sound with a few light scratches and retains most of its fine varnish finish that resembles the later presentation Winchester Model 1866 rifles. Mechanics are crisp. Strong bore with sharp rifling and moderate pitting. 52219-1 JRL (35,000-45,000) – Lot 1005

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1073
$0.00

*VERY RARE WINCHESTER DELUXE EXTRA LIGHTWEIGHT LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER.

SN 129131. Cal. 45-70. Very rare rifle with 22″ extra light tapered rnd bbl, full magazine, ramp mounted Lyman ivory bead hunting front sight and flat top rear sight. Mounted with about 2-X American walnut with H-style checkered forearm and capped pistol grip stock that has Winchester embossed hard rubber buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly number “238”, “XX” and an “R”. Matching assembly number is also found in top tang channel of buttstock. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this rifle in Cal. 45-70, extra light 22″ rnd bbl, plain trigger, checkered pistol grip stock with rubber shotgun buttplate & oil finish, Winchester high velocity sights and full magazine, received in the warehouse March 30, 1905 and shipped the next day to order # 5930. These lightweight rifles were extremely popular as hunting arms, especially in the North Woods, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and Alaska and in the 45-70 caliber is certainly capable of taking any North American big game up to and including the great bears of Alaska and the Arctic. This rifle was obviously someone’s prized hunting gun. CONDITION: Fine to very fine, all matching. Bbl and magazine tube retain about 95% strong orig blue with several spots of blood pitting on left side of magazine tube toward muzzle end and on the front sight. Receiver retains 93-95% glossy orig blue with a series of small scratches on both sides and sharp edge wear. Hammer retains most of its orig case colors, fading on the spur. Lever retains bright case colors on the sides, faded to silver on the outer faces. Buttstock has a hairline back of top tang, otherwise wood is sound with usual light nicks, dings and scratches and retains most of its orig oil finish. Mechanics are crisp. Very bright shiny bore. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. 52404-3 (9,000-12,000) C&R; ESA – Lot 1073

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1112
$10,925.00

SCARCE MARLIN MODEL 1893 DELUXE SPECIAL ORDER LEVER ACTION RIFLE.

SN 98918. Cal. 38-55. Beautiful deluxe Marlin with oct bbl, full magazine ivory bead combination front sight and semi-buckhorn rear sight. Top tang is mounted with a Marbles spring-loaded sight with large disc aperture. Mounted with very highly figured, streaky, flame grain American walnut with G-checkered forearm and serpentine grip buttstock that has crescent buttplate. Left side of top tang, under the wood is marked with matching SN which is also found in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Receiver is color case hardened and beautifully engraved by Conrad Ulrich in no. 5 pattern which consist of the large oval vignette of a whitetail buck and doe in a detailed forest scene surrounded by foliate arabesque patterns that have fine pearled background. Both sides of receiver are outlined in latch hook and scallop border patterns. Right side and flat side of bolt are engraved in matching foliate arabesque patterns with a foliate spray back of loading gate opening. Each side of the lever boss is engraved to match. Bottom of receiver is engraved with a foliate spray around the floor plate screw with matching arabesque patterns. Matching border patterns and engraving extend over top of receiver, top tang, each side of forend cap and about 3-1/4″ of the exposed five flats of the bbl over the chamber area. While the model 1893 was produced in fairly large numbers, extremely few were ordered deluxe and of those exceedingly few were engraved. Color case hardened receivers rarely survive with any colors due to the fact that exposure to sunlight and ultraviolet rays rapidly fades the colors to gray. Consequently finding one with high orig finish is a great rarity. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Russell Grinnell. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Bbl retains 96-97% strong orig blue with some scattered spots of fine surface etching. Magazine tube retains about 98% strong orig blue, also with very few small spots of surface etching. Receiver & bolt retain about all of their orig case colors, bright in sheltered areas, lightly to moderately faded elsewhere. Top and bottom tangs retain brilliant case colors as does the hammer. Lever retains strong case colors on the sides, moderately faded and turning dark in out faces with some fine surface rust. Buttplate retains about all of its orig case colors, moderately faded. Wood is sound with a few light nicks and scratches and retains most of a lightly applied extra finish over what appears to be orig finish without sanding or cleaning. Mechanics are crisp. Very bright shiny bore with slight roughness in the grooves. 52204-3 JRL (12,500-17,500) – Lot 1112

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1117
$8,050.00

*BEAUTIFUL CRESCENT GRADE FACTORY ENGRAVED SAVAGE MODEL 1899 TAKEDOWN LEVER ACTION RIFLE THAT BELONGED TO DR. O’CONNOR OF WISCONSIN.

SN 109096. Cal. 303 Savage. Fine deluxe rifle with 26″ tapered rnd bbl, replacement D. W. King Denver, CO 1908 patent ivory, copper and black composite triple bead front sight, Savage flat top sporting rear sight and Lyman folding tang sight. Mounted with very fancy, B-carved and checkered American walnut with schnable tip forearm and serpentine grip buttstock with Savage embossed hard rubber butt plate. Receiver is “C” engraved by master engraver Enoch Tue, with the round vignette of a running elk stag leaping a fence on the left side and a drinking elk stag on the right side. Both sides of the receiver have full coverage, foliate arabesque patterns with very fine pearled background. Engraving extends on top left side of receiver and receiver ring with light floral patterns on the bottom. This rifle was the property of Dr. Walter F. O’Connor (1874-1946) of Ladysmith, WI. He purchased it from Von Lengerke & Antoine of Chicago. Dr. O’Connor was the classical small town doctor & surgeon in Northwest Wisconsin at the turn of the century who apparently loved to hunt. Some of his exploits are recorded in the publication The Bucks Camp Log 1916-1928 and also On The Hunt, Willging. When Dr. O’Connor passed away in 1946, this rifle passed to his son, Walter F. O’Connor (1914-2006) who, in turn gave it to his son James C. O’Connor. While Savage Model 99 rifles are fairly common, those with engraving and especially those with carved highly figured wood are very rare. PROVENANCE: O’Connor Family as previously outlined; various books and photographs showing previous owners with this exact gun; Estate collection of Russell Grinnell. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Bbl retains about 96-97% glossy orig blue with light muzzle end wear and a spot of rust about mid-point. Receiver retains about 95-96% glossy orig blue with sharp edge wear and thinning on the belly. Lever retains strong case colors on the sides with some fine freckles of rust, turning silver on the outer faces. Stock has a hairline back of the top tang and several short grain checks in the buttstock and overall retains about 95% orig varnish, heat crazed on the buttstock. Mechanics are fine, forearm shows some looseness and forward movement indicating weakened latch spring. Bore shows lightly worn rifling, having dark frosted appearance. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. 52204-1 (7,000-11,500) C&R; ESA – Lot 1117

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1122
$40,250.00

COLT PATERSON #1 BABY PERCUSSION REVOLVER WITH 4″ BARREL AND EXTRA MATCHING CYLINDER.

SN 458. Cal. 28. Blue finish with 4″ oct bbl, German silver front sight and usual 1-line left hand script letter address which reads “Patent Arms Mg Co. Paterson N.J. – Colt’s Pt.” with dashes at each end. Cylinder has 5 chambers with Centaur scene roll marking. Frame is usual configuration and is mounted with varnished 1-pc, square butt, walnut grip. Accompanied by an orig 3-handled Baby Paterson mold and additional matching cylinder. Matching SNs were observed on rear face of bbl lug, both cyls, side of trigger, cyl rotating sleeve and hammer. Gun was not further disassembled, but appears all orig. These diminutive revolvers are rarely ever encountered, and this is a nice representative orig example with good aesthetics. PROVENANCE: Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Metal is grey overall with mottled patina, discernible markings. Mechanically, fairly functional, though trigger does not fully fold out when cocked. Gun appears orig and complete with about 1-1/2″ x 1″ inset repair on left stock. Extra cylinder with matching SN has full cylinder scene and is overall plum/grey. Mold has matching mottled patina to gun with hand worn patina to handles. 51957-1 JS (25,000-35,000) – Lot 1122

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1123
$60,375.00

VERY RARE COLT PATERSON NO. 5 TEXAS HOLSTER MODEL PERCUSSION REVOLVER WITH ATTACHED RAMMER.

