Spectacular Fall Firearms Auction
An Extraordinary Success Grossing $11.235 Million!

Auction: October 8-10, 2007

Preview: October 5-7, 2007

Please Note: All prices include the hammer price plus the buyer’s premium, which is paid by the buyer as part of the purchase price. The prices noted here after the auction are considered unofficial and do not become official until after the 46th day.

If you have questions please email firearms@jamesdjulia.com.


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Image Lot
Price
Description
1000

FIRST MODEL MORSE CARBINE. SN 44. Cal. 50. This gun appears orig in every regard and is the most popular of the Morse models, having a solid brass latch. Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes this gun as follows: “Production of inventor George W. Morse’s patent carbines at the State Military Works in Greenville, South Carolina, resulted in the delivery of about 1,000 such carbines. This example of what is considered to be the first model (prototype models excepted) is serial number 44. It is distinguished by the latching mechanism which depends on an iron rod in the operating lever to both lock the action and, when driven forward by the hammer, to cause a movable firing pin to strike the primer on the base of the metallic cartridge”. CONDITION: Bbl is gray/brown, cleaned showing scratching and pitting. Brass frame, nose cap, and buttplate show numerous scratches and dings. There are some porous areas due to casting. Buttstock shows traces of orig varnish. Forestock exhibits most of hits varnish. There is a 1″ x 1-1/2″ repair to forestock adjacent to nose cap. Buttstock has several chips at frame. There is a gap between part of frame and buttstock. Cryptic letter stamped on buttstock at trigger guard is present but not discernible. Buttplate is missing jag. 4-31338 JS114 (20,000-25,000)

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1001

SECOND MODEL MORSE CARBINE. SN 308. Cal. 50. This is the scarcest of the Morse carbines with only about 100-150 made. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “The Second Model (or Type II) Morse carbine, produced at the State Military Works in Greenville, South Carolina, is distinguished by a more sophisticated locking and firing mechanism. Included in this improved mechanism is the presence of a flanged iron rod connected to an iron plate with knurled edges which covers the forward top portion of the brass operating lever. The serial number range for this type of carbine is from 200 to the near 350 range. This carbine is serial numbered 308. Legibly scratched on the right side of the frame is ‘Captured at Columbia, South Car’… ex-Lee A. Petrov collection”. Rarely do we find Confederate carbines with capture information scratched so nicely, telling us a piece of their history. CONDITION: Brass surfaces are scratched and cleaned with numerous small dings and stains. Capture information scratched in frame is quite legible. Buttstock retains much of its orig varnish. Cryptic letter “C” in buttstock is well struck and discernible. Forestock is possible restoration, as is ramrod. Bbl lacks ramrod catch. Nose cap appears orig. Forestock exhibits raised grain and is very good. 4-31339 JS115 (20,000-25,000)

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1002

THIRD MODEL MORSE CARBINE. SN 743. Cal. 50. This is a good example of the standard production Morse carbine. Most production Morses were in this final model. Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes this gun as follows: “The Type III carbine, also manufactured at the State Military Works in Greenville, SC, retains the flanged rod device, but now the sliding breechblock is made of iron. Type III carbines are in the 350 serial number range until the end of production”. CONDITION: Brass frame, nose cap, and buttplate have pleasant patination over scattered nicks, gouges, and scratches, especially nicked around latch, where someone did not know to cock gun to open. Bbl is brown and smooth with scattered pitting, especially at muzzle. Forestock appears to be made of tiger maple and is possibly restored. 4-31340 JS116 (15,000-20,000)

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1003

CONFEDERATE TARPLEY CARBINE. SN 24. Cal. 52. This gun has an overall length of 39-1/2”. Bbl is 23” long and has 7 lands and grooves, which conforms to other known examples. Frame is brass, having a distinctive red tint, indicating the high copper content that is so characteristic to many Confederate manufactured arms. Frame tang is marked in 3 lines “J. H. TARPLEY’S / PAT. FEB. 14. / 1863”. Iron breechblock is hinged to the frame, being retained by a flat latch spring. Jeremiah Tarpley received a Confederate patent for his own design early in 1863. The state of North Carolina had an order for 200 guns between April and September of 1863. About half of Tarpleys produced and delivered to the state of North Carolina were rejected. The survival of these guns is rare—only 20 guns, of which less than half are in private hands. Eleven guns are in institutions, one being in the Army Museum in Madrid, Spain. Of the known 20 guns, 19 have an integral projecting step to help the latch spring hold breechblock in place; however, this gun, SN 24, being the lowest SN known, lacks this integral step. This is the only surviving specimen without this extra device to help maintain the breech closure. This gun is illustrated in Murphy & Madaus’ monumental work, Confederate Carbines and Musketoons. This carbine is among the finest Tarpley carbines known and appears orig and authentic in all regards. Since there are only two minor variations in Tarpleys, one lacking the projecting step for the spring latch, and the other with the projecting step, if you want a complete collection of Tarpleys of both types, this is your only chance to own both, as this is the only known low serial numbered Tarpley which has this feature. There is a battlefield excavated frame only of SN 16 with this same feature, but it is frame only. This is undoubtedly the finest Tarpley carbine to ever be offered at public auction, and since it’s one of the top few, it is probably the finest Tarpley that will ever be sold. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Jeremiah H. Tarpley, after a brief enlistment in the North Carolina “Guilford Grays,” received a patent for his breechloading system on February 14, 1863. He joined the firm of J & F Garrett Company, a Greensboro, North Carolina foundry. The State of North Carolina was the first major purchaser of a carbine using his system, and thereafter, Tarpley, Garrett & Co. offered these arms for public sale in newspaper advertisements and in broadsides. This example, serial number 24, is one of the lowest serial numbers known. In overall excellent condition, it represents one of the rarest of all Confederate carbines. Provenance: Illustrated and described and ”Confederate Carbines and Musketoons” by John Murphy and Howard Madaus, p. 216.” CONDITION: Iron surfaces are gray/brown with scattered pitting. Brass surfaces have good patina. Bore is very good. Stock is very good with scattered nicks and scratches. There are 2 repaired chips to stock where frame tang and frame come together. Latch and trigger guard are professionally restored. 4-313454-31469 JS243 (75,000-125,000)

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1004

KEEN WALKER CARBINE. SN NSN. Cal. 54. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states, “The Keen, Walker & Co. carbine, long known as the Confederate ‘Perry’ or ‘Tilting Breech’ carbine and the subject of much speculation as to where it was manufactured, has now been identified as the product of Keen, Walker & Co. in Danville, Virginia. The frame is of brass and unmarked except for Roman numerals on the internal parts. The 22-1/2″ bbl is rifled in caliber .54 and also unmarked except for an inspection of proofmark ‘P’ on the upper side of the barrel near the breech. This specimen has the initials ‘AH’ carved on the top of the comb near the stock”. This is a fine example that appears in near “attic”, untouched condition. It would be difficult to find a more pleasing specimen of this scarce Confederate carbine. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “The Keen Walker & Co. carbine, long known as the Confederate “Perry” or “Tilting Breech” carbine and the subject of much speculation as to where it was manufactured, has now been identified as the product of Keen, Walker & Co. in Danville, Virginia. The frame is of brass and unmarked, except for Roman numerals on the internal parts. The 22½” barrel is rifled in caliber .54 and also unmarked except for an inspection or proof mark “P” on the upper side of the barrel near the breech. This specimen has the initials “AH” carved on top of the comb of the stock.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Copper/brass frame has nice patina, as does the brass sideplate. Note the dissimilar patinas due to the dissimilar alloys. This is a distinctive characteristic of this particular maker. Bbl is smooth and brown with areas of scattered pitting. “P” proof on bbl is crisp and sharp. Rifling and bore is very good. Stock retains over half of its orig varnish. Traces of orig blue are found on trigger guard. Nipple is probably replaced. 4-31344 JS117 (20,000-25,000)

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1005

COLUMBUS ARMORY CARBINE. SN 18. Cal. 58. This Capt. F. C. Humphries inspected carbine was probably a product of the Columbus Armory, though the lock is unmarked. Several Confederate carbines made by various makers in Columbus, Georgia and the surrounding area have similar features. Among these makers are J. P. Murray, Columbus Armory, Dickson & Nelson, and David & Bozeman. All these manufacturers shared similarly designed carbines and Mississippi-style rifles. All these makers normally marked their guns, with exception of the Columbus Armory, where only 2 or 3 marked specimens are known. Based on this information, we believe this unmarked gun to be a product of the Columbus Armory. Earlier literature usually identifies these guns as J. P. Murray. Bbl of this gun is inspected “PRO./F.C.H.” which is seen on known J. P. Murray and Columbus Armory weapons. Information on the Columbus Armory only recently has come to light in the marvelous book by John Murphy and Howard Madaus, Confederate Carbines and Musketoons. Murphy and Madaus, in their book, describe a letter from John D. Gray, of the Columbus Armory, describing his contract for 1,000 carbines. This carbine is like a J. P. Murray Type II carbine where the two known marked Columbus Armory are like the J. P. Murray Type I carbines. The difference between the Type I and Type II carbines is the double strap front band as opposed to 2 bands and a nosecap like the gun being offered here. Lock screws and tang screw are also serial numbered “18”. This gun is serial numbered “18” on hammer and inner surface of lockplate, consistent with the three known Columbus Armory marked locks. Bbl is marked “PRO./F.C.H.” consistent with the other Columbus Armory products. There is no number on bottom of bbl; however, there is a group of 3 dots. This bbl is also marked “ALA / 1864” which is not seen on either of the known Columbus Armory guns. Gun is complete and authentic, lacking only its rear sight. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “The rifles and carbines produced by the partnership of Eldridge S. Greenwood and William C. Grey at Columbus, Georgia, share the same basic configuration, differing only in the barrel length. Manufactured under the apparently watchful eye of John P. Murray, superintendent and master armorer of the Greenwood and Grey facility, these weapons show a consistently high grade of workmanship. The barrel of the carbine is 23½ inches, marked “PRO” and “FCH” and held by two bands of the same type as the rifle. The stock ends in a brass nosecap. The lockplate of this carbine is unmarked, which is not unusual.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are all brown with scattered pittings. Bbl markings are deep and discernible. Inspector’s mark “FCH” is only visible when bbl is removed. Brass bands, nosecap, trigger guard, and buttplate are all cleaned and smooth. Stock is sound and solid with a visible repair around breech tang and behind lockplate. 4-31335 JS136 (10,000-15,000)

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1006

BILHARZ, HALL & CO MUZZLELOADING CARBINE. SN Not found. Cal. 58. This gun is a copy of the US Model 1855 rifle/carbine. These carbines typically come with pewter nosecaps, and earlier SN guns with brass nosecaps, such as this one. There is no SN on this gun on back of bbl breech where SN is typically found; however, the typical cryptic assembly markings are found internally on lock and bottom of bbl “C81”. Large Roman numeral “VXX” is cut on bottom of bbl and in stock channel. Other small assembly numbers occur on various lock parts and hammer. This is a nice example of the less frequently encountered, brass nosecapped carbine, made at Pittsylvania Courthouse, Va. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Bilharz, Hall carbines with the brass nosecaps are believed to be the production of muzzle loading carbines made following production of the breechloading “rising breech” carbines. Long mistakenly referred to as D. C. Hodgkins carbines, these carbines resemble the U. S. Model 1855 Springfield rifled carbine. The barrel is marked with a “P” and “CSA”. The serial number is on the left rear surface of the breech.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Bbl is gray/brown with areas of scattered pitting. “CSA” surcharge is stamped on left flat of bbl breech and is only fully discernible when bbl is removed. Rifling in bore is very good, though pitted. Lock, buttplate, and trigger guard have smooth, brown surfaces with scattered pitting. Stock is sound with hairline crack, approx. 1″ long, opposite lock and an old repair is visible to wood behind lock adjacent to breech tang. 4-31336 JS135 (15,000-20,000)

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1007

BILHARZ, HALL & CO MUZZLELOADING CARBINE. SN 451. This carbine is listed in Murphy & Madaus’ book Confederate Carbines and Musketoons. Surviving examples of this carbine are generally well-used and worn. This is an especially nice example and appears all orig and complete. Patterned after Model 1855 US muzzleloading carbine. One of the few differences between the US and this model is that this gun used a fixed rear sight as opposed to an adjustable one. This gun exhibits typical assembly letters and numbers, the bbl having “A3” stamped on bottom. SN “451” is found on bbl breach. Lock, internally is also marked “A3” and “12 / 2”. Hammer and other internal lock parts have same numbers stamped on them. Mr. Michel, in his notes, provides the following information: “Following production of the breechloading ‘rising breech’ carbines, Bilharz, Hall & Co. of Pittsylvania Court House, Virginia, turned to developing a muzzleloading carbine. As ultimately produced, the carbine resembles the US Model 1855 Springfield rifled carbine with a 22″, .58 caliber barrel. The ramrod is held by a swivel as with the Model 1855. The lockplate is unmarked. The barrel is marked with ‘CSA’ atop the breech and a ‘P’ opposite the bolster. The serial number appears on the left rear surface of the breech of the barrel. These carbines with the pewter nosecaps are thought to be later production than those having brass nosecaps”. CONDITION: Bbl is gray with discernible “CSA / P” proof. Scattered nicks, dings and pitting. Rifling in bore is faint, but discernible and pitted. Other metal surfaces are gray and cleaned. Stock overall is very good with good edges and has scattered dings, gouges, cracks, and scratches but still retains some orig varnish. Pewter nosecap is uncleaned, showing good patina. 4-31337 JS131 (20,000-25,000)

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1008

EXCEEDINGLY RARE AND DESIRABLE CONFEDERATE RISING BREECH CARBINE (BILHARZ, HALL & COMPANY). SN 20. One of the great rarities in Confederate arms collecting and one of the most sought after long arms in the arms collecting field is this Rising Breech Carbine. Its origins have long been the subject of much controversy in the confederate arms collecting field being attributed to a number of Southern armories and manufacturers. Recent research and much study by well known arms scholar Howard Michael Madaus and reported in published works, has shown that this carbine, once attributed to D.C. Hodgkins, is actually the product of the Bilharz, Hall & Company of Pittsylvania Court House, Virginia. This firm also produced a muzzle loading percussion carbine. The identity of die stampings, rifling, and other manufacturing details associated with the muzzle loading carbine and the Rising Breech Carbine have led scholars to this attribution with little dispute. Courthouse records, summarized below, also confirm the attribution of this rare carbine to this Virginia firm. This carbine is in .54 caliber Serial Number 20, and fired a paper cartridge. The breechblock rises vertically when the trigger guard/lever is lowered. Iron mounted on a two-piece walnut stock, the round barrel measures 21” long and is secured by a single flat barrel band. There is a sling ring mounted on the left side of the stock. The serial number appears on the frame, breechblock, inside the lever and on the underside of the butt plate. “CS” is stamped on the breech of the barrel and on the breechblock and the proof mark “P” is found beneath the barrel as well. The front sight is a pinched blade style with a three leaf graduated rear sight. The Bilharz, Hall & Company gun factory was built in what was a tin shop/foundry on Main Street in the Town of Chatham, Pittsylvania County, Virginia. According to the deed, its location was in back of the Masonic Lodge Hall some 1400 feet north of the Courthouse on land the partnership purchased of George A. Carter. Candidus Bilharz was the principal in the firm. Bilharz was an immigrant from Baden, Germany who was naturalized in Pittsylvania County in 1859. He was a harness maker, vintner/distiller, miller and mechanic who lived near Tanyard Branch in Chatham. Bilharz was connected to the prominent Bolanz family which emigrated from Baden, Germany also. Bilharz’s partner George Hall was a prominent businessman who owned a small tin shop along with extensive land holdings in the county. Records show him acting in various official capacities on behalf of the county during the Civil War. Col. Coleman D. Bennet was a silent partner in the firm and was presumably its chief benefactor. Bennett was a man of enormous wealth who owned vast tracts of county land plus a whole block of buildings on Main Street in downtown Chatham. Records show that thirty-eight people were employed by the gun works, and those fit for military service were given Confederate draft deferments due to their profession. Some of the names of the employees were as follows: G.C. Haden, A.C. Haden, R.L. Haden, John H. Shelton, Nathaniel Shelton, C.L. Mott, James Motley, B. Riddle, J.D. Reynolds, B. Reynolds, J.T. Abbott, C.P. Oakes, John H. Brown, M.B. Dickson, William Brown, Frank Compton, R.W. Hall, J. Beaver, J.H.C. Hutcherson, and Benjamin Dyer. Ages of the workers ranged from 18 to 40. Job titles included the following: Stocker, Rifling Hand, Polisher, Vice Hand, Band Holder, Helper and Mechanic. The 400 or so firearms produced from August of 1862 through March of 1864 (when operations ceased) were manufactured under contract with the Confederate Ordinance Department. Records also show that the firm purchased thousands of pounds of “skelp iron” from the Confederate government for use in rifle barrels. Interestingly, the company also manufactured 1745 wooden stocks at a dollar each for other rifle factories. These carbines did not receive favorable reports from Confederate ordnance inspectors; nonetheless, they most certainly saw service in the arms strapped South. ONLY 100 of these Rising Breech Carbines are thought to have been produced with only a handful known examples in the collecting world. Here we have a superb opportunity to obtain one of the rarest of confederate long arms in excellent condition. CONDITION: Excellent. All metal surfaces have been lightly cleaned but now retain a light to medium grey patina. The stocks show light use and wear but are in superb condition with the expected nicks and dings here and there. Light pitting exists around the nipple on the breechblock; otherwise the metal surfaces are smooth. Mechanically excellent. 4-31343 CW15 (40,000-60,000)

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1009

S. C. ROBINSON CONFEDERATE SHARPS. SN 2468. Cal. 52. This fabulous, historic carbine, identified by inscription on the stock to a member of “Stuart’s Cavalry”. Also written on the side of the stock “MOBILE, ALABAMA”. Stuart’s Cavalry was one of the hardest fighting calvary units in the Civil War and Lee had come to rely so much on Stuart’s elite and fleet ability that his absence during the onset of the Battle of Gettysburg was a tremendous loss to Lee and in his mind, in part, resulted in the defeat at this monumental battle for the South. This is a nice, orig and complete example of the earliest made Confederate Sharps carbines. SN appears externally on lock and frame. Lock is marked “SC Robinson / Arms Manufactory / Richmond Va / 1862” and bbl is marked behind rear sight “Richmond Va / 1862”. Initials “LSK” are nicely carved in buttstock. A search of Confederate records reveals an L.S.King who enlisted 7/31/1862 as a Private in Co G Va 4th Cavalry of Jeb Stuart’s division. Mr. Michel, in his notes, offers the following information: “Manufacture of the Sharps pattern carbine by the S. C. Robinson Arms Manufactory from Dec. 1862 to March 1, 1863, when the carbine factory was taken over by the Confederate government. during this short period, close to 2,000 carbines were produced. While these carbines generally follow the outline of the actual Sharps, the difference is immediately noticeable as the lockplate is not drilled for the Lawrence primer feeder and the hammer is more narrow and not imbedded into the outer projection of the receiver. The lockplate is marked ‘S.C. Robinson / Arms Manufactory / Richmond Va / 1862’. The top surface of the barrel is stamped ‘S. C. Robinson / Arms Manufactory’, and behind the rear sight is stamped ‘Richmond Va / 1862’. The serial number appears at the tail of the lockplate. This is the highest serial number known for a Robinson-marked carbine”. You are bidding on a popular Confederate carbine that generally saw a lot of use, and though this gun was used in battle, it is generally well preserved and complete. CONDITION: Bbl is brown/gray with scattered pitting. Other metal surfaces are also brown/gray with scattered pitting. Rifling in bore is deep and distinct, though pitted. Brass band has been cleaned. Brass buttplate is smooth and exhibits nice patina. Buttstock exhibits some orig varnish with numerous small nicks, dings, and scratches. Forestock has 3″ hairline crack which does not affect aesthetics. 4-31342 JS132 (20,000-40,000)

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1010

CONFEDERATE SHARPS CARBINE. SN 2370. Cal. 52. This is an exceptionally nice Confederate Sharps with sharp edges and crisp markings. SN is found on frame, bbl, and lockplate. When forestock is removed to view SN, orig bright brown finish is visible in this protected area. Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes this gun as follows: “Sharps pattern carbines made after the takeover of S. C. Robinson’s carbine factory no longer carry the same markings found on the earlier production. The lockplates are stamped only with the serial number at the tail of the lockplate. The top of the barrel is stamped only ‘Richmond Va’ behind the rear sight”. You are bidding on one of the finest Confederate Sharps carbines to market in many years. It would be difficult to upgrade this particular example. CONDITION: Metal is cleaned with sharp edges. Bbl has several areas of pitting. Breech and frame are smooth. SNs are well stamped. Richmond markings are clear and well stamped. Rifling in bore is very good. Wood is very good, still exhibiting raised grain. Several small dents are present on both forestock and buttstock. There is a 2-3″ hairline crack near bottom of buttplate which does not affect aesthetics. 4-31341 JS118 (15,000-20,000)

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1011

SCARCE AND EARLY PRODUCTION CONFEDERATE COOK & BROTHER ATHENS GEORGIA PRODUCTION CAVALRY CARBINE INSCRIBED TO A VIRGINIA CAVLARYMAN. SN 2865. One of the great rarities in Confederate long arm collecting is this early production Cook & Brother cavalry carbine serial number 2865. Its stock inscription that reads “S.W. Ellyson/Co. F/3rd Va. Cav.” enhances this rare carbine with rich history. This example has all of the early features including the iron swivel ramrod and sling ring bar on the left side of the stock. This carbine is in .58 caliber with a 21 1/8” barrel, two barrel bands and brass furniture on a black walnut stock. The front sling swivel is of brass, the rear of iron with a sling ring bar mounted to the left side of the stock having a large brass ring. Pinched front sight and fixed rear sight. All markings are correct. The left barrel flat near the breech is marked “Proved”, “Cook & Brother/Athens 1863/ 2865” is stamped on the right side of the barrel between the rear sight and the breech. The lock plate is stamped “Cook & Brother/Athens GA. 2865” over the date “1863.” To the rear of the hammer is a depiction of the Confederate First National Flag. One the cheek side of the stock, this carbine is inscribed and identified to a trooper in the 3rd Virginia Cavalry. The National Archives in its “Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations From the State of Virginia” shows a Samuel W. Ellyson as a member of Captain Vaiden’s Company F, 3rd Regiment Virginia Cavalry in 1863. The 3rd Virginia Cavalry served in Stuarts’ Cavalry Division, Fitzhugh Lee’s Brigade during the Battles of Antietam and Gettysburg. This rare and desirable identified Confederate cavalry carbine represents a unique opportunity to acquire a real piece of American history associated with one the Confederacy’s most renowned and hard fought cavalry units. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “The rarest of all Cook & Bro. productions of longarms is the carbine. The 21-1/8” barrel is well marked “Cook & Brother / Athens Ga 1863 / 2865”. The lockplate is marked, forward of the hammer “Cook & Bro”, “Athens”, and the date. All parts are serial numbered 2865. The stock is carved “S. W. Ellyson Co F 3rd Va Cav”. Ellyson mustered on August 29, 1862, as a Private in Capt. Vaiden’s Company of Cavalry, Company F, 3rd Regiment, Virginia Cavalry. Provenance: Charles M. Glenn, Jr. (who acquired it as a young boy in 1928 from a childhood friend in trade for an ice cream cone).” PROVENANCE: Ex. Coll Charles M Glenn, Jr. (who acquired it as a young boy in 1928 from a childhood friend in trade for an ice cream cone. CONDITION: Very good. All metal surfaces have aged to a nice grey patina; the walnut stock is in excellent shape with only a few areas with heavy wear. The inscription is clear and is of the period. The carbine functions mechanically well. 4-31292 CW14 (20,000-25,000)

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1012

COOK & BROTHER MUSKETOON. SN 2419. This 24″ bbl musketoon is often known as an artillery carbine. Lock is marked “Cook & Brother / Athens Ga / 1863” and SN “2419”. There is a Confederate First National Flag stamped rear of hammer on lockplate. Bbl is marked “Cook & Brother / Athens Ga / 1863” and SN “2511”, as is rear band and nose cap. Front band is SN “2509”. Since the SNs are mixed but all within 100 numbers or so, the gun was probably used in this configuration. Buttplate is stamped “CS”. “CS” surcharges on these guns are not normally encountered; however, this marking appears quite old and though it could have been done at any time, or even by a GAR post showing that their captured gun was Confederate, this mark adds to the aesthetics of the gun. Rear sling swivel is missing and has a screw placed contemporarily in its hole. Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes this gun as follows: “This musketoon, of the slimmer form in stock pattern probably represents a transition from New Orleans production to that of Athens, Ga. Although the lockplate is well marked as Athens production and dated 1863, it is serially numbered at 2419, about 100 numbers from the serial number which appears on the barrel, 2511. The brass front sight on the barrel is more characteristic of New Orleans production than Athens, as is the trigger guard, where the sling swivel is attached to a screw base rather than a lug on the trigger guard plate”. CONDITION: Bbl and lock are gray/brown with scattered staining, nicks, dings, and pitting, especially at breech. Brass rear sight, bands, nose cap, buttplate, and trigger guard are cleaned. Stock has several breaks and repairs, including piece of wood missing at toe. Repair at wrist, several repairs around lock. Ramrod is replaced and is pitted around tip. Both front and rear sights appear orig. Rifling in bore is sharp but pitted. Tang screw appears replaced. 4-31291 JS128 (12,000-18,000)

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1013

COOK & BROTHER MUSKETOON. SN 4920. Cal. 58. Cook & Brother 24″ bbl musketoon or artillery carbine, as the British gun was called, after which this gun was patterned. SN appears on lock, bbl, and nosecap. Lock is marked forward of hammer “Cook & Brother / Athens Ga / 1864 / 4920”. Bbl is similarly marked. Lock screws are also serial numbered “4920”. Tang screw is serial numbered “5428”, but appears orig to this gun. Opposite lock in stock is inspector’s cartouche “WH”. Wescom Hudgins was government inspector working in Athens in 1864. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states: “Cook & Brother produced musketoons with significantly different stock types. This is an example of the heavier, more bulky type, with the other being slimmer in form. Both types are 2-band brass mounted with 24″ bbls. Lockplate on this example is well marked, forward of the hammer, ‘Cook & Brother / Athens Ga / 1864’, as is the tang. At the tail is a depiction of the Confederate National Flag. All parts, nosecap, barrel bands, barrel, lockplate, trigger guard, and buttplate are serial numbered, in this case, ‘4920’…Ex. coll. George Knight”. CONDITION: Bbl is cleaned with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Rifling in bore is discernible though pitted. Bbl breech is well defined. Bbl markings are distinct. Lock is cleaned and pitted. All markings are discernible. Hammer is an Enfield replacement. Bbl bands are possible replacements. Ramrod is cleaned and pitted, matches condition of bbl, but is of Austrian manufacture. 4-31290 JS134 (15,000-20,000)

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1014

FAYETTEVILLE RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 58. This is the standard, late production Fayetteville rifle with 33″ bbl. This is a nice example, orig and complete. Lock is dated “1864”, as is bbl. Opposite lock is inspector’s cartouche which is still quite visible. Also, on back of stock is scratched “Captured April 1865”. In same style of markings as the capture information the gun is marked “TR 1866″ opposite lock. This gun has seen some use, but rifling is still decent. Gun is accompanied by a heavy, Confederate, canvas sling and an angular bayonet that fits gun well. This gun exhibits all proper proofs and markings normally associated with this maker. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: Manufactured on the rifle equipment removed from Harpers Ferry to Richmond and ultimately to Fayetteville, NC, this rifle is characteristic of production there. The hammer is of the distinctive ‘S’ curve configuration. The lockplate is marked, forward of the hammer, with an eagle over ‘CSA’ (the ‘S’ being upside down when the die was created) and ‘Fayetteville’ and with the date ‘1864’ at the tail. The date ‘1864’ also appears on the barrel at the breech. The left side of the buttstock is carved ‘Captured April 1865’. The rifle is complete with its correct socket bayonet and linen sling.” You are bidding on a very good, all orig and complete, 1864-dated Fayetteville rifle with orig sling and bayonet. CONDITION: Bbl, lock, and ramrod are cleaned and gray/bright with scattered areas of pitting. Brass buttplate, trigger guard, bands and nose cap are cleaned and smooth with scattered nicks and scratches. All markings in metal are crisp and bright and easily read. Stock exhibits scattered scratches, nicks, and scrapes. Cartouche is well defined, though worn. Hairline crack about 1″ long is found just behind lock. There is about a 2″ x 1/4″ wood sliver repaired behind hammer. Bayonet is gray with scattered staining and pitting. Sling is very good and solid. Leather strip is very good with no discernible cracking. Leather loop is scuffed in high areas. Sling overall is in superior condition from those normally encountered. 4-31306 JS124 (10,000-15,000)