SN 818. Cal. 36 (actually measures .41). Blue finish with 7-1/2″ oct bbl, tiny German silver front sight with rear sight in the hammer nose. Top flat of bbl is marked “Patent Arms M’g. Co. Paterson, N.J.- Colt’s Pt.”. There is a star & snake pattern at each end of the address. Bbl lug is fitted with a 3-pc Ehlers rammer with assembly no. “125” on all 3 pieces and on bottom flat of bbl by the spring catch. Cylinder is 5-shots with rnd stop notches, rnd shoulders and the stagecoach hold-up scene roll marking. Mounted with 1-pc walnut grip that is matching numbered to this pistol. Grip has repairs to the front edge & toes. SN was observed on the wedge, rear face of bbl lug, rear face of cylinder, cylinder pin ring, rotating ring, hammer, right side of front strap under the grip, inside backstrap and in the buttstrap channel of the grip. A tiny matching number is also found on outside of buttstrap. Bore has 11 lands & grooves with right hand twist. According to various publications there were about 1,000 of this model Paterson pistol produced 1838-1840. In 1841 the Patent Arms Co. had become insolvent and creditors, including John Ehlers forced a bankruptcy sale wherein Mr. Ehlers purchased the remaining stock of Paterson revolvers with rights to assemble and sell finished pistols. He apparently assembled a few hundred Paterson, of all models, with his patented rammer including a few No. 5’s. It is also reported that a few finished revolvers that had been sold by Colt were returned for the addition of the Ehlers lever. This exact revolver is pictured as part of a cased set on page 147 of The Paterson Colt Book, Wilson & Lavett with credit to the Paul Sorrell collection. The Paterson revolver series of pistols was Colt’s first successful revolvers in the beginning of a dynasty. 150 of the No. 5 model pistols were sold to the US Navy and 180 were sold to the Republic of Texas for their Navy. Many of the Texas Navy Paterson’s were subsequently issued to the renowned Texas Rangers where they gained fame and made Colt’s fortune. Of the 1,000 No. 5 pistols produced, subtracting the US Navy & Texas Navy orders, totaling 330 pistols leaves only 670 pistols that ever made it onto the civilian market. Of those few, extraordinarily few were fitted with Ehler’s levers. The vast majority of No. 5 Texas Paterson revolvers encountered today are completely without finish and usually in relic appearance. Finding one today with orig finish and strong cylinder scene is a great rarity. PROVENANCE: The Paul Sorrell collection. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching as noted above. Bbl retains about 50% orig blue with scattered spots of fine surface rust and the loss areas a medium to dark patina. Frame retains a mostly plummy blue/brown patina with a few small spots of fine pitting and a series of small dings around the hammer screw, which is a replacement. Recoil shields are a mottled dark patina with light dings and scattered fine pitting. Cylinder is a blue/brown patina with traces of orig blue through the stagecoach hold-up scene roll marking and shows about 50% roll marking. Backstrap & buttstrap retain about 60-65% strong orig blue. Grip, with its aforementioned repaired front edges & toes has a couple of small dings on the left side and retains most of its restored finish. Mechanics are fine, strong dark bore with moderate pitting. 52511-1 JRL (75,000-125,000) – Lot 1123

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1131
$10,925.00

SCARCE COLT 2ND MODEL DRAGOON PERCUSSION REVOLVER.

SN 9980. Cal. 44. Blue and color case hardened with 7-1/2″ oct to rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line NYC address. Rammer is early type with vertical latch. Cylinder is unfluted with Dragoon/Indian fight scene roll marking and “MODEL U.S.M.R. / COLT’S PATENT” cartouches surrounding the SN. The 2nd Model Dragoon is the lowest production of all 3 models with only about 2,700 produced 1850-1851. The left front side of frame is marked “COLT’S PATENT” over a tiny “U.S.”. The square back brass trigger guard & backstrap contain a 1-pc walnut grip with matching SN in the backstrap channel. Left side of grip has a clear “JH” inspector cartouche and the right side a clear “W.A.T.” (William A. Thornton) sub-inspector cartouche. Wedge is numbered “9991”. Hammer spring is of the straight type with roller in the hammer. The contract with the government for 1,000 Dragoon revolvers was placed in Feb. 1850 with part of that contract filled from 2nd model production. Mr. Colt believing that additional contracts were forthcoming had many of the frames coming off the production line stamped with the “U.S.” on the left side. Only those revolvers with additional small inspector initials can be considered martial arms as the majority of the 2nd model production was sold on the civilian market. This revolver with its matching inspected grip and various inspector initials on individual parts most certainly was a martial arm. A large number of these arms were issued out of the San Antonio arsenal to Cavalry units and Mounted Infantry to combat the Comanche Indians, outlaws & bandits throughout the Southwest. At the outset of the Civil War, all arms at the San Antonio arenas and with troops assigned there were surrendered to the Confederacy when they continued in service throughout the war. Those arms generally saw extreme hard service afterward on the frontier and are rarely found today with high orig finish. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching except wedge as noted. Bbl retains a smooth, thinning blue finish with some evidence of modern or contemporary finish added and blended to appear original. Light pitting around the front sight. Rammer pivot retains about 40% faded case colors and the frame fading, dark mottled case colors, turned brown on the recoil shields. Hammer retains dark case colors on the left side and rear edge, turned gray on top & right edges. Cylinder is a thin blue/brown patina with scattered spots of fine pitting and shows about 90% strong Dragoon/Indian fight scene roll marking. Grip frame is a smooth light mustard patina. Grip is battered on bottom edges, but is sound with clear cartouches and retains a hand worn patina. Mechanics are fine, very bright shiny bore. Shows very little use with no visible pitting on the hammer nose or nipple recesses. A very fine example with a slight restoration. 52689-1 (8,000-12,000) – Lot 1131

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1137
$0.00

RARE CASED DAMASCENED COLT MODEL 1851 LONDON NAVY PERCUSSION REVOLVER.

SN 35232. Cal. 36. Circa 1855. Usual configuration with 7-1/2″ oct bbl, pin front sight and 1-line address “COL. COLT. LONDON” with spears. Frame is marked with a small “COLT’S PATENT”. Damascened steel trigger guard & backstrap contain a 1-pc varnished walnut grip with matching SN in backstrap channel. Entire revolver including cyl, rammer & handle, wedge, hammer, trigger guard & backstrap are beautifully damascened in 22 karat gold wire in 3 distinct patterns with intricate vines and flower blossoms in heavy gold with a dark brownish background. Cylinder is inlaid in connecting circular patterns with linear foliations. All of the damascene work has the same dark brown background. Screw heads are also damascened. Left side of bbl lug & cyl have British proofs. Accompanied by an orig English mahogany casing with empty brass plaque in the lid. Case is scarlet velvet lined and compartmented in bottom for the revolver, a Dixon “COLTS NAVY FLASK”, bag shaped flask, a blued steel 2-cavity bullet & ball “COLTS PATENT” mold with sprue cutter, an L-shaped nipple wrench, an all steel cleaning rod and a lacquered tin of Eley’s caps. There is also a functioning key. Most of the Colts so decorated had the work done in India for the RAJ or for the occasional British officer. This exact Colt is pictured on p 141 in “Colt Engraving” by R. L. Wilson. PROVENANCE: Ex Frank Russell Collection. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching. Overall retains virtually all of this fine gold damascening with the only noticeable wear on the ends of the wedge and a couple of small spots on front strap. Grip has a chipped right toe, otherwise is sound showing light edge wear and overall retains about 95% orig varnish. Mechanics are fine, strong bore with moderate pitting. Case is sound with a few light nicks & scratches and retains most of an old restored finish; interior is lightly to moderately faded with light soil in bottom and light damage from front sight & hammer spur; flask has one small dent and overall retains 70-75% orig finish; mold has numerous small nicks & dings and retains about 50% orig blue; other accessories are fine. 52634-1 JRL (20,000-30,000) – Lot 1137

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1139
$16,100.00
Revised: 10/26/2017

Please Note: Cylinder number has been re-struck.