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1015

RARE, EARLY AND FINE NEW ORLEANS PRODUCED CONFEDERATE COOK & BROTHER RIFLE. This example is, clearly, one of the earliest products of this notable Confederate arms manufacturer and one of the best surviving examples. Manufactured by this well known Confederate long gun manufacturer is this 1861 dated and New Orleans marked Cook & Brother rifle. Generally following the English Enfield style, this rifle is a .58 caliber percussion muzzleloader 2-band rifle with a 33” barrel having the distinctive “twist” in metal’s surface and having an attached lug for a sword bayonet. The barrel retains its original front sight and its long range rear sight. Lock, barrel and ramrod are of iron; all other furniture is of brass, including the sling swivels located at the top band and at the rear of the trigger guard. The barrel is marked “Proved” at the left breech and stamped “N.O. 1861” on the top of the barrel between with rear sight and the breech. The lock plate is marked “Cook & Brother, N.O. 1861” and has the distinctive Confederate 1st National flag stamped immediately before the hammer on the lock plate face. The stock is of walnut and the ramrod of the Enfield pattern with knurled and slotted head. The Cook and Brother firm was established in New Orleans at the outbreak of the Civil War. Threatened by the fall of that City early in the War, their manufacturing operation was moved to Athens, Georgia in 1862. Ferdinand W.C. and Francis L. Cook, recent English immigrants, were the principals in the firm. The former was a skilled engineer for the manufacture of Enfield rifles, bayonets and cavalry horse shoes. Said to be the largest and most efficient private armory in the Confederacy. It produced rifles, carbines and musketoons declared by an ordnance officer to be “superior to any that I have seen of Southern manufacture.” Under contract to supply 30,000 rifles to the Confederate Army the armory operated until its employees, organized as a reserve battalion under Major Ferdinand and Captain Francis Cook, were in 1864 called to active duty upon the approach of Sherman’s Army. The battalion took part in the battles of Griswoldville, Grahamville, Honey Hill and Savannah where Major. Cook was killed. After the Battle of Griswoldville Gen. P.J. Phillips reported that Maj. Cook and his men “participated fully in the action, deported themselves gallantly and . . . suffered much from wounds and death.” Leased by the Confederacy in 1865 the armory was operated until the close of the War. The old manufacturing property in Georgia was bought by the Athens Manufacturing Co. in 1870. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “While all Confederate longarms, as well as the handguns, are relatively rare and the arms produced by Cook & Bro. no less so, there are only a very few surviving examples of the company’s initial production in New Orleans before being relocated to Athens, Georgia. This is a particularly fine example of that early production and is original throughout. The lockplate is well marked “Cook & Brother NO 1861” forward of the hammer with the Confederate national appearing at the tail. All parts bear the same serial number 41, on the nosecap, bands, barrel, lockplate, trigger guard, and buttplate.” CONDITION: Fine. These firearms were finished in the “white” and this example has aged to a pleasant grey color with its brass furniture having a medium yellow patina. This rifle has been lightly cleaned but it does not detract from its appearance. There is some medium to deep pitting on the barrel near the breech. The barrel “twist” is very visible, all markings are clear and most edges sharp. The stock is quite nice with only a small chip missing at the barrel tang. Ramrod appears to be original to the rifle. 4-31288 CW10 (20,000-25,000)

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1016

COOK & BROTHER ATHENS, GEORGIA RIFLE. SN 6188. This is your standard, 33″ Athens-made, Cook & Brother rifle. Lock on this gun is marked “Cook & Brother / Athens, GA / 1864 / 6188”. These markings all occur forward of hammer. Confederate 1st National Flag is stamped rear of hammer. Bbl is marked on top “Cook & Brother / Athens GA / 1864” and also SN “6188”. Rear band and nose cap are also serial numbered “6188”. Lock screws and tang screw are also serial numbered “6188”. Screws are buffed, however their serial numbers are difficult to read. Several two-digit secondary or assembly numbers are found on other parts. According to Mr. Michel’s notes, “With the fall of New Orleans, Cook & Brother moved production to Athens, GA, where this two-band rifle was produced. In extraordinary condition and all original throughout, the lockplate is well marked, forward of the hammer, ‘Cook & Brother’ and ‘Athens Ga 1864’ and at tail a depiction of the Confederate National Flag. All components, nose cap guards, barrel, lockplate, triggerguard, and buttplate are all marked with serial number 6188, indicating it was made close to the end of company production. Provenance: Yale University, Jack Malloy” This is a really fine Cook rifle in condition not often found on these guns. The gun was cleaned in the style in which institutions used to clean guns in the early 20th century. CONDITION: Metal surfaces on this gun have been cleaned bright, making some markings and SNs difficult to fully read. Bbl clearly shows the twist where bbl was made from twisted iron. Brass bands, trigger guard, nose cap, and buttplate are cleaned and polished. Stock is lightly sanded and varnished, but still retains fairly sharp edges. A 4″ x 1/2″ large sliver of wood has been replaced, adjacent to ramrod channel between bands. There is also a repaired chip approx. 1″ at toe of buttstock 4-31289 JS127 (20,000-25,000)

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1017

DAVIS & BOZEMAN RIFLE. SN 280. Davis & Bozeman firearms are quite scarce and are rarely encountered. The lock on this gun, though lightly marked reads “B&D/ALA” forward of hammer. Rear of hammer on lock, gun is dated 1864. Bbl is proofed “ALA/1864” though the “4” is only partially struck. Bbl, breech, and stock are all internally marked “XXXIX”. Bbl is also stamped on bottom “73”. SN “280” occurs on back of hammer and inside lock. Stock exhibits some fancy floral carving with large initials “JB”, probably denoting the gun’s owner. Mr. Michel notes that this gun is 1 of fewer than 10 of these rifles known to survive today, and this is one of very few outside a museum collection. This is indeed a very rare Confederate rifle, and this may be your only chance to buy one, especially as nice and presentable as this one. CONDITION: Bbl is gray/bright with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Both front and rear sights are complete. Bore is well worn; however, rifling is still present. Stock has repair just above lock. Brass buttplate, trigger guard, and nose cap are cleaned and smooth with scattered scratches and dents. Lockplate markings are discernible but typically light struck. SN “280” is well struck inside lock and inside hammer. Front band appears to be restored. 4-31298 JS122 (20,000-30,000)

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1018

COLUMBUS ARMORY RIFLE. SN 73. Cal. 58. Several Confederate rifles made by various makers in Columbus, GA and the surrounding area have similar features. Among these makers are J. P. Murray, Columbus Armory, Dickson, Nelson, and David & Bozeman. All these manufacturers shared similarly designed carbines and MS-style rifles. All these makers normally marked their guns, with exception of the Columbus Armory, where only 2 or 3 marked specimens are known. Based on this information, we believe this unmarked gun to be a product of the Columbus Armory. Earlier literature usually identifies these guns as J. P. Murray. Bbl of this gun is inspected “PRO. / F.C.H.” which is seen on known J. P. Murray and Columbus Armory weapons. Information on the Columbus Armory only recently has come to light in the marvelous book by John Murphy and Howard Madaus, Confederate Carbines and Musketoons. Murphy and Madaus, in their book, describe the Confederate contract to Columbus Armory for 200 guns in 1862, to be inspected by Capt. F. C. Humphries, who inspected this gun. John D. Gray, the owner of the Columbus Armory, was paid for 183 guns. This gun, SN 73, certainly falls in that range. Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes the markings and restoration of this gun as follows: “The lockplate is unmarked, but the barrel in characteristically marked ‘PRO. / F.C.H’. The sideplate is marked ‘VI’ and the barrel underside marked ’73’, while the inside of the lockplate is marked both ‘VI’ and ’73’. The fore-end has been added from underneath the rear band to the front band and nose cap. On the barrel is an original and correct Boyle & Gamble brass saber bayonet adapter”. CONDITION: Bbl is brown/black with scattered pitting. Bbl proofs are clear and well stamped. There is a partially discernible “224” stamped about 3″ from muzzle end on top of bbl. The attached Boyle & Gamble bayonet adapter is serial numbered “46” and has a rich, “excavated”-type patina. Brass buttplate and trigger guard are well patinaed over scattered nicks and scratches. Front bbl band and possibly rear bbl band, are replacements, as is forestock forward of rear band, ramrod, and rear sight. 4-31299 JS121 (8,000-12,000)

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1019

DICKSON, NELSON & CO RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 54. This Confederate copy of a Mississippi rifle was made in Dawson, GA, in 1865. Lock is marked forward of hammer “Dickson / Nelson & Co / CS”. Rear of hammer is marked “ALA / 1865”. Bbl is not dated but is stamped internally with a small “G” and a large “R” near breech plug. Murphy and Madaus in their book Confederate Rifles and Muskets stated, “There are no external stampings on the barrels. The internal surface of the lockplate is unmarked. The under surface of the barrel of many specimens studied is stamped with a small ‘G’. The significance of this marking is not known at this time, but it probably is the initial of one of the workmen who inspected finished arms at the plant”. Like other guns of this manufacture, gun exhibits brass buttplate, trigger guard, nosecap, and clamping bands. Gun appears orig and complete in every regard, with possible exception of replaced front sling swivel. Ramrod appears orig to this gun, though of foreign manufacture. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states that this gun was cataloged by Robert Abels in his catalog #34. This gun was item #6. CONDITION: Bbl is gray, cleaned and pitted, especially at breech. Lock is gray and smooth. Markings are clear. Brass buttplate, trigger guard, bands, and nosecap are smooth with nice patina. Stock is sound with scattered dings, gouges, scratches. Repaired hairline crack in front of lock and about a 1″ piece of wood replaced behind bolster. 4-31300 JS133 (18,000-25,000)

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1020

READ & WATSON TYPE 1 RIFLE. SN 186. Cal. 64. This scarce gun is being offered in near “attic” condition. Accompanied by orig Hall bayonet which fits gun snugly. Surfaces are mostly untouched, with exception of apparent contemporary repair to wrist. SN is stamped below nipple, on breech. Also serial number on bottom of buttstock “C186”. Mr. Michel, in his notes, tells the history of this specimen as follows: “Long assumed to have been made from parts captured at Harpers Ferry that were thereafter assembled by J. B. Barret in Wytheville, Virginia, it is now clear that these rifles were actually assembled by N. T. Read and John J. Watson of Danville from carbines and rifles the state had received prior to the outbreak of the war under the Militia Act. In the process of altering the rifles, the original Hall breech block and frame were replaced by a brass breech piece with a centrally positioned iron breech plug for the barrel into which a nipple was screwed. The new breech piece is a small, narrow insert, only the rear tang of which extends part way back along the top of the wrist of the stock. Original Hall parts are used as the barrels, barrel bands, buttplates, triggers, and trigger guards. The buttstock is of new manufacture. The forestock is original, joined with a staple. Serial numbers appear on the underside of the buttstock and on the breech below the nipple”. CONDITION: Bbl and other iron parts are gray/brown with scattered staining and pitting. Old varnish on bbl is discolored. Stock exhibits numerous scratches, nicks, and dings, along with an old repair to wrist, visible on back side of gun. Brass breech is smooth with good patina over scattered nicks. 4-31305 JS119 (12,000-15,000)

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1021

READ & WATSON TYPE II RIFLE. SN Not noted. Cal. 64. Mr. Michel describes this rifle as follows: “Now known to be the product of N. T. Read and John J. Watson of Danville, Virginia, using rifles and carbines which had been supplied under the Militia Act to the state of Virginia prior to the outbreak of the war, these rifles represent an unusual conversion from breechloader to muzzle loading arm, instead of the more usual reverse. The Type II variation of this rifle has a breech piece of brass cut significantly larger than that of the Type I. This breech piece is bulky, with a heavy rearward extending tang which covers the top of the wrist of the stock and the top front part of the comb of the stock. The serial number is a Roman numeral in the bottom of the brass breech piece and a letter in conjunction with an Arabic number on the curved forward face on the bottom of the breech piece”. Type II Read & Watsons are quite scarce with the large, brass breeches. You are bidding on a nice example of this rarely offered rifle with an accompanying, correct Hall bayonet. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Now known to be the product of N. . Read and John J. Watson of Danville, Virginia, using rifles and carbines which had been supplied under the Militia Act to the State of Virginia prior to the outbreak of he war, these rifles represent an unusual conversion from breechloader to muzzle loading arm, instead of the more usual reverse. The Type II version of this rifle has a breechpiece of brass but significantly larger than that of the Type I. This breechpiece is bulky with a heavy rearward-extending tang which covers the top of the wrist of the stock and the top front part of the comb of the stock. The serial number is a Roman numeral in the bottom of the brass breech piece and a letter in conjunction with an Arabic number, a Roman numeral, or other letter on the curved face of the bottom of the breechpiece.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Bbl and other iron parts are gray with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Old Harpers Ferry “NWP” inspector mark visible on breech. Stock is sound, with numerous dings, dents. Several chips to ramrod channel. Stock retains some varnish. Brass breech has nice patina over scratches and dings. 4-31304 JS120 (12,000-15,000)

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1022

UNKNOWN CONFEDERATE MISSISSIPPI RIFLE. SN NSN. This is a most unusual gun. At first sight, it appears to be a standard contract MS; however, the brass bands on this gun are pinned, it contains a much larger diameter ramrod, patchbox mortise is very odd and crudely cut, and lockplate is simply marked “Manton”, and hammer is unusual and appears cast. No other markings are seen. Small brass bayonet adapter is attached to bbl about 4″ from muzzle. This is a very unusual gun. We have not seen another assemblage like it. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate copy of M1841 rifle. Lockplate marked in small English letters “Manton”. Patchbox inlet with hand drill marks. Two brass bands are fastened with iron nail passing through the stock. Barrel is unmarked. Brass saber bayonet adapter with small lug.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Bbl is brown with scattered pitting. Bbl appears heated near muzzle. Front sight is replaced. Stock exhibits numerous nicks and scratches. One hairline crack opposite lock. Approx. 3″ piece of wood is restored above lock at breech. Brass bands, trigger guard, buttplate, and patchbox exhibit good patination over numerous scratches and scrapes. Lock and hammer are cleaned and pitted. Trigger and sling swivels are dark and pitted. 4-31307 JS123 (2,000-5,000)