OUTSTANDING RARE EARLY EXHIBITION QUALITY ENGRAVED COLT MODEL 1851 PERCUSSION REVOLVER.

SN 5597. Cal. 36. 7-1/2″ bbl. Rare dovetail front sight with bead and 1-line New York City address. Left side of frame is engraved “COLT’S PATENT” in an unusual postion. The silver plated brass trigger guard and backstrap contains a beautifully figured burl walnut with varnished 1-pc grip with last three digits of SN in backstrap channel. Revolver is engraved with full coverage foliate arabesque pattern with a small cross-hatched panel on each side all with shaded background. Engraving extends over bbl lug and onto rammer pivot with a fine border over the muzzle. Hammer is engraved to match. Backstrap, butt strap and trigger guard are also engraved to match. All screwheads are lightly engraved in matching patterns. Cylinder is usual 6-shot with Ormsby naval battle scene and five of the safety pins are mostly serviceable. These fancifully embellished Colt firearms have frequently been attributed to The Crystal Palace Exhibition of 1851. Based upon the production date, this could well be a distinct possibility. CONDITION: Very fine as bbl retains about 80% glossy blue with sharp edge wear and light flaking. Rammer retains faded case colors in sheltered areas. Balance has somewhat turned silver. Frame and hammer are a mostly grey metal color. Cylinder is clean, grey metal color with a few prominent scratches and retains overall 60-70% of the Ormsby naval battle scene. Trigger guard retains most all of its silver finish as backstrap retains over 50% of its silver. Grip
is very fine and retains most of its crisp deluxe varnish. Mechanics are crisp. All visible numbers have been found to be matching. Bore is very good with strong rifling and slight spotting from age. This is truly an exceptional example of Colt’s artistry. 52705-3 TDW (15,000-25,000) – Lot 1139

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1151
$13,800.00

EXTRAORDINARY CASED COLT MODEL 1862 POLICE PERCUSSION REVOLVER.

SN 4197. Cal. 36. Blue and color case hardened with 4-1/2″ rnd bbl, brass pin front sight and 1-line New-York U.S. America address. It has “COLTS PATENT” on left side of frame and Cal. marking on left shoulder of trigger guard. Cylinder is half fluted and rebated with 5 chambers and all 5 safety pins serviceable. The silver plated trigger guard and back strap contain a nicely figured, varnished, 1-pc walnut grip that has the SN in back strap channel. Accompanied by an orig burgundy velvet lined mahogany Colt casing compartmentalized in the bottom for the revolver, a dbl sided eagle and stars “E PLURIBUS UNUM” flask, a blued steel 2-cavity bullet and ball “COLT’S PATENT” mold with sprue cutter that is marked on right side “36P”, an L-shaped nipple wrench, a lacquered tin of Eley’s caps and a functioning key. Given that this revolver was produced during the early years of the Civil War and survived in unused condition is just short of miraculous. Then to further survive the great Manifest Destiny westward expansion still in unused condition, is even more astounding. Most of this model revolver saw hard service throughout the Civil War and on the American frontier and are rarely ever found with much orig finish. They remained in service well into the 1870s and even 1880s until supplanted by the “new” cartridge revolvers. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus, all matching including wedge and grip, probably un-fired. Bbl retains about 65-70% dark glossy orig blue with the loss areas flaked, not worn, to a medium patina. The rammer and handle retain brilliant, vivid case colors as does the frame and hammer. The cylinder retains about 90-92% dark glossy orig blue with a few flaked spots and retains about all of its orig blue on it’s front face and in chambers. All 5 safety pins are serviceable. The trigger guard and back strap retain virtually all of their orig silver plating with one small scrape on front strap, exposing brass. Back strap silver is slightly thinned. Grip is crisp with sharp edges and no discernible flaws and retains virtually all of its bright orig varnish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Case has one grain check in lid, otherwise is completely sound with very minor storage and handling mars in the finish and retains virtually all of its orig factory varnish. Interior is heavily faded with moderate soil with one slightly loose partition. Flask is crisp, retaining virtually all of its orig factory finish. Mold is equally new with some minor flaking on right handle. Cap tin shows soil and staining to the label. Altogether an outstanding cased set that would be difficult to duplicate. 52267-1 (12,500-17,500) – Lot 1151

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1155
$0.00
Revised: 10/17/2017

Please Note: This revolver is a Richards-Mason conversion of the 1860 Army, not a 1871/72 open top revolver as stated in the catalog.

SCARCE COLT MODEL 1871/72 OPEN TOP SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER IDENTIFIED TO A MAN WANTED FOR MURDER.

SN 6923. Cal. 44 Colt. Usual configuration with 8″ rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left side of frame has 2-line patent dates and left shoulder trigger guard is marked “44 CAL”. Cylinder is usual rebated style with re-rolled Ormsby naval battle scene marking. SNs on the bbl, frame, trigger guard and buttstrap are all matching which last 3 digits of matching number on the cylinder. Backstrap channel of the grip has a coating of dark dried oil with obscures any numbers present. Mounted with varnished 1-pc walnut grip that has had both toes replaced. Revolver has been cleaned with the appearance of having been on a wire wheel. There were about 7,000 of these revolvers produced 1872-1873. Accompanied by a letter bearing the signature of George F. White, US Marshal, Southern District of Georgia, dated February 5, 1913. This letter states in effect that this revolver was taken from the body of L. L. Williams who was being served papers by Mr. White. Apparently Mr. Williams resisted arrest and was killed by Deputy US Marshal J.A. Kelly. CONDITION: Fair to good, all matching except grip as noted above. No orig finish remains being an overall cleaned, bright metal finish with fine pitting. Grip, with its repaired toes is otherwise sound showing light to moderate edge wear and retains most of its bright, custom varnish finish. Wedge appears to be an un-numbered replacement and the wedge screw is battered. Ejector rod head is a replacement. Mechanics are fine, strong dark bore. 52487-1 JRL (3,500-5,000) – Lot 1155

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1157
$51,750.00

EXTREMELY RARE ENGRAVED AND NICKEL PLATED COLT MEDIUM FRAME LIGHTNING RIFLE THAT BELONGED TO PORFIRIO DIAZ.

SN 3543. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Full nickel finish with 20″ bbl, full magazine and barleycorn front sight with blued, reverse mounted 900 yard ladder rear sight. Mounted with exceptional Italian walnut buttstock that has checkered straight grip and carbine buttplate without trap. Left side of receiver has a stud & ring and the trigger guard has a safety. Forearm is of 2 pieces, double Schnable checkered hard rubber with the Rampant Colt trademark logo on each side. Underneath top tang has matching SN with matching SN in pencil on rear face of buttstock, under the buttplate and also inside the toe of buttplate. Carbine is incredibly engraved by master engraver Cuno Helfricht with about full coverage on the receiver & top tang. Engraving consists of the large vignette of a cowboy, that resembles Buffalo Bill Cody, roping a bull buffalo in a prairie scene on the left side, a standing bull elk on the right side and the engraved Rampant Colt logo on top rear of the receiver. All the vignettes are surrounded by extremely well executed foliate arabesque patterns with extremely fine pearled background. The areas in front & behind the loading gate recess have extremely fine diamond & dot patterns with a matching diamond pattern over the receiver ring. Each side of the front edge of the receiver is engraved in a small shell pattern. Top tang is engraved with a fan pattern around the hammer slot with foliate arabesque patterns down the tang. Trigger plate & trigger bow are engraved in foliate arabesque patterns and geometric patterns with smaller patterns on the bottom tang. Bottom tang is engraved in period script, also by Mr. Helfricht “Porf. Diaz”. Buttplate tang & heel are engraved to match. This carbine is pictured, both sides & bottom tang, in full color on page 493 of The Colt Engraving Book Volume One, Wilson, in the Cuno Helfricht section of that publication. The medium frame Lightning rifle was Colt’s first attempt at producing a pump action firearm. They made almost 90,000 between 1884-1902. Of that number only a limited few were carbines and of those exceedingly few were so elaborately engraved with special plating. CONDITION: Very fine to extremely fine, all matching. Bbl & magazine tube retain 97-98% strong orig nickel with some fine pimpling in a couple of spots on the bbl. Receiver retains about 90% strong orig nickel with losses from flaking, not wear on the right side. Top & bottom tangs, trigger guard & trigger plate retain virtually all of their strong, orig nickel. Buttplate retains about 60% orig nickel with the losses from flaking not wear. Buttstock has handling and storage nicks & scratches and retains about 90% strong orig varnish. Forearm has a couple tiny bruises on the left rear edge and shows light diamond point wear, turned chocolate on the left side. Mechanics are crisp, strong bore with sharp rifling and moderate pitting. 52428-1 JRL (25,000-45,000) – Lot 1157

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1158
$74,750.00

*EXTREMELY RARE TRANSITIONAL COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER IN A SCARCE CALIBER FACTORY ENGRAVED BY WILBUR GLAHN WITH IVORY GRIPS AND FACTORY LETTER.

SN 341804. Cal. 44 Russian & S&W Special. Nickel finish with 5-1/2″ bbl, full thick front sight with V-notch rear sight in the top strap. Left side of the bbl has the roll marked caliber “RUSSIAN AND S&W SPECIAL 44”. Left front side of frame has 2-line 3-patent dates and the Rampant Colt trademark. Mounted with very beautiful 2-pc ivory grips that have deep left & right Colt medallions. SN was observed on the bottom front of frame and on the left side of the front & backstraps under the grip. Rear face of the cylinder has last 4 digits of matching SN. This revolver is beautifully engraved by Wilbur Glahn in about B-style which consists of about 50% coverage extremely well executed foliate arabesque patterns with nearly full coverage on the frame, recoil shield & loading gate. Top strap is engraved in extremely well executed leaf & vine patterns with beautiful, simple arabesque patterns on the bbl which extend from the frame to the front sight, surrounding the 1-line block letter address. Ejector housing is engraved with a snake pattern in the top gullet with extremely well executed geometric patterns on the outer radius. Each side of the frame bbl boss is engraved with Mr. Glahn’s distinctive V-shape pattern which are also found at the top of the backstrap and on the heel & toe of the grip frame. Buttstrap is engraved in a light arabesque pattern with an extremely detailed hunters star on the trigger bow. Cylinder is engraved to match with a continuous running foliate arabesque pattern between & behind the flutes. Rear edge of the cylinder has a double wavy line border pattern. Rear edges of the frame on each side of the hammer slot are engraved in feather patterns with very nicely shaded background. Wilbur Glahn began working for Colt in 1919 and was greatly influenced by the master engraver Cuno Helfricht which shows in much of the extremely fine detail found on this revolver, particularly in the very fine shading & crisp, sharp cuts. The pearled background found in the engraving on the frame is very consistent and even, also an influence by Mr. Helfricht which was not so noticeable on Mr. Glahn’s later work. The leaf & vine patterns on the top strap of this revolver and the arabesque patterns on the bbl are also indicative of Mr. Helfricht’s influence and are reminiscent of the early leaf & vine patterns found on his work on early percussion Colt’s. A review of the book Colt Engraving, Wilson, in the Wilbur Glahn section, disclosed several other similarly engraved revolvers, but few with such simple artistic beauty as found on this one. Accompanied by a Colt Factory letter which identifies this revolver in caliber 44 S&W, with 5-1/2″ bbl, nickel finish, ivory stocks & factory engraved, shipped to Baker, Hamilton, Pacific Co., San Francisco, CA / Ellery Arms Co. on May 9, 1921 in a 1-gun shipment. Also accompanied by a 1-page letter by renowned Colt Historian, author & researcher, the late R.L. Wilson wherein he discusses the Cuno Helfricht / Wilbur Glahn transition engraved pieces which he states are the best work by Mr. Glahn. A very similar example of this rare transitional work is seen in Wilson & Hables book of Colt pistols on page 216 and 217 further describing the rarity of these embellished arms. This is truly an exceptional work by Mr. Glahn. PROVENANCE: Vince Sepulveda Collection. CONDITION: Excellent plus, all matching . Overall retains about 99% plus crisp, orig nickel with only a very light cylinder line and a couple small spots of flaking under the grips. Grips are excellent with a few age lines and show a beautiful golden ivory patina. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore, new & unfired. Possibly a one of one ever produced. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. 52598-1 (75,000-125,000) C&R; ESA – Lot 1158

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1159
$0.00

*EXTREMELY RARE FACTORY ENGRAVED COLT OFFICER’S MODEL FLAT TOP TARGET REVOLVER WITH BOX AND FACTORY LETTER.

SN 20240. Cal 22. Blue finish with 6″ tapered rnd bbl. Adjustable Patridge target front sight and adjustable rear sight in a dovetail in the top flat of the frame. Bbl has standard for the period 2-line address on top and is marked “COLT OFFICERS/MODEL .22 LONG RIFLE” on the left side. Left side plate has the Colt trademark Rampant Colt. Trigger is checkered and all blue finish while the hammer is polished bright on the sides with blued top & rear edges. Top flat of the frame and rear of the frame are matte finish and the backstrap is checkered. Revolver is engraved by William Gough with class “B” coverage of about 60% of the revolvers surface. Engraving consists of fine arabesque scrolls with pearled background. Revolver is mounted with factory 2-pc pearl grips that have left & right Rampant Colt silver medallions and a raised carved eagle on the right side. Accompanied by a Colt factory letter which identifies this revolver in caliber 22 with 6″ bbl, blue finish, pearl stocks, class “B” engraving and shipped to Loan Account,(These rare loan account guns were the Colt Exhibition guns and were shipped for display purposes to selected and important Colt Dealers to exhibit the BEST Colt had to offer.) Spaulding W. Arms, Salt Lake City, Utah on May 31, 1938 in a one gun shipment. Remarks section indicates that the revolver was returned to the factory on Feb 1, 1939 and shipped 6 additional times to businesses in Albany, NY, Indianapolis, IN, Jamestown, NY, Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL and Jenkintown, PA and was finally sold on April 5, 1940 to the Bacharach Raisin Company in Baltimore, MD. Also accompanied by an orig burgundy hinged lid cardboard box with black & white end label identifying this revolver. Additionally there are 3 black & white overlabels, 2 on the end of the lid “TARGET” and “PATRIDGE SIGHTS”. The 3rd label is diagonally over the top “ENGRAVED” from which “EN” is missing. This exact revolver is pictured on page 330 of The Book of Colt Engraving, Wilson and on page 306 of Colt Pistols, Wilson & Hable wherein they state that it is “one of the most traveled of sample guns”. Wilson also states that this box was shipped 6 or 7 times and shows the travel wear but protected the gun during its travels. To say that this revolver is beautiful is a gross understatement. It is exceptionally beautiful and exceedingly rare. Accompanied by a copy of the Wilson & Hable book in which this outstanding revolver is pictured. PROVENANCE: R.E. Hable Collection, Vince Sepulveda Collection. CONDITION: Excellent, appears to be new and unfired showing no evidence whatsoever of having been fired. There is only the most faint cylinder line and a small spot or two on left side of the trigger. Grips are excellent, showing great fire and color. Box has worn edges and a couple of broken corners with the right end of the top partially detached, otherwise it is intact with mostly legible labels. This is the rare opportunity to own one of the most rare Colt’s extant. 52329-2 (22,500-27,500) C&R – Lot 1159

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1166
$37,375.00

EXCEPTIONAL CLARK INSPECTED COLT CAVALRY SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER.