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1023

RICHMOND ASSEMBLED RIFLED MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 58. Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes this gun as “Model 1861 Richmond rifled musket”. He describes the gun as follows: “This rifled musket represents the first type assembled with parts taken from Harpers Ferry after the capture of the arsenal and armory by Virginia state trooops at the outset of the war. Lockplate is of the high hump configuration of the Model 1855 lockplate but has never been milled for the Maynard primer mechanism and is totally unmarked. Bbl is similarly unmarked and has no cutout for a rear sight. Forestock has been restored, but bbl is orig full 40″ length.” CONDITION: Bbl and lock are brown with scattered pitting. Lock retains 1855 hammer. Iron buttplate is U.S. surcharged. Nosecap is brown and heavily pitted. Bands, ramrod, and trigger guard are brown and smooth with scattered pitting. Bbl exhibits no discernible rifling. Stock is cut under rear band and restored forward. Stock is lightly sanded and has about a 3″ repair behind lock, adjacent to bolster. 4-31240 JS170 (2,000-4,000)

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1024

1861 RICHMOND RIFLED MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 58. Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes this gun as follows: “This rifled musket represents the first type produced at Richmond before the takeover by the central government and subsequent marking with the ‘CS’ designation. Lockplate is marked forward of the hammer ‘Richmond Va’ and at tail ‘1861’. Gun retains both orig sights. Rifling is visible, though faint. No bbl date or proofs are visible due to rust and pitting. Stock has correct 1855-style mortise under lock, as to be expected on an 1861 Richmond assemblage. Ramrod has interesting repair, where orig tulip-shaped end has been repaired by blacksmith with 1/4” cylindrical tip. CONDITION: Bbl bands, iron buttplate, and nosecap are brown and pitted, as is trigger guard. Lockplate and hammer are gray with scattered areas of muted casecolor and pitting. Ramrod is gray/brown with scattered areas of pitting. Stock is solid and has typical red color often encountered in these guns. There are numerous dings, gouges, scrapes, and scratches, especially on wood opposite lock. 4-31242 JS152 (4,000-6,000)

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1025

MODEL 1861 RICHMOND RIFLED MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 58. This early 1861 Richmond still retains the Model 1855 hammer and a surcharged US Model 1855 buttplate. Mr. Michel describes this gun further as follows: “This rifled musket represents the first type assembled with parts taken from Harpers Ferry after the capture of the arsenal and armory by Virginia state troops at the outset of the war. The lockplate is marked ‘Richmond Va’ indicating it is one assembled after movement of the parts to that city but still using old parts, as bbl uses the Model 1855 long-range rear sight not produced at Richmond. Lockplate itself has been modified, again subsequent to orig assembly by being ground at the hump top to level the plate to the contour of the stock, much like the plates subsequently produced at Richmond”. CONDITION: Bbl is brown and apparently refinished. No rifling is visible in bore. Stock is restored from rear band forward as are ramrod, nosecap, and bands. Buttstock has old repair at wrist. Blacksmith-made ramrod appears orig to era. Long-range rear sight is replaced. Accompanying ramrod is pitted on socket and blade is gray with scattered staining and pitting. 4-31241 JS153 (3,000-5,000)

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1026

1862 RICHMOND RIFLED MUSKET SN NSN. Cal. 58. Lock is marked and dated “CS / Richmond Va / 1862”, and lock now has a Richmond manufactured hammer. Bbl is dated “1861” with proper “VP / eagle head” proofs. Buttplate is brass. Nosecap is iron. Mr. Michel, according to his notes, states the following: “This rifled musket represents the first marked after the takeover by the central government of the Confederacy as indicated by the lockplate marking of ‘CS’ over ‘Richmond Va’ forward of the hammer. The date ‘1862’ appears at the tail of the lockplate which still is of the high hump form.” CONDITION: Bbl is cleaned and gray with scattered areas of pitting and staining. Lock is gray/brown with numerous nicks and scratches. Markings are good. Stock is restored from middle band forward, as is front band and nosecap. Stock has repair at left of bolster tang. Ramrod is correct style, Model 1855 with swell. Attached Confederate sling is good, missing leather reinforcement strip, with some fraying at edges. Accompanying bayonet is cleaned with scattered staining and pitting. 4-31243 JS154 (6,000-9,000)

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1027

1862 RICHMOND RIFLED MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 58. At some point in 1862, Richmond ran out of or quit using Harpers Ferry parts, and guns could be all Richmond manufactured, including brass buttplate and nosecap, bands with centrally-stamped “U’s”. Bbls and trigger guards typically show stress lines in the metal. Lockplates now have a low hump, which is characteristic of all further production of Richmond locks through the end of the war. This gun shows all these features, and is all Confederate Richmond-manufactured with exception of contemporarily replaced, blacksmith-made ramrod which fits gun well, and color matches well also. Accompanied by a matching .58 caliber unsurcharged 1855-style bayonet and orig Confederate linen sling. You are bidding on a very nice and presentable 1862-dated gun that is all orig, and better guns are difficult to find. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This rifled musket represents the final low hump configuration of the lockplate produced at Richmond. The lockplate is marked “CS / Richmond Va / 1862”. The buttplate is brass as is the nosecap. Provenance: Ex. coll. Carl Pugliese” CONDITION: Bbl is cleaned, gray/bright with areas of pitting, especially around breech. Front and rear sites appear orig. Bore is very worn; however, rifling is present. Other metal surfaces are cleaned and gray/bright. Brass nosecap and buttplate are smooth. Stock exhibits color often seen on Richmond wood. Initials “SHM” are scratched on right side of buttstock. Buttstock is sound; however, there are a few hairline cracks and one large gouge approx. 1″ x 1″ x 1/4″ deep on bottom. 4-31244 JS156 (9,000-15,000)

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1028

1863 RICHMOND RIFLED MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 58. This gun appears all orig and Richmond in manufacture. In 1863, most Richmonds encountered, if untouched, exhibit brass buttplate, brass nosecap, correct Richmond bands, Richmond bbl, lock, and hammer, and Richmond stock and ramrod, as does this example. This gun was once in the collection of Henry Stewart. You are bidding on a very nice, all orig, 1863-dated Richmond musket with an orig Confederate linen sling and accompanied by an unsurcharged, angular bayonet. This gun was probably made early in 1864, as bbl is dated “1864”. Armory was still probably utilizing the few remaining 1863 locks. Ben Michel’s Notes State: This rifled musket is again typical of those produced under the central Confederate government. The lockplate is marked, forward of the hammer, “CS / Richmond Va” and at the tail, the date of production, “1863”. Both the buttplate and the nosecap are made of brass. Provenance: Ex. coll. Henry M. Stewart.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Bbl is gray/bright, showing typical Richmond stress lines longitudinally on bbl. Rifling is discernible, though bore is dark. Lock is gray and matches bbl well, as do bands. Brass buttplate and nosecap are well patinaed. Stock is sound with numerous nicks and dings throughout. Sling is good overall. Accompanying bayonet is gray with scattered pitting. Orig Richmond ramrod is 38-1/4″ long, so it has lost about 1″ of its orig length. 4-31245 JS157 (9,000-15,000)

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1029

1864 RICHMOND RIFLED MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 58. This is what we consider to be the standard late production 1864 Richmond rifled musket. Markings here are the most typically noted on 1864s. Nice 1864s, where barrel are usually deeply stamped, as they are here. The “VP” proof was changed from earlier models, like is seen here where the “VP” is deep and there is no break in the “P”. On all other Richmonds prior to this standard or late-production 1864, a broken “P” is generally noted. This gun shows tremendous stress marks in the metal on bbl, trigger guard, hammer, and even in the rear sight. This gun appears orig and complete in every regard. This gun must have been captured or made late in the war and saw little use, because there is little pitting from powder at breech, and the bore rifling is very good. You are bidding on a beautiful 1864-dated Richmond rifled musket that is orig and complete in every regard, really showing the last-ditch manufacture of the Confederacy, with an orig Confederate sling and accompanying proper bayonet. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are cleaned and are gray/bright. Markings on bbl and lock are very good. Brass nosecap and buttplate are smooth and patinaed with scattered scratches. Stock is sound and solid with scattered dings and scratches. In front of comb of stock, there is a small, cross-hatched, carved area. 4-31246 JS158 (10,000-15,000)

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1030

RICHMOND MUSKETOON. SN NSN. Cal. 58. As Mr. Michel will later state, these 30″ bbl musketoons or short rifles are quite controversial as to their origin. This gun does indeed have correct Richmond lock and hammer, the “VP” proof has a broken “P” as is expected in Harpers Ferry and Richmond-produced guns. Trigger guard shows metal faults commonly seen in Richmonds. Mr. Michel states in his notes: “Although this weapon is the subject of some controversy as a result of its unusual configuration and the lack of a specific reference to it in the Richmond production records, examples, albeit rare, are to be found in old collections of Confederate weapons. Further, the catalog of September 1870 stores of condemned ordnance at the Springfield Armory does list some 318 Richmonds ‘altered to smooth bore’ as are these musketoons. The bbl is 30″ in length with 2 bands comprising the rear and middle bands of a 3-band rifled musket. Stock tip and buttplate are iron. Lock is a standard Richmond 1863 low humpback lock. Most unique about this arm is the slimming of the stock around the lockplate and the flat on the left side of the stock opposite the lockplate. With original 15″ bayonet, narrowed blade and unmarked. It is my opinion that these musketoons are the subject of the reference in the October 12, 1863 report by W. S. Downer, Superintendent of the CS Armory in Richmond to Josiah Gorgas, Chief of Ordnance, providing a production report for the Richmond Armory for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1863. In that report he lists 651 ‘new smooth bore carbines cal. 69’ distinct from 2791 ‘new rifle carbines caliber 58′”. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are gray with scattered pitting. Stock is sound with numerous dings and dents. Bbl shows no rifling, as a smooth bore should. Petite 15-1/2″ bladed bayonet fits gun snugly. Bayonet is cleaned and matches color of bbl. 4-31248 JS155 (3,000-6,000)

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1031

1863 RICHMOND CARBINE. SN NSN. Cal. 58. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “In 1863, Richmond began production of a ‘new rifled carbine.’ The bbl is 25″ in length with a special front sight having a wide base and pinch sight form. Forestock is held by 2 bands, same as the rear and middle band with sling swivel of a 3-band rifled musket. Nosecap and buttplate are of brass. Sling swivel on a screw base is located behind the trigger guard plate, although a sling swivel continues to also appear on the trigger guard bow. Lockplate is marked forward of the hammer ‘CS / Richmond Va’ and at the tail is dated ‘1863’. You are bidding on a fine, solid 1863-dated carbine which is complete and orig. These carbines are generally well used, and this is a beautiful example. CONDITION: Bbl is brown/black with pitting. Rifling is good, though pitted. Bbl retains orig front and rear sights, which are complete. Bands, trigger guard, and sling swivels are brown and pitted. Ramrod is brown and smooth and may be replaced, but it is an orig rod. Brass nosecap and buttplate exhibit good patina with scattered scratches. Stock is sound, exhibiting numerous scratches, scrapes, and nicks. 1” crack is found forward of lock. Wood is repaired around read sling swivel. 4-31249 JS159 (9,000-15,000)

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1032

1864 RICHMOND CARBINE. SN NSN. Cal. 58. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states, “The final production year of the ‘new rifled carbine’ first produced in 1863. The 25″ long bbl has a special front sight with a wide base and pinched sight form. The 2 bands are the same as the rear and middle bands as a 3-band rifled musket. There are 3 sling swivels, one on the front band, one on the trigger bow, and one on a screw based located behind the trigger guard plate. Nosecap and buttplate are of brass. Lockplate is marked forward of the hammer ‘CS / Richmond Va’ and at the tail is the date ‘1864’. Armory records include only 2 carbines produced in January 1865.” You are bidding on a last year of production, 1864-dated Richmond carbine with lock and bbl date. These guns saw generally very hard use, and pitting at bolster most often obliterated bbl dates. This gun exhibits a strong 1864 bbl date. Stock on this gun is superior, showing sharp edges and some orig varnish. CONDITION: Bbl is brown/black with pitting. Bbl retains orig front and rear sights, which are very good. Rifling is good. Lock is dark and pitted. Trigger guard and bands and ramrod are cleaned with scattered pitting. 2 small initials, possibly inspector, are stamped rear of trigger guard. These initials are possibly “JB” or “JH”. Stock is sound with good edges and some orig varnish over numerous small gouges, scrapes, and scratches. Initials “WSP” are scratched in left flat of buttstock. Brass nosecap and buttplate exhibit good patina. Ramrod has solid tulip end, not of Richmond manufacture, but fits gun well and presents nicely with it. 4-31250 JS160 (9,000-15,000)

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1032A

RICHMOND ASSEMBLED CARBINE. SN NSN. Cal. 58. A very rare form of Richmond Altered Carbine predating the 1863 Rifled carbine. Only a few these are known to still exist. Mr. Michel, in his notes calls this gun a “Richmond Model 1842 Altered Carbine” and describes it as follows: “In 1862, Richmond produced a limited number of carbines having the lock, stock, and bbl of the Model 1842 musket. Bbl has been shortened to 25″ with a front sight of the wide base and pinched sight of the Richmond rifled carbine and rifle. Stock is cut back to between front band and muzzle, and the wood simply rounded off. There is no nosecap. Like the Richmond rifled carbine, there are three sling swivels, one in the front band, one on the trigger guard bow, and one on a screw base located behind the trigger guard plate.” CONDITION: Metal surfaces with exception of rear sling swivel are brown, smooth with scattered pitting. Rear sling swivel is brown and pitted. Front sling swivel is restored. Ramrod has solid tulip end and color matches other metal on this gun. 4-31252(3,000-5,000)

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1033

RICHMOND ASSEMBLED CARBINE. SN NSN. Cal. 58. This gun was evidently captured by Jacob B. Stauffer of the PA 197th Infantry. His initials and name occur 3 times on this gun. Gun is made of both Richmond and Springfield parts. Similar guns with 1861 Springfield locks are pictured in Murphy & Madaus, along with other references. Gun is in very good, untouched condition, exhibiting good fit and very good condition overall. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states the following: “In addition to the repair and modification of rifled muskets to rifles, Richmond also modified, in the same fashion, a number of rifled muskets to the same configuration as Richmond-made rifled carbines. These rifled muskets had the bbls cut to 25″ and typical Richmond carbine and rifle sight installed. In all other respects as well, these carbines were made to conform to the Richmond carbine. Very few of these carbines are known to still exist, of which this is one of the finest examples.” CONDITION: Iron surfaces are gray/bright with good markings, brass nosecap is well patinaed. Ramrod appears orig but is cut back about 1″. Rifling is very good. 4-31258 JS168 (6,000-8,000)

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1034

RICHMOND RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 58. Mr. Michel describes this 1864 rifle as follows: “In 1864 Richmond began production of a very limited number of ‘short rifles.’ This example is typical with a 33″ bbl. Forestock is held by 2 bands, with the forward band being the same as a middle band with sling swivel of a 3-band rifled musket. Front sight is different from the sight of the 3-band rifled musket. It has a larger base with a pinched sight form. It is the same as appears on the Richmond carbine. Nosecap is of brass on the stock extension forward of the front band. Buttplate is also of brass. Lockplate is marked forward of the hammer ‘CS / Richmond Va’ and at the tail is dated ‘1864’.” The scarcest configuration of Richmond Armory products is the 33″ Richmond Rifle. Production didn’t start until 1864; however, Richmond rifles are found with a variety of lock dates, locks and parts. Battlefield gleanings and captured damaged guns resulted in a variety of 33″ Richmond rifles. Scarcest of the 33″ rifles have mostly Richmond manufactured parts and will be dated 1864, as is this gun. CONDITION: Bbl is brown/black with pitting. Rifling is discernible, though pitted. Bbl retains orig front and rear sights, though leaves of rear sight are restored. Bands, trigger guard, and sling swivels are brown. Ramrod appears orig to this gun; however, it appears converted from an earlier musket. Stock is sound with areas of orig varnish. Stock exhibits a hairline crack back of lock along with scratches and nicks. Initials “BCL” are carved into flat of left buttstock. These initials probably denoted the Confederate who carried this gun. 4-31247 JS161 (12,000-16,000)

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1035

RICHMOND ASSEMBLED RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 58. This Richmond assembled rifle used various Springfield parts, including 1863 clamping bands and 1861 Springfield lock and iron nosecap. Springfield stock retains its U.S. surcharged buttplate. Bbl has had all proofmarks removed, but does exhibit the pinched front sight that is only found on Richmond rifles and carbines. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states, “Model 1863 (with clamping bands) stock with Model 1861 barrel with 1861-dated lockplate, all combined. Typical of the mixture of parts found on these Richmond reworked rifles made of battlefield-recovered parts of rifled muskets.” CONDITION: Bbl is cleaned with scattered pitting. Rear sight is Springfield, and it retains scattered finish under pitting. Cone and clean-out screw in bolster are replaced. Rifling is good. Ramrod is Springfield and is about 31″ long. Stock is solid with scattered nicks and scrapes and several wood putty repairs. 4-31259 JS163 (4,000-6,000)

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1036

RICHMOND ASSEMBLED RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 58. This heavily pitted, untouched gun has well patinaed, Richmond brass nosecap, Richmond pinched front sight, and other Springfield and Richmond parts. Ramrod, which fits gun nicely, is blacksmith forged. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “ In addition to the production of new rifled muskets, musketoons, rifles, and carbines, Richmond repaired an unknown total number of rifled muskets, many of which were undoubtedly the gleanings of battlefields left in the possession of Confederate troops. A certain number of these Richmond repaired weapons may be conclusively identified as having been repaired at Richmond. All share the same characteristics. In each case, the barrel has been shortened from 40” to 33” with the addition of a new front sight of the wide base pinched form used on the Richmond rifle and rifled carbine. The front barrel has been removed leaving only the original rear and middle barrel. The shortened forestock has been given a brass nosecap. Most of these rifles show hard usage, into battle, lost, recovered, repaired, and reissued. They are all true “veterans” of the war. Model 1863/61. A gun with character, well used with a tin wrist repair nailed in place. All parts heavily rusted, but overall giving a great, “out of the barn” look.” CONDITION: All iron parts are brown/black and heavily pitted. Rifling in bore is very good, though pitted. Stock has numerous dings and scratches. Old wrist repair, as described above, is solid and matches overall condition of gun. 4-31260 JS164 (4,000-6,000)

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1037

RICHMOND ASSEMBLED RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 58. This Richmond assembled rifle consists of 1861-dated Springfield lock, stock, and bbl. Bands are of Confederate manufacture, showing proper Richmond styles and placements of “U’s”. Buttplate is orig to stock and surcharged “U.S.”. When bbl was shortened, a pinched rear sight was added. When stock was shortened, it was nicely tapered and Confederate brass nosecap was attached. Bbl retains orig Springfield rear sight. This is a classic example of a Richmond alteration of a battlefield gleaned, and probably damaged, rifled-musket. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “In addition to the production of new rifled muskets, musketoons, rifles, and carbines, Richmond repaired an unknown total number of rifled muskets, many of which were undoubtedly the gleanings of battlefields left in the possession of Confederate troops. A certain number of these Richmond repaired weapons may be conclusively identified as having been repaired at Richmond. All share the same characteristics. In each case, the barrel has been shortened from 40” to 33” with the addition of a new front sight of the wide base pinched form used on the Richmond rifle and rifled carbine. The front barrel has been removed leaving only the original rear and middle barrel. The shortened forestock has been given a brass nosecap. Most of these rifles show hard usage, into battle, lost, recovered, repaired, and reissued. They are all true “veterans” of the war. Model 1861.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are cleaned with pitting. Bbl retains no markings. Lock markings are clear and discernible. No discernible inspectors’ marks are found in stock. Stock overall is sound with scattered dings and scrapes. Ramrod is probable replacement. 4-31255 JS162 (4,000-6,000)

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1038

RICHMOND ASSEMBLED RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 58. This Richmond constructed rifle consists of an 1855 rifled musket stock with patchbox and Bridesburg 1863-dated lock. Bbl appears to be model 1855, Harper’s Ferry or Richmond manufactured. Rear sight was not removed to check mortising to ascertain. This assemblage has a nice, untouched look, being dark and uncleaned. You are bidding on a relatively as found “attic” or “barn-found” Richmond assembled rifle from captured parts. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “In addition to the production of new rifled muskets, musketoons, rifles, and carbines, Richmond repaired an unknown total number of rifled muskets, many of which were undoubtedly the gleanings of battlefields left in the possession of Confederate troops. A certain number of these Richmond repaired weapons may be conclusively identified as having been repaired at Richmond. All share the same characteristics. In each case, the barrel has been shortened from 40” to 33” with the addition of a new front sight of the wide base pinched form used on the Richmond rifle and rifled carbine. The front barrel has been removed leaving only the original rear and middle barrel. The shortened forestock has been given a brass nosecap. Most of these rifles show hard usage, into battle, lost, recovered, repaired, and reissued. They are all true “veterans” of the war. Model 1863 Bridesburg.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: All metal surfaces are dark and pitted. Bbl exhibits no discernible rifling. Markings are mostly discernible, though partially obscured by pitting and patina. Brass nosecap exhibits deep patination. Model 1855 ramrod is brown and smooth. Stock is sound with scattered areas of orig varnish with numerous scratches, nicks, and dings. About a 1″ area of wood behind bolster is burned out from use. 4-31256 JS166 (4,000-6,000)

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1039

RICHMOND ASSEMBLED RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 58. This particular Richmond assemblage utilizes an 1859-dated, Model 1855 Springfield lock with Maynard tape device and door removed. Stock appears to be 1855 pattern manufacture also. Bbl is either Richmond or Harpers Ferry manufacture as denoted by broken “P” in “VP” proof. Bbl is also missing rear sight, so set screw mortise appears Richmond Manufacture. Rear band appears to be Richmond manufactured, as front band appears Springfield or Harpers Ferry. Brass nosecap and buttplate are of Richmond manufacture. Pinched front sight of Richmond manufacture has been cut to a short blade. You are bidding on an apparently all orig, Richmond assembled rifle from various battlefield gleaned parts. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “In addition to the production of new rifled muskets, musketoons, rifles, and carbines, Richmond repaired an unknown total number of rifled muskets, many of which were undoubtedly the gleanings of battlefields left in the possession of Confederate troops. A certain number of these Richmond repaired weapons may be conclusively identified as having been repaired at Richmond. All share the same characteristics. In each case, the barrel has been shortened from 40” to 33” with the addition of a new front sight of the wide base pinched form used on the Richmond rifle and rifled carbine. The front barrel has been removed leaving only the original rear and middle barrel. The shortened forestock has been given a brass nosecap. Most of these rifles show hard usage, into battle, lost, recovered, repaired, and reissued. They are all true “veterans” of the war. Model 1855.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Iron surfaces are gray/brown with scattered pitting. Brass buttplate and nosecap are well patinaed over several scratches. Stock is solid with scattered scratches, dings, and gouges. Rifling in bbl is very good. Ramrod is gray and pitted and appears to be a cut-down 1855 ramrod for rifled musket. 4-31253 JS167 (4,000-6,000)

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1040

RICHMOND ASSEMBLED RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 58. This Richmond altered rifle began life with parts from a Colt Special Model 1861 musket. This specimen, being dated 1863. Gun retains Colt lock, stock, bbl, and bands or the orig Colt configuration. Richmond has shortened bbl to 33″, incorporating its distinctive pinched sight, tapering the forestock to accept Richmond brass nosecap. Gun appears overall to be all orig and in very good condition. Murphy & Madaus in their text show a similarly altered Colt Special Model alteration by Richmond, but with 36″ bbl. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “In addition to the production of new rifled muskets, musketoons, rifles, and carbines, Richmond repaired an unknown total number of rifled muskets, many of which were undoubtedly the gleanings of battlefields left in the possession of Confederate troops. A certain number of these Richmond repaired weapons may be conclusively identified as having been repaired at Richmond. All share the same characteristics. In each case, the barrel has been shortened from 40” to 33” with the addition of a new front sight of the wide base pinched form used on the Richmond rifle and rifled carbine. The front barrel has been removed leaving only the original rear and middle barrel. The shortened forestock has been given a brass nosecap. Most of these rifles show hard usage, into battle, lost, recovered, repaired, and reissued. They are all true “veterans” of the war. Model 1861 Colt.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are gray/brown with scattered pitting. Rifling to bore is very good. Stock is sound with scattered dings and scrapes. 4-31257 JS165 (4,000-6,000)

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1041

CONFEDERATE, SOUTH CAROLINA ASSEMBLED, MODEL 1842 MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. This “attic” condition musket appears in as-found condition. Colors of metal and wood match throughout with possible addition of ramrod. Bbl has standard “VP” / eagle proof as found on some Palmetto muskets, and buttplate is surcharged “SC” which is also typical of Palmetto muskets. Lockplate is unmarked and shows some metal stress lines typical of Confederate or U.S. Condemned manufacture. Stock is made from parts assembled from 2 guns. Note the marriage under rear band of forestock and buttstock. This gun has been together and stored for a long time such that staining and patina match both pieces of wood to bbl band and musket bbl. Mr. Michel described this gun as follows: “Generally a Model 1842 musket in configuration, but stock from buttplate to rear band is crudely made with forend joined under rear band, which is turned rearward to support join between butt and forestock. Buttplate is from Palmetto musket, stamped ‘SC’. Lockplate is unmarked but does not appear to have been filed to remove markings. Inletting for lockplate has been done with circular hand drill. Three bands are all orig M1842 type. Although stock is pieced, both sections are unquestionably orig and vintage”. CONDITION: All metal surfaces are uncleaned, brown and pitted. Stock in 2 pcs is sound with scattered dings, scrapes, and scratches with no discernible markings. Bbl proofs and “SC” surcharge are clear. 4-31251 JS198 (3,000-5,000)

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1042

MISSISSIPPI CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF HALL RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 64. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Alteration to percussion of Model 1819 Hall rifle. Breechblock marked ‘J. Hall / H. Ferry / US / 1831’. This alteration performed by brazing a striker onto the bottom jaw of the original flintlock hammer. This newly formed hammer strikes vertically a nipple screwed into the breechblock from which the original pan has been filled in. Exactly the same alteration appears on a North contract Hall rifle, on which the top of the receiver is stamped ‘S. Carolina'”. Murphy & Madaus show in Confederate Rifles and Muskets, plates 23 & 24, p. 334, a nearly identical specimen of an 1832-dated Hall that is attributed to a Mississippi armory. This alteration, according to Murphy & Madaus, was “thought to have either occurred at the Holly Springs Armory or Columbus (Briarfield) Arsenal. As with those altered rifles, the chamber block was removed from the frame, and the flintlock battery was removed from the block. Upper and right surfaces from the block were ground to eliminate the projections from the pan, its fence, and the frizzen supports. The indentation in the upper right top of the block that permitted the toe of the frizzen to rotate, however, was not filled in. The former vent was enlarged and threaded; into the newly-threaded hold a percussion code was screwed at a 90-degree angle to the top of the block. The old flintlock cock was cut above the throat, so as to remove the jaws and jaw screw. In place of those parts a new top section incorporating a striker and spur was brazed to the lower section of the cock. The percussion hammer then was re-attached to the chamber block, and the block was re-inserted into the frame. No reassembly marks were applied to the rifles during the process of alteration”. You are bidding on a complete and orig example of the distinctive, massive, brazed-hammer variety of Confederate altered Halls. CONDITION: Bbl and other metal surfaces are black with scattered scuffing and pitting. Stock is sound with scattered dings and scratches. Initials “WJC” are scratched lightly into right side of buttstock. Multi-grooved Hall rifling is very good. Front bbl band is partially cleaned, showing a brown surface under the black surface of other bands and rest of metals surfaces on this gun. Ramrod is bright. 4-31286 JS146 (3,000-5,000)