SN 55629. Cal. 45 Colt. Blue and color cased hardened with 7-1/2″ bbl, full front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left side of the frame has 3-line patent dates and “U.S.”. Mounted with matching numbered, oil finish 1-pc walnut grip that has oval “DAL” (Lt. David A. Lyle) inspector cartouche under the date “1880” on the left side and a rectangular “DFC” (David F. Clark) sub-inspector cartouche on the right. Mr. Clark’s initials also appear on the bottom right edge of the grip, on the cylinder, bottom of the bbl and bottom of the frame adjacent to the SN. Frame, trigger guard and buttstrap have full matching SNs and the bbl, cylinder and grip, in the backstrap channel, are marked with the last 4 digits of matching SN. Ejector housing is 2nd Type with bullseye ejector rod head and orig bronze colored spring. Base pin is orig type with dimpled ends. This revolver was among the early part of the 4th Contract produced in 1880. Several revolvers from this early 4th Contract are known to have been issued to both the 6th and 7th Cavalry as well as the Philippines Cebu police. The fact that this revolver remains in orig configuration with high orig conditioning attests to it having escaped the recalls of the 1890’s and early 20th century where thousands of cavalry revolvers were returned to both Colt and Springfield Arsenal for conversion to artillery configuration. This is one of the finest Lyle/Clark inspected Cavalry revolvers extant. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus, all matching as noted above. Bbl retains 95-96% strong, glossy orig blue with distinct “feathers” on each side of the front sight and each side of the ejector housing stud. Frame retains about 98-99% crisp, bright, orig case colors with only faint sharp edge wear and some slight fading on the recoil shield and loading gate. Screws retain virtually all of their orig fire blue. Hammer retains about all of its orig case colors, moderately faded. Trigger guard and backstrap retain most of their orig factory blue with sharp edge wear and some dulling of the backstrap. Cylinder retains about 95% strong orig blue, lightly thinned on the outer diameter, strong and bright in the flutes. Chambers retain virtually all of their orig factory blue. Grip is sound with a few minor nicks and dings on the right side showing light edge wear and overall retains most of its orig oil finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny showing most of its orig blue bore with no evidence of ever having been fired. 51857-1 JRL (20,000-30,000) – Lot 1166

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1175
$0.00

*EXTREMELY RARE COLT PRE-WAR – POST-WAR SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER ASSEMBLED PRE-WAR BUT NOT SHIPPED UNTIL 1962 WITH ORIGINAL INVOICE, POST-WAR BLACK BOX, SHIPPING SLEEVE, AND FACTORY LETTER.

SN 356850. Cal. 45 Colt. Nickel finish with 5-1/2″ bbl, full thick front sight, 1-line block letter address and Model/Cal. marking on left side. Left front side of frame is marked with 2-line 3-patent dates and the Rampant Colt trademark. Mounted with Rampant Colt hard rubber grips. Accompanied by a Colt Factory letter which identifies this revolver in caliber 45 with 5-1/2″ bbl, nickel finish, type of stocks not listed and shipped to Don Glaser, Emporia, KS on February 6, 1962 in a 1-gun shipment. In the remarks section “Records indicate this firearm was assembled on April 8, 1940 and later shipped as noted above, indicating that it was definitely a pre World War II weapon.”. Also accompanied by a copy of an express receipt from Colt dated February 6, 1962 in the name of Don Glaser, Emporia, KS. Additionally accompanied by 2 copies of a Colt Factory invoice also made out to Mr. Glaser for this revolver identified by caliber & SN. An additional accompaniment is a typewritten letter to Mr. Glaser from Mr. Jim Wilson of Denton, TX inquiring about the history of this revolver which he states he had recently traded for. The back of this letter is Mr. Glaser’s response to Mr. Wilson, handwritten wherein he states that he traded this gun to John Rohner of Boulder, CO, he further states that he had purchased it directly from Colt and had never pulled the hammer. Mr. Glaser and Mr. Rohner were the inventors & marketers of the Gravermeister Pneumatic Engraving Machine. Finally accompanied by the orig post-war black hinged lid box with gold & black end label and a blue & white “NICKEL FINISH” label. Bottom of the box has the handwritten brick red grease pencil SN that matches this revolver. This box contains an owners pamphlet, warranty card & “Handling the Handgun” pamphlet. Inside the box also has the orig tan tissue paper & wire handle bristle brush and is all contained in the orig cardboard shipping sleeve with blue & yellow Colt label addressed to Mr. Glaser in Emporia, KS with the hand stamps “EXPRESS COLLECT”. One additional accompaniment is the book COLT’S SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER PRE-WAR POST-WAR MODEL, Wilkerson with personalized presentation to Roger Perlock expressing appreciation for his help with this book and that a revolver from his personal collection is featured within, dated April 1991. Page 16 of this publication is a full page black & white photo of this revolver which lists manufacturing & shipping dates with credit to The Roger Perlock collection. Page 47 of this publication is a reproduction of the shipping invoice for this revolver. Page 19 of this publication states that there were only 6 revolvers found to have been assembled before World War II, but not shipped until the 1950s and 1960s. This is an exceptional & rare Single Action, the likes of which are unlikely to be offered again in this lifetime. PROVENANCE: Vince Sepulveda Collection. CONDITION: Excellent. Overall retains 99% plus crisp, orig nickel with only a faint bit of evidence that the cylinder has ever been turned. Right side of frame, just forward of the grip, has a small ding, otherwise the finish is flawless. Grips are equally crisp & new. The action was not cycled to check the mechanics or condition of the bore as it is readily apparent that it has never been fired. The box & paperwork are equally crisp & new. Book is excellent. 52598-2 (15,000-20,000) C&R – Lot 1175

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1176
$15,525.00

*COLT PRE-WWII SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER WITH SPECIAL GRIPS, ORIGINAL BOX AND FACTORY LETTER.

SN 350802. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Blue and color case hardened with 5-1/2″ bbl, full thick front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left side of bbl is marked “COLT FRONTIER SIX SHOOTER 44-40”. Left side of frame has 2-line 3-patent dates and Rampant Colt without a circle. Mounted with scarce Fleur-de-lis and diamond checkered, silver medallion, 2-pc walnut grips. Inside each grip is marked in pencil “4”. SN was observed on bottom front of frame and right side of front and back straps, under the grip. Accompanied by it’s orig, matching numbered, hinged lid burgundy cardboard box with black & white end label and a small blue over-label that is mostly illegible. The label inside the lid is pasted over a second label and is upside down. Box also contains a wire-handled bristle brush. Additionally accompanied by a Colt factory letter dated March 10, 1961 and addressed to renowned collector Mr. George Lewis of Kansas City, MO. The letter states that this revolver was in Cal. 44 with 5-1/2″ bbl, blue finish and checkered wood stocks, shipped to W. S. Brown, Pittsburgh, PA on October 7, 1927. It is rather uncommon to find these pre-war single actions with their orig box in such high condition. Also accompanied by a Smith & Wesson style hinged lid mahogany case with dovetail corners and yellow felt lining. PROVENANCE: George Lewis. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus, all matching except cylinder which is properly un-numbered and grips as noted. Overall retains about 99% plus crisp orig finish with brilliant case colors on the frame in sheltered areas, lightly to moderately faded elsewhere. Screws retain virtually all of their crisp orig blue. Hammer retains brilliant case colors, turned a little dark on top edge. Grip frame retains virtually all of its orig blue as does the cylinder. Grips are crisp, fit extremely well and are probably orig to this gun showing only faint diamond point wear. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Appears to be new and unfired. Box is sound showing moderate edge wear and light soil. Mahogany case is fine. 52527-11 (12,000-18,000) C&R – Lot 1176

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1230
$8,625.00

BEAUTIFUL GOLD AND PLATINUM INLAID REMINGTON ROLLING BLOCK IVORY MOUNTED SINGLE-SHOT PISTOL.