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1043

FAYETTEVILLE ALTERATION OF A HALL CARBINE. SN NSN. Cal. 52. Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes this carbine as follows: “Alteration to percussion and carbine length of a Model 1819 Hall rifle. Breechblock is marked “J. Hall / H. Ferry / U.S / 1834″, which is typical of Fayetteville alterations. Breechblock has the frizzen removed and the flintlock hammer replaced with a percussion hammer with knurling on the hammer spur. A nipple has been screwed into the area of the former pan. The bbl has been cut to a length of some 22-3/4” and the forestock shortened accordingly. It is held by the orig rear and middle bands, both being pin-fastened with the orig double-strap front band discarded. Trigger guard bow is retained, but the hand grip curving strap of the orig rifle is replaced by a strap following the contour of the stock. Edges of the stock appear to have been thinned and smoothed. This gun is illustrated inConfederate Carbines & Musketoons by John Murphy, p.99, plates 108-109.” CONDITION: Metal surfaces are gray with scattered pitting and staining. Multi-grooved Hall rifling is very good. Stock is sound with a 2″ chip missing at muzzle and a 9″ x 1/2″ sliver missing below frame on left side exposing the mechanism. There is also a 1-1/4″ x 1-1/4″ repair to top of buttstock just behind frame. 4-31287(5,000-7,000)

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1044

TEXAS CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF HALL RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 64. Mr. Michel describes this alteration as follows: “Alteration to percussion of Model 1819 Hall rifle. Breechblock marked ‘J. Hall / H. Ferry / U.S. / 1832’. This alteration performed by brazing a somewhat crude percussion hammer onto the base of the orig flintlock hammer. No remnant of the bottom jaw or hole remains. Nipple has been screwed into the orig pan which retains the rear fence. This example was recovered in Texas”. You are bidding on a most unusual and possibly unique welded hammer conversion as described above. CONDITION: Iron surfaces are brown with scattered nicks, dings, and pitting. Breech screw and trigger are replaced. Stock has several wood repairs and is missing several pieces, including a 5″ x 3/4″ sliver missing along bbl at rear band. Multi-groove rifling in bbl is worn but discernible. 4-31284 JS151 (2,000-4,000)

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1045

TEXAS CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF HALL RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 64. The following described gun was found in Texas and is a most unusual alteration to percussion. Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes this gun as follows: “Alteration to percussion of Model 1819 Hall rifle. Breechblock marked ‘J. H. Hall / H. Ferry / U. S. / 1831’. This alteration performed by a striker inserted between the jaws of the hammer with a percussion nipple screwed into the former pan. This example was recovered in Texas and shows the effect, not uncommon, of a blowout resulting from loose powder being ignited inside the breech. Wood on the right side has been completely blown away alongside the breech and striker. Top jaw and jaw screw of hammer shorn off”. Similar examples are described, but not shown, in Murphy & Madaus. CONDITION: Gun appears in as-found condition. All metal parts are brown and pitted. Stock exhibits several breaks and missing approx. 11″ section on right side as described above allowing mechanism to be shown. Gun lacks ramrod and top jaw and striker to nipple. 4-31283 JS150 (2,000-4,000)

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1046
Revised: 10/19/2007

Correction)Barrel bore is .54 cal; breech block is .69 cal.

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF A HALL RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 64. This gun is similar to so-called “Western” alterations pictured in Murphy & Madaus; however, this hammer is more petite and better made. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows, “Alteration to percussion of Model 1819 Hall rifle. Breechblock is marked ‘J. H. Hall / U.S. / 1839’. This alteration was performed by brazing a percussion hammer onto the orig flintlock hammer base and screwing a nipple into the area of the former pan which has been built up to support and reinforce the nipple. This type of alteration is akin to those characterized as typical ‘Western’ alteration. Missing mainspring and trigger”. An example shown with no mating numbers. You are bidding on a possibly unique Confederate-altered Hall with a very distinctive hammer. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are brown/black with numerous dings, scratches and pitting. Bore is filled with insect nests, and rifling cannot be ascertained. Stock is solid with some insect damage and hairline cracks. About a 1″ x 1-1/2″ piece of wood is missing and repaired behind frame on top of buttstock. Forestock is restored forward of middle band as is ramrod and front 2 bands. Mainspring and trigger are broken. 4-31285 JS149 (2,000-4,000)

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1047

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF A HALL RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 64. This is another interesting variation of a Confederate Hall alteration, utilizing the brazing and peening of striker to base of orig flint hammer. Old jaw screw is utilized and top is peened over the new striker. Similar alterations are shown in Murphy & Madaus, but nothing exactly like this. You are bidding on a possibly unique variation of a Confederation Hall alteration. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Alteration to percussion of M1819 Hall rifle. Breechblock marked “US / S. North / Midltn / Conn / 1835”. This alteration performed by peening a striker onto the bottom jaw of the original flintlock hammer and a nipple screwed into the former pan. This type of alteration is similar to but not identical to Alterations on other North contract rifles with a “S. Carolina” stamp on the left flat of the frame.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are gray/brown with scattered pitting. Ramrod and rear band are probable replacements. Stock is sound, showing numerous scrapes and scratches. Orig inspector’s cartouche is still visible on left side of stock. 4-31282 JS148 (3,000-5,000)

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1048

MISSISSIPPI CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF A HALL RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 64. This is another variation of the Confederate alteration thought to be performed at either Holly Springs or Columbus, MS. The most discernible difference in these variations is size and shape of hammer. Murphy & Madaus show in Confederate Rifles and Muskets, plates 23 & 24, p. 334, a nearly identical specimen of an 1832-dated Hall that is attributed to a MS armory. This alteration, according to Murphy & Madaus, was “thought to have either occurred at the Holly Springs Armory or Columbus (Briarfield) Arsenal. As with those altered rifles, the chamber block was removed from the frame, and the flintlock battery was removed from the block. Upper and right surfaces from the block were ground to eliminate the projections from the pan, its fence, and the frizzen supports. The indentation in the upper right top of the block that permitted the toe of the frizzen to rotate, however, was not filled in. The former vent was enlarged and threaded; into the newly-threaded hold a percussion code was screwed at a 90-degree angle to the top of the block. The old flintlock cock was cut above the throat, so as to remove the jaws and jaw screw. In place of those parts a new top section incorporating a striker and spur was brazed to the lower section of the cock. The percussion hammer then was re-attached to the chamber block, and the block was re-inserted into the frame. No reassembly marks were applied to the rifles during the process of alteration”. You are bidding on a near “attic” condition Mississippi conversion of a Hall rifle. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Alteration to percussion of M1819 Hall rifle. Breechblock marked “J. H. Hall / H. Ferry / US / 1832”. This alteration performed by reforming the original flintlock hammer with the top configuration, that of a percussion hammer. The hammer still retains the circular opening of the original configuration. A nipple has been screwed into the breechblock from which the original pan has been fitted in and filed off. Provenance: Described and type shown, ”Confederate Rifles and Musketoons“ by John Murphy and Howard Madaus, p. 316.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are gray with old cleaning, scattered staining and pitting. Stock exhibits several hairline cracks, and a 1″ x 1-1/2″ piece of wood that is broken at base at back of frame. Multi-grooved Hall rifling is very good. 4-31281 JS147 (3,000-5,000)

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1049

AUSTRIAN LORENZ RIFLE. SN NSN. This Austrian Lorenz rifle is complete and in near “attic” condition. It comes complete with adjustable rear sight. Use of adjustable rear sight is a more scarce variant of these Austrian import rifles. Traces of orig finish on bbl around breech. It shows little use. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states: “Probably second only to British Enfields in the number of arms imported to the Confederacy was the Austrian Lorenz Model 1854 rifle. This example, with lockplate marked ‘860’ indicating a date of manufacture of 1860, is fitted with a folding leaf sight. Complete with original bayonet and tools”. You are bidding on a fine example of a popular, imported rifle of the Civil War, complete with cleaning jag, gun tool, and matching bayonet. CONDITION: Bbl is gray/brown with some areas of scattered staining and light pitting. Lock is gray and smooth. Other metal surfaces are gray/brown with scattered staining and pitting. Stock retains some orig finish with fairly sharp edges. 4″ hairline crack in buttstock does not affect aesthetics. Rifling in bore is very good, though pitted. 4-31324 JS130 (1,000-1,500)

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1050

AUSTRIAN LORENZ RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 54. This is a nice example of a popular Civil War import to both North and South. This rifle has 37-1/4″ bbl, fixed rear sight. This example is complete and orig, accompanied by orig bayonet, cleaning jag, and gun tool. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states: “Probably second only to British Enfields in the number of arms imported to the Confederacy was the Austrian Lorenz Model 1854 rifle. This example, with lockplate marked ‘860’, indicating a manufacturing date of 1860, is fitted with a fixed sight. Complete with original bayonet and tools.” This is a nice, complete, near “attic” condition example of a popular Confederate imported rifle. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are gray/brown with scattered pitting. Wood is very good with some small nicks and dents. Accompanying tools match nicely with patina. Rifling in bore is very distinct though pitted. 4-31325 JS129 (1,000-1,500)

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1051

SOUTH CAROLINA ENFIELD RIFLED MUSKET. SN 412. Cal. 58. There is little doubt this is the finest SC surcharged blockade run Enfield rifled musket in existence. It is also among and may be the best Blockade Run Enfield rifled musket in private hands. Musket exhibits raised grain in its stock. Retains almost all its orig blue finish on bbl. Traces of muted case colors are visible on lock. Gun is 1 of only a few with 5/8″ “SC” letters on right side of buttstock and smaller “SC” stamped on top of comb in front of buttplate. Buttplate and ramrod are both engraved with SN 412. Accompanying bayonet is maker marked “Robinson” and still retains 1/2 the orig blue finish on its socket and is serial numbered “1660”. Most Model 1853 Enfield rifled muskets have 39″ bbls, as prescribed by English regulations; however, some SC guns, such as this, have 40″ bbls, and this gun is .58 cal, as opposed to .577. We know this caliber due to the final gauging proof of “24” which translates to .580 caliber. As with most serial numbered, Blockade Run, Confederate guns, a “JS” over anchor proof is stamped behind trigger guard and buttstock. This marking on this example is especially well struck. Behind the “JS/Anchor” proof is the stock maker’s mark “Isaac Hollis & Sons”. According to Mr. Michel’s notes, this gun was orig purchased from Bannerman in the 1930s. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Pattern 53 Enfield rifled musket with buttstock stamped “SC” designating shipment to South Carolina. Lockplate marked, forward of hammer, “Tower / 1862” and at tail with crown. Under buttstock is stamped “Isaac Hollis & Sons” and “JS” over anchor. The buttplate tang is engraved with numbers typical of those associated with Enfields imported by the Confederacy, in this case 412. The breech is a special, octagonal, patent breech. The piece is in almost mint, unfired condition, having been purchased originally from the ????????? in the 1930s,” CONDITION: Bbl is smooth and retains 95%+ orig blue finish with light pitting at breech. Bbl muzzle is scratched from where bayonet has been attached. Lock is gray and smooth with traces of muted case color. Rifling in bore is well-defined, though pitted. Brass nose cap, trigger guard, and buttplate are smooth with scattered scratches. Stock shows raised grain on some surfaces. Several dings and gouges are scattered on stock surface. Vice mark is present on both sides of stock forward of lock. Buff leather sling that is attached is overall very good. Locking ring on bayonet is broken and missing a piece approx. 1/4″. This locking ring could easily be replaced. Bayonet socket retains about 50% of its blue finish. Bayonet has accompanying scabbard which is very good overall with a soiled buff frog. Frog is English War Dept. inspected. 4-31308 JS126 (15,000-18,000)

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1052

CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUN ENFIELD RIFLED MUSKET. SN 1859. Cal. 577. This is a deeply patinaed, untouched, attic or barn found Enfield. This was a standard arm of the Confederate Army. Probably more of these guns were used than any other single arm. SN 1859 engraved on buttplate. Stock is also marked with the “JS / anchor” and the letter “S” in front of buttplate SN. Lock is marked and dated “1861 / Tower”. 39″ bbl has correct Birmingham proofs, but is missing its rear sight. Accompanying gun is a nice, added buff sling and an unsurcharged Enfield bayonet. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Pattern 53 Enfield rifled musket. Lockplate marked forward of hammer, “Tower / 1861” and at tail. The tang of the buttplate is engraved with the inventory number “1859” used to keep track of arms shipments to the Confederacy.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Iron surfaces are brown/black with pitting, especially at bbl breech. Brass nosecap, trigger guard, and buttplate are deeply patinaed. Stock is solid with scattered dings, scratches, and scrapes. Bore of bbl shows no discernible rifling. Bayonet socket is brown; blade is partially cleaned and is bent. Ramrod is heavily pitted. 4-31311 JS140 (2,000-4,000)

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1053

BLOCKADE RUN LONDON ARMORY COMPANY ENFIELD RIFLED MUSKET. SN 8450. Cal. 577. This is a standard Model 1853 Enfield rifled musket; the most popular weapon of the Confederate infantryman during the Civil War. Lock is marked “1861 / L. A. Co.” forward of hammer, and rear of hammer with a crown and “VR”. “VR” commemorated the current British monarch, Queen Victoria (Victoria Regina). Stock has about a 7/8″ cartouche which reads “London Armory Company / 1861”. SN is cut into buttplate tang. London Armory muskets are not found with a “JS / anchor” marked as are most other serial numbered Blockade Run Enfields. Accompanied by leather sling and bayonet with engraved numbers on socket, engraved vertically in 2 lines “23 / 156”. Initials “AP” are found carved on left side of buttstock, probably by the Confederate who carried this gun. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Patten 53 Enfield rifled musket manufactured by London Armory Co., a principal supplier of arms to the Confederacy. Lockplate marked, forward of the hammer, “1861 / L. A. Co.” and at the tail, crown over “VR”. The tang of the buttplate is engraved with the inventory number “8450” used to keep track of arms shipments to the Confederacy.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Bbl is brown with areas of pitting. Bbl flat at tang has been ground, continuing onto tang. Bbl exhibits discernible rifling, though pitted. Lock is gray with clear markings. Brass mounts are smooth with scattered dings and scrapes. Stock exhibits dings, scratches, and several small cracks. Ramrod is dark and pitted, matching condition of bbl. Bayonet socket exhibits traces of finish and blade is cleaned. 4-31310 JS141 (4,000-6,000)

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1054

STATE OF GEORGIA BLOCKADE RUN ENFIELD RIFLED MUSKET SN 3441. Cal. .577.A fine example of Model 1853 Enfield rifled musket bought by the state of GA during the Civil War. We know this gun is GA due to the large, 1″ “G” stamped into right side of stock. This gun is maker marked “Barnett / London” on lock and has correct London visual proofs on bbl. On top of stock comb in front of buttplate, there is an oval cartouche containing the letters ‘CH’ over ‘1’. This is a known Confederate viewing mark and will later be explained in text in current production on Blockade Run arms. There is also a SN stamped in bottom of buttplate, which is the accepted style of Barnett, instead of having SNs engraved. Ramrod is maker marked “Preston”. The accompanying bayonet is maker marked “Dear…” You are bidding on a very fine GA Enfield that is untouched. All markings are crisp and fine. It would be difficult to find a better GA-used Enfield. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Pattern 53 Enfield rifled musket with buttstock stamped “G” designating shipment to the state of Georgia. Lockplate marked, forward of hammer, “Barnett / London” and at the tail, the comb of the buttstock just forward of the buttplate tang is marked with an oval cartouche enclosing “CH / 1” with the “CH” indicating acquisition by Caleb Huse as purchasing agent for the Confederate States.” CONDITION: Gun appears in near “attic” condition. It appears all orig with exception of replaced rear sling swivel. Lock, bbl, ramrod, and bands are brown with scattered scrapes and pitting, especially at bbl breech. Bore still exhibits good rifling. Stock is sound with scattered scrapes and scratches. Proofmarks and letter “G” are well struck and quite discernible. Bayonet retains most of its orig blue finish on socket. 4-31309 JS125 (6,000-10,000)

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1055

CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUN ENFIELD RIFLE. SN 269. Cal. 577. This iron mounted Model 1856 rifle has 33″ bbl with correct Birmingham proofs and saber bayonet lug. Lock is marked and dated “Tower / 1861”. SN is cut into ramrod and stamped on bottom of buttstock, as is proper in iron mounted guns. In front of SN on buttstock is stamped “Joseph Wilson” and a crisp, clear “JS” / anchor marking is found adjacent. This is a fine and rarely encountered Blockade Run Model 1856 rifle. This gun is all orig and authentic as found. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states, “Confederate import Enfield rifle in superb condition. Stamped on underside of butt ‘269 / Joseph Wilson / JS / anchor’. The ramrod is also engraved with ‘269’. Overall the rifle appears almost unfired. The numbers indicate that this rifle was destined to arm the Confederacy, but considering its seemingly unused condition, it was likely seized as it was being run through the blockade and never issued. Ex-Raplh Arnold coll”. This is no doubt one of the very finest guns of this pattern, and probably fewer than 10 examples are known. CONDITION: Bbl is gray/bright with scattered areas of pitting. Rifling in bore is very good with pitting. Other metal surfaces are gray with scattered pitting. Stock is very good with very good, crisp markings and scattered scrapes and scratches. 4-31317 JS138 (6,000-9,000)

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1056

CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUN ENFIELD RIFLE. SN 2983. Cal. 577. This unusual rifle is pretty much a standard Model 1856 Enfield rifle with 33″ bbl; however, a brass patchbox has been professionally added during the war. We know this is a wartime addition because this patchbox is engraved “Plucked from the enemy”. Gun is “JS / anchor” marked. Lock is marked “1861 / Tower” and bbl has appropriate Birmingham proofs. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Pattern 56 Enfield Rifle. Lockplate marked forward of hammer “1861 / Tower” and at tail, The Confederate inventory number “2983” is engraved in the tang of the buttplate, and the “JS” / anchor stamp appears on the underside of the buttstock to the rear of the triggerguard plate. A brass patchbox has been added, on which has been somewhat crudely scratch engraved, “Plucked from the Enemy”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Bbl is gray with scattered pitting and staining. Lock is dark with pitting as his hammer and bands. Brass nosecap, trigger guard, and patchbox are all cleaned and smooth. Buttplate has numerous nicks and scratches. Rifling in bore is very good, though pitted. Rear sight is missing. Sling swivels, ramrod, and at least 1 buttplate screw are replaced. 4-31316 JS144 (2,000-4,000)

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1057

CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUN ENFIELD RIFLE. SN 12. Cal. 577. This “attic” condition rifle has seen hard use. It is missing rear sight, 1 lock screw, and stock is broken and repaired. This gun exhibits heavy, red/brown patina on brass nosecap, trigger guard, and buttplate. Buttplate is serial numbered “12” with engraved numbers, as is ramrod. Bbl is dark and brown, deeply pitted, and ground around breech, showing no discernible proofs. Stamped in stock is maker’s mark “Bentley & Playfair, Birmingham”. Also stamped in bottom of stock next to trigger guard, but not as discernible, is the “JS” / anchor markings. Trigger guard is missing sling swivel. Inside trigger guard is written in white paint “1950”, possibly the date this gun was bought or found. Despite missing parts and damage, this is still an attractive gun with an extremely low, 2-digit serial number, and 33″ Model 1856 brass-mounted rifles are scarce. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Pattern 56 Enfield rifle. Lockplate marked forward of the hammer “1861 / Tower” and at tail. The Confederate inventory number “12” is engraved on the buttplate tang.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Bbl is brown/black with pitting, tool marks and grind marks around breech. Lock, band, and ramrod are brown with scattered pitting. Brass has heavy patina. Stock is sound with exception of old break above wrist which has old, glued repair. A piece of wood about 2″ x 1/2″ is missing from stock opposite lock, along with screw and its escutcheon. About a 2″ crack is present in buttstock. Rear sight and rear sling swivel are missing. 4-31315 JS139 (2,000-4,000)

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1058

CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUN ENFIELD ARTILLERY CARBINE. SN 409. Cal. 577. This is a rarely found, Confederate imported Model 1858 artillery carbine or musketoon. It is “JS / anchor” marked on bottom of stock with stock maker “James Webley”. SN on buttplate engraved longitudinally and letter “S” is stamped in front of buttplate tang. Lock is marked and dated “1861 / Tower”. Bbl has correct Birmingham inspection proofs. This is a very nice, sound gun overall and would be difficult to upgrade. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Pattern 58 artillery carbine (or musketoon). Lockplate marked, forward of hammer, “1861 / Tower” and at tail with crown. The piece has both the Confederate inspector’s stamp under the buttstock just to the rear of the trigger guard plate consisting of a “JS” surrounding an anchor and the Confederate inventory number 409 engraved on the tang of the buttplate.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Bbl is brown with good markings with pitting around breech. Bayonet lug is sharp, as are front and rear sights. Rifling in bore is very good. Lock and hammer are smooth and gray/brown, as are bands. Ramrod is cleaned and is gray/white overall. 4-31313 JS142 (5,000-7,000)

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1059

CAPTURED ENFIELD SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN NSN. Ca. 577. This 1863-dated carbine is in very good, untouched, “attic” condition, being orig and complete. Gun exhibits Birmingham Small Arms trademark stamped in a 3/4″ rnd cartouche. Correct Birmingham proofs are stamped in bbl at breech. Lock is marked “1863 / Tower”. Stock maker’s name is stamped in bottom of buttstock, but is no longer discernible. What are thought to be Confederate inspection or acceptance marks of an anchor over an “S” is stamped on top of buttstock comb, adjacent to buttplate. Faintly scratched on left side of buttstock can be read, “Captured Oct 21 . . . at . . . by . . . “. With a magnifying glass and a little imagination, someone can probably ascertain the rest of this faint but present inscription. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Pattern 56 Enfield cavalry carbine. Lockplate marked, forward of hammer, “1863 / Tower” and at rear there is a small “Birmingham Small Arms Trade” stamp in the right side of the buttstock. The left side of the buttstock is a faint and largely illegible capture description.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are gray/brown with scattered pitting. Rifling in bbl is very good, though pitted. Brass trigger guard, nosecap, and buttplate are smooth with scattered nicks and scratches. Stock is sound with good markings and scattered scrapes, gouges, and scratches. Stock still exhibits a portion of its orig varnish. 4-31312 JS143 (2,000-4,000)

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1060

CAPTURED CONFEDERATE-USED ENFIELD SEA SERVICE MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. Approx. 75. 30″ smooth bore bbl with numerous British proofs, including bbl condemnation marks of nose-to-nose broad arrows. Bbl is broad arrow proofed and dated “1854 / Enfield”. This gun, obsolete in England by the time of the Civil War, is one of the first British Blockade run guns that saw Confederate service. Attached to this gun was old tag which reads, “This rifle was taken from Fort Jackson, La. a few days after its surrender with the permission of Commander D. D. Porter by Robert T. Edes , Asst. Surg. U.S.N. of the Second Division of the Mortar Flotilla; / Lieut. Comd’r R. R. Breese”. This is a rare relic of one of the early battles of the war in the pursuit of New Orleans. This gun appears in near “attic” condition, orig and complete in every regard. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Pattern sea service musket. Lockplate marked forward of hammer, “1854 / Enfield” and at tail, crown / “VR”. With the musket is an old paper label reading “This rifle was taken from Fort Jackson, La a few days after its surrender with the permission of Commander D. D. Porter. Robert T. Edes Ass. Surg. USN of the Second Division of the Mortar Flotilla Lieut Comdr RR Reese”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are brown with scattered staining and pitting. Bore is smooth and pitted. Brass mounts are smooth and cleaned. Stock is sound with clear markings, several small chips, cracks, and scattered stains. Front sling swivel is correct type and style; however, it may be replaced. 4-31319 JS137 (3,000-5,000)

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1061

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF VIRGINIA MANUFACTORY MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Bolster alteration to percussion of Virginia Manufactory musket. Lockplate of musket marked at tail ‘Richmond 1803’. Bbl marked at breech with county designation ‘Nansemond’. This type of alteration with large, three faceted bolster is believed to have been done by Francis Persignon of Richmond between October 1861 and September 1862. All components are marked with orig assembly number ‘5’. Alteration re-assembly, markings are a combination of letters and Roman numerals such as on this musket, ‘MXII'”. This gun, once in the collection of Giles Cromwell, is illustrated in Bulletin No. 52 of the American Society of Arms Collectors on p. 38. It is also pictured and described in Murphy & Madaus’ Confederate Rifles and Muskets on pp. 567-569. You are bidding on a fine, all orig and complete Confederate-altered 1805-dated VA Manufactory musket pictured in several publications. A better gun would be difficult to obtain. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are smooth and brown with scattered pitting, especially at bolster. All metal parts, including trigger guard, trigger guard base, sideplate, bbl, buttplate, all 3 bands, and bayonet lug, are assembly numbered “5”. 1″ of bbl tang, behind tang screw, is missing. Stock is sound with some varnish remaining. Normal nicks, scrapes, and gouges are present on stock. Large set of initials are scratched on side of buttstock. Gun retains both orig sling swivels. Accompanying bayonet is cleaned, stained, and pitted but fits gun nicely. 4-31276 JS208 (3,000-5,000)

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1062

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF VIRGINIA MANUFACTORY MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Bolster alteration to percussion of Virginia Manufactory musket. Lockplate of musket marked forward of hammer ‘Virginia Manufactory’ and at tail ‘Richmond 1815’. Alteration by the Union Manufacturing Co. of Richmond. Bolster of muskets altered by Union Manufacturing Co. is rounded at bottom and frequently shows round trace of brazed screw filling the hole drilled through to the vent hole. Lockplate is filed to conform to rounded contour of bolster. Re-assembly marks are generally the letter ‘U’ and a number, or just a number, in this case ‘6’. Mainspring is missing”. CONDITION: Bbl is brown and smooth with pitting. Lock is smooth, brown with good markings. Buttplate and trigger guard are brown with pitting. Assembly number “4” occurs on buttplate, sideplate, trigger guard, and bbl. Bands are not assembly marked and are replaced. Stock forward of rear band is restored. Remainder of stock is solid with scattered dings, cracks, scratches, and gouges. 4-31274 JS207 (3,000-5,000)

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1063

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF VIRGINIA MANUFACTORY ARTILLERY MUSKETOON. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Bolster alteration to percussion of Virginia Manufactory artillery musketoon. Lockplate of musket marked forward of hammer ‘Virginia Manufactory’ and at tail ‘Richmond 1818’. All components marked with orig assembly number ‘6’. Alteration by Thomas J. Adams in Richmond with three faceted bolster and re-assembly Roman numeral groups on inner face of new percussion hammer, inner face of lockplate, underside of bbl, and left side of stock opposite lockplate”. VA Manufactory artillery musketoons are scarce enough in flint, much less with a Confederate alteration to percussion. This particular gun is illustrated and described on pp. 31-32 of Murphy & Madaus’ Confederate Rifles and Muskets. This gun is orig and complete, and it would be hard to find another specimen. CONDITION: Metal surfaces cleaned, gray and pitted. Assembly number “6” appears on bands, sideplate, trigger guard. This number is not discernible on exterior of buttplate; however, buttplate is certainly orig to this gun with matching metal surfaces to rest of gun. Stock is good and sound, with scattered scratches, nicks, and dings. Stock has old repair on wood opposite lock. 4-31275 JS206 (3,000-5,000)

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1064

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF VIRGINIA MANUFACTORY MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. This gun, once in the collection of Giles Cromwell, is illustrated in his article in the American Society of Arms Collectors Bulletin No. 52 on p. 34. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Cone-in-bbl alteration to percussion of Virginia Manufactory musket. Lockplate of musket marked forward of hammer ‘Virginia Manufactory’ and at tail ‘Richmond 1811’. Rear bbl band also dated ‘1811’. All components are marked with orig assembly number ’77’. Confederate alterations by the cone-in-bbl method are very rarely encountered. This type alteration has been tentatively attributed to John B. Barret & Co. in Wytheville, Virginia”. CONDITION: This gun appears orig and matching in every regard. Assembly number “77” appears on all metal parts, including bands, trigger guard, buttplate, sideplate, and bbl. 4-31277 JS209 (3,000-5,000)