SN 4. Cal. 50. Pretty much follows configuration of Model 1867 Navy pistol with 2-stage oct-rnd with cannon muzzle bbl. A majority of metal surfaces are inlaid with arabesque gold and platinum inlays with gold inset address “E REMINGTON & SONS, ILION, NEW-YORK U.S.A”. Breech is inset with a 1″ American eagle with shield and 15 stars on rounded breech. This is quite a showpiece and very similar to a pair of Model 1865’s pictured on pg 328 of The William M. Locke Collection, 1973. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Gun appears orig and all matching with SN “4” found internally on bbl, frame, trigger guard and nicely inked in trigger guard channel of 1-pc grip. Gun retains about 95% of its blue finish overall, with areas of thinning and pinprick pitting. Gun shows substantial pitted areas under ivory forestock and internally in grip strap frame. Gold and platinum inlays are virtually all intact with minor cosmetic blemishes. Gold address and gold inset eagle are well defined. Orig antique elephant ivory stocks are sound and well fit with golden ivory patina. Butt of grip has old sanding, possibly removal of an old inscription. Mechanically sound with shiny crisp blued bore. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. 52255-1 JS (5,000-7,500) ESA – Lot 1230

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1244
$103,500.00

EXTREMELY RARE COFER PORTSMOUTH, VIRGINIA, PERCUSSION CONFEDERATE REVOLVER, FINEST EXAMPLE KNOWN, WITH AN ORIGINAL COFER HOLSTER.

SN 11. Cal. 36. One of the true rarities and among the most coveted revolvers in Confederate collecting is the brass framed percussion revolver made in Portsmouth, Virginia by Thomas W. Cofer. There are 13 known percussion specimens plus an additional three made for special percussion cartridges. These percussion models were true martial Confederate pistols being contracted by the 5th Virginia Cavalry. 82 revolvers were contracted and delivered in January and May of 1862. Several of the few extant examples are heavily restored. Existing percussion Cofers are either uniquely numbered or lettered; existing authentic examples are 1, 11, 13, 59, F, L, M, N, T, V and three examples with no number or letter; 5 of 13 examples are in museums and one is unknown since 1934. An excavated frame SN 10 was found near Macon, GA in 1955. SN 11 is by far the finest example known and was the prize revolver of renown Confederate collector Fred Edmunds prior to purchase by Morris Racker. For a Confederate revolver, this is a truly magnificent example with crisp markings, strong traces of orig finish and smooth,beautifully patinaed brass frame. This revolver has only been in two collections since it left the family who had it since the war. There is a large file with provenance and history on this gun and the orig Cofer holster. The orig Cofer holster originated with Serial “F” and was added in 2003. PROVENANCE: Charles Frederick, Gettysburg, PA; Fred Edmunds, 1992; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 2008. CONDITION: Overall very good plus, excellent for a Confederate handgun. All matching and complete. SN 1l is found on top of cyl pin, left side of loading lever, left side of plunger, bottom of bbl, front of frame, hammer on left side, trigger on left side, sideplate, grip screw, rear of cyl between cones, both frame screws on left side and other two screws in frame are stamped with “1”. Both lever screws are SNd “11”. Gun is marked on brass top strap “T.W. COFER’S / PATENT” and on top bbl flat “PORTSMOUTH VA”. Gun is overall “as found” with iron surfaces overall smooth brown/plum, light pitting and scattered small blemishes. Loading assembly has strong traces of orig finish, especially bright on plunger. Traces of blue are still seen on bbl, though mostly plum. Frame has smooth mustard patina with several small scratches and dents. Grips are sound and fit well with hand worn patina, base of each grip has about 1/8″ x 1/2″ inset where a lanyard was possibly fit light edge wear and light tacking. Single initial “F” is scratched into buttstrap. The orig Cofer holster is well worn and has a gilted Civil War eagle “I” button as finial so often seen on Confederate holsters. Holster displays gun well and fits nicely though muzzle protrudes. 51957-22 JS (100,000-150,000) – Lot 1244

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1245
$51,750.00

VERY FINE AND RARE, EARLY CONFEDERATE DANCE ARMY REVOLVER, SERIAL NUMBER 14.

SN 14. Cal. 44. This is a very fine orig, authentic & complete early specimen of the Confederate Dance Brothers revolver, probably made at East Columbia, TX in July 1862 before moving to Anderson, TX according to Dance expert Gary Wiggins, author of Dance & Brothers Texas Gunmakers of the Confederacy,1986. Dance made approx 325 or so Dragoon-sized Army Revolvers of which less than 90 are known to have survived. Dance Revolvers are much like Colt Dragoons in appearance with the exception of the lack of recoil shields. Dance Revolvers, like other Confederates, saw hard use and rarely are found this nice and complete. Indeed, this is among the finest examples known. This gun conforms to the normal configuration having a 7-7/8″ half oct-rnd bbl with low brass blade front sight. This gun is properly SNd with matching number “14” found in all areas normally SNd which include bbl housing, frame, trigger guard, backstrap, cyl, arbor, grips, loading arm and loading arm latch. The hammer is classic Dance being similar to a Colt Dragoon but without the knurling that Colt put on the spur and SNed 14 on right side. Overall, edges are crisp & sharp, metal is smooth with a beautiful plum color overall where orig blue has turned. Mechanically, gun functions well and exhibits good crisp rifling to bore. By NRA standards, this gun grades Good to Very Good, but by Confederate standards, this gun is Excellent. All screws, cones, sight and internal parts appear orig, even the wedge screw which is often lost appears orig. Accompanying this revolver are letters of provenance and authenticity by Fred Edmunds and Gary Wiggins, as well as special limited edition No. 14 leather bound Dance & Brothers 1988 text by Wiggins, signed by the author and the two living Dance descendants at time of publication. PROVENANCE: Donald Sayrs, West Collingswood, NJ, purchased gun from Texan at unknown date though he states “many years ago” in his 1961 letter; Collection of Ashley Halsey, Charleston, SC, 1961; Pictured on pages 36-37 of Gary Wiggins’ “Dance & Brothers Texas Gunmakers of the Confederacy”; Fred Edmunds; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 2000. CONDITION: Very good overall, excellent for a Confederate revolver. Gun shows light use with all safety pins intact. Gun appears 100% orig with exception of non-serialized Colt-style spring wedge that Edmunds refers to in his letter as potentially of contemporary replacement. According to letter from Wiggins, main spring and hand spring are replacements. This may be reason for gun being so fine and showing so light use. A vertical hairline crack is found on the right side of the frame through forward frame screw which is seen on several other early Dances which does not affect aesthetics or functionality. SNs are all well-struck and fully discernible. Metal surfaces overall are brown/plum with scattered areas of staining & pitting. Brass backstrap and trigger guard have light mustard patina with minor cosmetic blemishes. Grips are sound & solid, well fit with edge wear, hand worn patina with light cosmetic blemishes, still retaining traces of orig thin varnish. Mechanically, gun functions well with crisp rifling in bore. 51957-18 JS (40,000-60,000) – Lot 1245

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1261
$25,875.00

UNIQUE CONFEDERATE C.H. RIGDON 5″ BARRELED REVOLVER.

NSN. Cal. 36. For the Confederate handgun collector who wants every model, this is the only “Pocket Sized” revolver known. There are only 6 C.H. Rigdon marked pistols known and the other 5 are all standard Navy models with 7-1/2″ bbls. This gun is pictured in William Albaugh’s text Confederate Arms,1957. Albaugh comments that in his opinion, “This is the arm from which the Rigdon-Ansley were modeled.” In Frank Seller’s and Sam Smith’s book American Percussion Revolvers Sam Smith states that he believed this gun to have been Charles Rigdon’s personal gun. This gun has remained in the same collection for all these years until 2013. Regardless of the thoughts of these respected early authors on Confederate arms, studying the other Rigdon revolvers known, I have little doubt that this gun was made near the end of production. There is no doubt this gun was made as a 5″ barreled revolver and is not simply a “cut-down” Navy revolver. The cylinder is over 5% shorter than standard production Rigdon & Ansley revolvers. The back of frame and arbor are correspondingly milled to accept this shorter cylinder. In the opinion of this cataloger, this gun, like a few late Griswold’s and Spiller & Burr’s, were privately purchased and had non-military features such as special finishes and higher grade grips, such as the burled and varnished grips seen on this unique gun. The loading assembly latch, bbl catch and front sight are identically made to those seen on late production Rigdon & Ansley’s, further substantiating the originality and authenticity of this unique revolver. There is only one other identically marked “CH RIGDON” revolver and it is among the highest SN of standard Rigdon & Ansley production, 2316. One other “CH RIGDON” gun is known, also marked “AUGUSTA GA”, that being SN 1490, which is among the earliest 12 stop revolvers (1482 is lowest SN known, no maker’s mark). Three other “CSA” marked and inspected “CH RIGDON, AUGUSTA GA” standard Navy revolvers are known (SN 2154, 2180 and 2182). Two features that stand out substantiating this gun as late production are the “milled cap release channel” and wedge is “non-spring” type (first seen approximately SN 2150). When Herman Stumpf sold his gun collection in the 1950’s he only retained this unique 5″ “pocket sized” revolver he felt was Charles Rigdon’s personal gun. This gun is in wonderful condition for a Confederate revolver. PROVENANCE: Herman Stumpf collection; pictured pg 13 Albaugh “Confederate Arms’, 1957; pictured and described in Sellers & Smith “American Percussion Revolvers”, 1971; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Appears all orig and authentic with exception of lap welded repair to mainspring and missing screw in backstrap. Metal overall is gray with tiny traces of blue finish in protected areas with scattered staining and pitting. Brass backstrap and trigger guard have mustard colored patina. Stocks retain 40-50% of their orig varnish. Rifling in bbl is well defined, though pitted overall. Gun functions mechanically though mainspring is weak. There are discernible tool marks on frame, bbl and cyl, typical of other late production guns. Maker’s mark on bbl is easily discerned, as can be seen in photos. A rebound of die can be seen in a ghost of some letters, this is noted also on other examples as marking identical on all. There are no other external marks but internally there are a pair of punch marks on wedge and backstrap. There is a large punch mark on left side of trigger guard that possibly removed “cryptic” often seen stamped on standard production Augusta made revolvers. 51957-2 JS (30,000-40,000) – Lot 1261

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1339
$109,250.00
Revised: 10/17/2017

Please Note: The correct spelling is Hawken not Hawkens.

ICONIC AND HISTORIC SILVER MOUNTED HAWKEN RIFLE OF GEORGE W. ATCHISON, ST. LOUIS, MO, 1836.

NSN. Cal. 52. This is no doubt the finest and most elaborate of all Hawkens rifles. This gun has never left the family descent of E.R. Butterworth who obtained the gun on his travels west in the 1870’s until now. This gun had previously been on public display at the Cody Firearms Museum for the past 20 years. This gun is orig and complete in every regard. This earliest form of Hawkens pre-dates their famous plains rifles. This gun was made during the “Mountain Man” era where few Hawkens products are known and none as elaborate or as fine as this example which measures 53-1/2″ overall with 37″ full oct bbl with 3 gold bands at breech and muzzle, browned finish, inset silver engraved maker’s mark “J & S HAWKENS”, dovetailed German silver front sight, full buckhorn rear sight on 3″ spring extension. Silver inlaid plaque on paneled cheekpiece engraved “G W ATCHISON / ST LOUIS / 1836”. The gun is totally silver mounted, including ramrod pipes, thimble, nosecap, forend wear plate, trigger guard, escutcheons for each key, buttplate, buttplate extensions, 4-pc patchbox, presentation plaque on paneled cheekpiece, plus 10 more decorative silver insets. In addition to silver mountings, there are an additional 6 mother-of-pearl scrimshawed insets and a horn oval inset between trigger guard and pierced silver buttplate extension which contains push button to open lid. Most silver is engraved with floral and geometric scrolls as is steel breech tang, hammer and “Golcher” lock and set trigger. Lock is attached via face by sgl screw into the steel breech tang. All screws are also engraved. Wood ramrod has iron threaded end for worm and silver plated brass tip.

George W. Atchison first came West from Vermont in 1830 as a private in the US Army fighting along the rivers during the Black Hawk War (1831-1832). It is interesting to note that private steamers were used by the Army during the war. Atchison established himself as a well known steamboat captain and boat builder on the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers not long after his army service. He first secured a clerkship on the steamship “Winnebago” when it came up from St. Louis to Armstrong in the Fall of 1832; the next summer he commanded The Winnebago himself and ran her in the St. Louis and Galena trade. In 1834, he commanded the steamer “Iowa” and later “Dubuque”, both in the upper river trade. The next year found him on the Lower Mississippi commanding “The Belle of Missouri” which he built in the winter of 1834-35. This ship sunk on its first trip by collision with another steamer. According to his obituary from a Davenport, IA newspaper Quad-City Times. This was “the beginning of enough bad luck to discourage a saint.”. In 1835, he built the steamer “George Collier”, she was too big to pass through the locks at Louisville, KY. In 1838, he built the steamer “Governor Dodge”, she sunk at Island 21 that Fall. The then built the steamer “Corsican” which sunk above Baton Rouge, LA”. Atchison went on to build other boats including the double engine “Amaranth” for the New Orleans trade. On May 1, 1843, he loaded almost 500 tons of cargo on the ship made to carry 200 tons; he did make it to New Orleans. No wonder so many of his ships litter the Mississippi and Missouri River basins. Atchison obviously made a very good living as he was able to buy the most magnificent Jacob & Samuel Hawken rifle of its day. Atchison did retire in 1853 selling his last ships and retired to a fine farm in Missouri. Read the various newspaper clippings on line; it’s amazing how many ships he built and sunk and the massive amounts of cargo he transported.

It is interesting to note that a fluted anchor is among the engraved designs found in the finial of the patchbox, no doubt representing Atchison’s maritime history. PROVENANCE: George W. Atchison, 1836; E.R. Butterworth about 1870; Butterworth family descents. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Gun is complete and orig. Half of one ear of rear sight is broken and there is a contemporary to time of use repaired wood chip just forward of lock which is backed internally with well patinaed piece of cloth. Remainder of stock is well fit with one crack opposite lock. Checkered wrist is worn. Areas of dark orig varnish are found mostly in protected areas. Bbl is overall plum/brown with minor cosmetic blemishes. Iron lockplate, hammer and breech have traces of case colors, overall a dark silver/grey. Silver mounts have light patina. Reinforced iron tip at top of silver buttplate has dark iron patina. All insets are complete and intact though one mother-of-pearl “leaf” forward of presentation plaque is cracked. Engraving on silver mostly crisp with some wear on forearm wear plate. Mechanically functional with crisp 7-groove rifled bore. 52461-1 JS (80,000-100,000) – Lot 1339

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1345
$18,400.00

RARE AND FINEST KNOWN EXAMPLE OF AFRICAN AMERICAN GUNSMITH JAMES M. JONES PERCUSSION DERRINGER.

NSN. Cal. 38. Beautiful and rare pocket derringer with 2-7/8″ ovoid shaped Damascus bbl, dovetailed front sight with silver or platinum blade and fixed rear sight on top tang. Top flat of bbl is engraved “J.M. JONES”. Breech plug is inlaid with two wide gold bands and has an engraved screaming eagle’s head in between. Back action lock is engraved in tiny letters “J. M. JONES” above fine delicate scrolls en suite with delicate serpentine shaped flat sided, square edged hammer and decorative scalloped bolster with platinum blow-out plug. Mounted in a 1-pc walnut stock with schnable tip and secured with a sgl wedge through dog-bone shaped silver escutcheons. Pistol is silver mounted with a tapered trigger guard that is engraved with panoply of arms with two different American shields framed with floral sprays. Trigger plate has an elaborately engraved silver pineapple finial. Top of wrist has an empty inlaid rectangular gold thumbplate with cut corners. Sideplate has Mr. Jones’ distinctive sweeping floral design, also lightly engraved. Buttcap has a pinned teardrop shaped silver plate with an engraved triangular silver plate in tip of forestock. Grip is finely checkered in Mr. Jones’ usual patterns.

James Monroe Jones, or James “Gunsmith” Jones, was an exceptional African American gunmaker. He was the eldest son, born in the Raleigh area of the Carolinas. It has been published that his father bought the family out of slavery, and according to that article, paid twice for their freedom due to a deceptive master. When the family relocated to Ohio, Mr. Jones’ father made sure that his four sons attended Oberlin College; the first college in the country to accept African American students. When J. M. Jones graduated from Oberlin in 1849 with a Bachelor of Science degree, he was the fourth African American to have achieved this high honor.

Mr. Jones later moved to Chatham, Ontario, Canada, a thriving community of well-known African American residents, and abolition sympathizers. It was the hometown of the former runaway slave, Josiah Henson, featured in the famous book by Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. It was also an important Underground Railroad terminal, and home to Harriet Tubman. And it was the town where the very famous abolitionist, John Brown, planned his raid on Harpers Ferry, recruiting local Chatham men to participate in that raid.

One of the few men that participated with John Brown in planning that famous raid was Mr. J. M. Jones, a skilled gunsmith, engraver and Justice of the Peace for his county, whose connection to John Brown is outlined in The Canadian Magazine of Politics, Science, Art and Literature, Vol. 4, November 1894 to April 1895. In this lengthy article, the details of J. M. Jones involvement with the Chatham Convention of May 8th, 1858 are examined. At this convention, Mr. Jones and John Brown among others took an oath of secrecy, adopted and signed a constitution, and put forth their ambitious goal to gain freedom for 4 million slaves. There are sections in this article that offer insight into J. M. Jones, the man; as he narrates a portion of the details contained within the article, and included within are several sketches he penned and a handsome photograph of him.

Another interesting story published about J. M. Jones is the article written by James Gooding, publisher of the Canadian Journal of Arms Collecting, titled “The prince & the pistols: James Gunsmith Jones’ gift was fit for royalty. His patrimony was not.” This article describes an event in September of 1860, when a member of the English royal family, the Prince of Wales, future King Edward VII, was invited to tour the town of Chatham and accept a finely crafted pair of derringer pistols made by a local gunsmith and businessman. But it was only decided at the last minute, after the Prince had already arrived and been kept waiting by the local officials, that it would be unseemly to present these exquisite pistols to a member of the Royal family, simply because they had been crafted by a man of color. Apparently, the account was published in the Chatham Tri-weekly Planet, a local newspaper at the time. It is not known, as of this writing, if the presentation of these pistols was ever actually made.

There also exists a letter dated March 15th, 1861, in the Library of Congress archives, from Mr. J. M. Jones to President Abraham Lincoln giving advice on the reconstruction of the South, and wishing for Mr. Lincoln in the final line of the letter, “…. a bloodless and prosperous administration.”; a rather ironic twist of fate, since President Lincoln was indeed killed with a similar type derringer, not too many years after this letter was delivered.

Mr. J. M. Jones’ work is stunning and extremely rare, seldom coming to auction, though Julia’s has had the pleasure of auctioning most every example known including this one, originally in 2010. Each individual piece is unique, but has recognizable embellishments that distinguish his craftsmanship from other gunsmiths’ work made during the same period. This particular derringer is considered a fantastic representation of his style and in beautiful “as found” condition. PROVENANCE: Copy of the reference The Canadian Magazine of Politics, Science, Art & Literature, 11/94-4/95(Vol 4)which documents Jones’ contribution to the abolition movement. CONDITION: Very fine plus. Bbl retains about all of its fine brown finish with visible Damascus pattern. Lockplate & hammer are dark case colors. Hammer screw is a replacement. Silver furniture is all cleaned bright. Stock has a hairline by the lockplate escutcheon, otherwise wood is sound showing light to moderate high point wear and retains most of its orig varnish. Mechanics are fine, strong dark bore. 52705-1 (7,500-10,000) – Lot 1345

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1346
$40,250.00

RARE NORTH & CHENEY FLINTLOCK PISTOL, SERIAL NUMBER 816.

SN 816. Cal. 72. 8-5/8″ rnd bbl marked “V/P” and “US” at breech. Bbl and tang each marked with full SN and assembly number “II”, also cut into back of bbl and breech. Assembly number “II” found on most external screws and inside bow of trigger guard. Further disassembly was not attempted to search for other markings as this gun is so well known with great collection history. Brass frame is marked underneath “NORTH & CHENEY BERLIN”. SN “816” marked inside frame. Like the frame, the butt cap is made of brass. Here is the opportunity to own the Rosetta Stone of United States martial pistols. Simeon North and Elisha Cheney signed a contract with the government to manufacture 500 pistols on March 8, 1799 and were the first pistols manufactured entirely by a contractor, as all previous procurements were assembled from parts either in storage or made by various people. These are truly the 1st American government contracted martial pistols. These new pistols were copied from the French Model 1777 Pistol with several improvements incorporated such as approximately 1/2″ longer bbl and an additional screw securing the frame to the bbl. The first 500 were marked “S.NORTH & E. CHENEY BERLIN” along the brass frame while the second contract were marked “NORTH & CHENEY BERLIN”. With these first 500 pistols delivered by early 1800, a second contract was forthcoming to Simeon North and Elisha Cheney for 1,500 pistols dated February 6, 1800. The final delivery of the 1,500 pistols were delivered by mid-year 1801 and effectively launched Simeon North into his pistol making venture that lasted another 25 years. PROVENANCE: Pistol was originally purchased by Henry M. Stewart, 1950; Clay Bedford Collection, 1967; James Lucie; Eric Vaule offered for sale in “Gun Report”, June 1976; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Iron bbl and tang are in good condition with pitting clearly showing “VP” and “US” markings. Frizzen and hammer are well fit and functional with matching patina to bbl, as does frizzen spring. Ramrod appears to be replaced. Brass frame and butt cap are in very good condition with all markings sharp and clear with old cleaning, shows numerous nicks, dings and scratches from normal handling. Orig stock is correct having old repaired crack and minor chipping at frame, hand worn patina. An interesting inked note in channel by early collector Henry Stewart “H.M.STEWART-PURCHASED AUGUST 1950”. Pistol is orig flint. Considering that only about two dozen of these rare and historic martial pistols are known to exist of the 2,000 orig delivered, this gun being a 2nd Model in original flint with great collection history would make this an important addition to any advanced martial pistol collection. 51957-4 JS (30,000-50,000) – Lot 1346

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