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1065

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF VIRGINIA MANUFACTORY MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Bolster alteration to percussion of Virginia Manufactory Musket. Lockplate of musket marked at tail ‘Richmond 1804’. Bbl marked at breech with county designation ‘Hanover’. This type alteration with two faceted bolster was done by S. C. Robinson. All components marked with orig assembly number ‘4’. S. C. Robinson re-assembly markings are pairs of Arabic numerals or Roman numerals, in this case ’20 / 8′. With bayonet numbered ‘7’”. You are bidding on a fine, Confederate converted, Virginia Manufactory musket with all matching assembly numbers that includes a VA Manufactory angular bayonet with similar assembly number. Bayonet is SN 7 whereas the rest of the gun has assembly number 4. This gun was once in the collection of Giles Cromwell and is described in Murphy & Madaus’ Confederate Rifles and Muskets on p. 624. CONDITION: Bbl is brown/black with pitting, especially at bolster. County regimental markings on bbl flat are partially discernible, as “Hanover” can be read. Other metal parts are brown with pitting and are all assembly stamped “4”. Ramrod appears to be a Confederate, blacksmith-forged addition. Stock is sound and solid with scattered dings, gouges, and scratches, and a hairline crack forward of lock. Initials “WWS” are stamped in buttstock. About 2″ of wood behind bolster is repaired. Accompanying bayonet with assembly number “7” is is cleaned and has pitting. 4-31278 JS210 (3,000-5,000)

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1066

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF FRENCH MODEL 1777 COLONIAL & MARINE MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Murphy & Madaus, in their book, Confederate Rifles and Musketoons, show a nearly identical musket converted in Richmond on p. 33, which was converted by T. J. Adams of Richmond, VA, and that gun is currently at the Rush Hawkins Memorial. It is amazing to think that muskets originally used in Colonial America and possibly the War of 1812 could be reused during the American Civil War. This gun, like gun at Rush Hawkins Memorial, is regimentally marked to a City of Richmond regiment, though markings have been mostly obscured during alteration. Mr. Michel describes his gun as follows: “These muskets were originally made at the Tulle Armory in France for VA in 1786-87. Lockplate is marked forward of the hammer ‘Tulle’. Configuration of the musket is consistent with French pattern with brass buttplate, trigger guard, sideplate, and front and rear bands. Middle band with sling swivel is correctly made of iron. Alteration to percussion was done by S. C. Robinson & Co. of Richmond, VA using its characteristic two facet brazed bolster. Top of the barrel shows remnants of the city marking, ‘Richmond’.” You are bidding on a gun about 220 years old that remarkably probably saw use in the War of 1812 and Civil War for Virginia troops from the city of Richmond. CONDITION: Iron surfaces are gray with scattered pitting. Brass surfaces, including bands, trigger guard, and buttplate are smooth and patinaed with scattered scratches. Stock is sound with numerous scratches, nicks, and gouges. There is about a 3/4″ gap where wood is broken out behind lock. 4-31263 JS192 (3,000-5,000)

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1067

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF BROWN BESS MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Alteration to percussion of 3rd Model Brown Bess British musket. While the alteration is by use of a drum rather than the characteristic brazed bolster, the alteration is clearly intended for military usage with a large military nipple and hammer of M1842 type. This musket is typical of many altered in the South by small gunsmiths or entrepreneurs. Recovered outside Richmond, VA, it has been left in rusty ‘untouched barn mint’ as proof of its all orig character.” You are bidding on a possibly unique Confederate-altered Brown Bess musket in untouched, “attic” or “barn” condition. CONDITION: Bbl, lock, and hammer are brown and heavily pitted. Ramrod is brown, smooth, and pitted. Brass buttplate, trigger guard, and ramrod pipes are all heavily patinaed. Scattered drips of paint are found on various parts of gun. Stock is missing nosecap, but otherwise is sound and complete, with scattered nicks, cracks, and gouges. 4-31264 JS191 (3,000-5,000)

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1068

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF STATE OF VIRGINIA SWAN CONTRACT MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. This rare Swan contract musket is beautifully marked with its Dinwiddie regimental markings and is illustrated and described on pp. 164-165 of Murphy & Madaus’ Confederate Rifles and Muskets. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “This musket is one of the 7,831 imported muskets delivered to VA by contractor James Swan of Boston during the period from 1797 to 1801. The cone in bbl alteration to percussion is the method of A. G. Dabney at the Phoenix Foundry in Lynchburg, VA. Bbl is marked ‘Va REGt DINWIDDIE’. Configuration of the musket is consistent with those delivered by Swan to VA, being British Brown Bess in outline, albeit somewhat crudely made by comparison. Forend of this piece has been restored.” CONDITION: Bbl is brown and pitted, as is lock. Bbl markings are quite distinct. Stock is restored starting about 3″ forward of lock, forestock is totally restored, as are ramrod pipes, ramrod, and nosecap. Brass buttplate and trigger guard exhibit good patina. Buttstock exhibits scratches, nicks, and scuffs, and a couple small repairs forward of lock. 4-31261 JS194 (3,000-5,000)

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1069

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF STATE OF VIRGINIA SWAN CONTRACT MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. This gun is illustrated and described in Murphy & Madaus’ book Confederate Rifles and Muskets on pp. 625-627. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “This musket is one of 7,831 imported muskets delivered to Virginia by contractor James Swan of Boston during the period from 1797 to 1801. Brazed bolster alteration to percussion was done by S. C. Robinson of Richmond using the characteristic two faceted bolster. Bbl regimental markings ‘ORANGE’ are visible though indistinct. Virginia regimental marking is indistinct. All orig throughout.” CONDITION: Bbl and lock are gray/brown with pitting. Brass nosecap, ramrod thimbles, trigger guard, and buttplate are all cleaned with scattered scratches and patina in protected areas. Ramrod is replaced. Last 10″ of stock toward muzzle is restored. Stock otherwise is sound and solid with a 3″ repair of bottom of forestock forward of hammer. County bbl markings are weak but “Orange” is discernible. 4-31262 JS193 (3,000-5,000)

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1070

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MODEL 1817 U.S. RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 54. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Alteration to percussion of Model 1817 made by N. Starr & Co. Lockplate marked forward of hammer ‘N. Starr & Co’ in arch over ‘US’ and at tail, ‘Middtn / Conn / 1843′. In addition to the alteration to percussion, the forestock has been altered by removing the middle band, creating the appearance of a two-band rifle and in addition insetting a saber bayonet lug with guide key onto the barrel. Brazed bolster of unique design with a vertical rear and horizontal bottom is believed to be the work of William B. and Cyrus Fisher of Lynchburg, Virginia. Ex-James Artimus collection.” This Confederate percussion alteration is pictured and described on pp. 227-230 in Murphy & Madaus’ Confederate Rifles and Muskets. This gun is in fine, untouched condition with a fine, rifled bore and orig finish on much of the gun. This is a most unusual conversion. Not only was ignition system changed from flint to percussion, the overall gun was “modernized” by relocating the front band sufficiently far back such that the middle band could be eliminated and a brazed saber bayonet lug was attached for use of saber bayonet. You are bidding on a superb condition, possibly unique restoration by Lynchburg, Virginia gunsmiths that is completely orig, authentic, and complete. CONDITION: Bbl is smooth and brown with some orig brown finish. Slight rust and pitting at bolster. Bbl markings are very clear. Lock was cleaned, probably during conversion. Lock retains good surfaces, but orig U.S. markings are weak and partially obscured. Other metal components including trigger guard and buttplate are smooth with some orig finish. Rear band is uncleaned, gray, with traces of finish. Front band has a mottled, cast appearance. Small “2” is stamped in face of front band and also on bayonet lug, which was added during alteration. Accompanying ramrod is brass-tipped Mississippi. It is gray and pitted. Stock is very good, showing orig varnish, scattered dings and scratches, and residual cartouches from orig flint inspection. Patchbox contains extra nipple, cleaning jag, worm, and nipple wrench/screwdriver combination tool. Rifling and bore are very good. 4-31302 JS189 (4,000-8,000)

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1071

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MODEL 1803 HARPERS FERRY RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 54. Mr. Michel describes this rifle as follows: “This alteration involved both the alteration of the flintlock to percussion and the reconfiguration of the stock to that of a two-band rifle. Retaining the orig rifle configuration to the buttstock, the forend with its under bbl rib has been replaced with a rear brass single band (both M1841 rifle in type) connected with a new wooden forestock. In addition, the orig rifle style trigger guard has been replaced with a M1841 trigger guard plate and trigger guard bow, as well as the trigger itself. The brazed bolster alteration to percussion is also unique as yet not identified as to the maker. A similar bolster does appear to have been used to alter M1817 rifles (see consignment nos. 4-31302 and 4-31303) and a Whitney Model 1812 (see consignment no. 4-31270). It is believed that these alterations may be the work of William B. and Cyrus Fisher of Lynchburg, Virginia.” You are bidding on a rare, brass-mounted, Confederate alteration of a Harpers Ferry rifle, probably altered by William and Cyrus Fisher of Lynchburg, Virginia. Gun is very solid overall. Stock is sound with no repairs. The gun must have gotten a little wet at some point, as metal surfaces are pitted, whereas the brass is nice. Bbl still exhibits nice rifling. This rare alteration is similar to Consignment No. 4-31302, which is a similar conversion rifle. CONDITION: Bbl and lock are brown with some cleaning and heavy pitting. Brass bands, trigger guard, buttplate, and patchbox have scattered dents, scratches, and varying patination. Tulip-tipped ramrod is brown with scattered pitting. Stock is solid. Several chips, some small splinters are missing along ramrod channel. About a 3/4″ chip is missing from toe of stock. 4-31301 JS190 (3,000-6,000)

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1072

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MODEL 1817 U.S. RIFLE. SN NSN. Cal. 54. Mr. Michel describes this rifle as follows: “Alteration to percussion of Model 1817 rifle made by S. North. Lockplate marked forward of hammer ‘US / S. North’ and at tail ‘MIDDLtn / CONN / 1829’. Other than the alteration to percussion, this rifle has not been modified as has the M1817 rifle reconfigured to two-band with a saber bayonet lug added (see consignment number 4-31302) which has same unique bolster alterations. These alterations are believed to have been made by William B. and Cyrus Fisher of Lynchburg, Virginia.” You are bidding on a very rarely offered alteration believed to have been done by Fisher of Lynchburg, Virginia. CONDITION: Bbl is cleaned and re-browned, as is buttplate. Lock and hammer are cleaned. Bands are mismatched, but all of correct type. Ramrod is originally from a Mississippi rifle. Patchbox hinge screws are replaced, as are screws in trigger guard. Bbl and lock are pitted overall. Rear sight is restored as is nipple. Bore exhibits no rifling. Stock is sound and solid with scattered scratches and small dings. A 1-1/2″ crack is exhibited in toe. Orig inspector’s cartouche is still visible. 4-31303 JS188 (3,000-6,000)

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1073

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MODEL 1812 WHITNEY MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Alteration to percussion of Model 1812 Whitney musket. Lockplate marked forward of hammer ‘N. Haven’ in scroll. Alteration is with brazed bolster of unique configuration, vertical in rear and horizontal at bottom, which is believed to be the work of William B. and Cyrus Fisher of Lynchburg, Virginia. This distinctive shaped bolster and equally distinctively shaped hammer all appear together on the alteration of a Model 1803 (Consignment No. 4-31301) and a Model 1817 rifle”. You are bidding on a fine, complete, rare William & Cyrus Fisher, Lynchburg, VA alteration. There probably cannot be a better example known. CONDITION: Bbl is cleaned with scattered staining and pitting. Orig flint bbl proof “P” is well-defined. Lockplate is gray with New Haven markings partially removed. Matching bands and the trigger guard are brown, smooth, and stained. Ramrod and buttplate are gray/bright with scattered staining and pitting. Stock is solid and sound with some orig finish. Residual cartouche and various assembly stampings in wood are crisp. Stock exhibits numerous dents, nicks, scrapes, and scratches. Gun retains both orig sling swivels. 4-31270 JS203 (3,000-5,000)

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1074

IDENTIFIED 21ST VIRGINIA (STONEWALL BRIGADE) CARRIED CONVERSION MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this musket as follows: “A Model 1816 musket altered to percussion by Colt, this piece eventually found its way into the hands of William Exall of the 21st Virginia Infantry. His name ‘W. Exall’ appears carved into the right side of the butt of the musket and ’21st Va’ and ‘Co F’ are carved into the left side of the butt. With the musket is a handwritten note dated September 12, 1936 which reads, ‘My Dear Doctor, Mrs Foley of the Richmond Civil War Records Office states that there were two Exalls in the 21st Virginia Regt., one Charles and a William. The latter enlisted April 21, 1862, in Richmond and was killed at Bath, Jan 3rd, 1863. I concluded after reading her testimonial that the inscription on your musket indicates that your musket after examining it with the utmost scrutiny have determined that weapon was indeed used by William Exall, Late of the Stonewall Brigade. Your contribution of this relic to the museum would be most gratifying. My Deepest and heartfelt thanks. Felix Gross’. Also with the musket is a separate card indicating that the musket and note were purchased at auction of a private home in Gordonsville, Virginia. This musket is one altered by Colt for Russia in 1855-56 but which Colt ended up selling to Italy in 1860 after Russia abrogated the contract. These arms were then seized by English authorities while en route. Undoubtedly then sold to Confederate agents looking to purchase arms in England, the musket afterward returned to America and ultimately into the hands of William Exall.” You are bidding on a musket used by a Virginia soldier killed early in 1863 who was a member of the famed Stonewall Brigade along with an accompanying note dated 1936 relating its incredible history. CONDITION: Bbl, lock, trigger guard, and buttplate are cleaned and heavily pitted. Rear band is dark and pitted. Front bands are cleaned smooth and stained. Front band lacks locking spring. Ramrod is of correct style, but shortened about 10″. Stock contains numerous scratches, dings, and stains and has been lightly sanded. Buttstock has repaired crack at toe. Scratched ID in stock is possibly commemorative, as it appears carved after stock was orig cleaned. 4-31273 JS187 (10,000-30,000)

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1075

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MODEL 1812 SPRINGFIELD MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Bolster alteration to percussion of Model 1812 Springfield musket with ‘Wickham improvement’ stud retained bands. Lockplate marked forward of hammer, eagle / ‘Springfield’, and at tail ‘1815’. Altered by Union Manufacturing Company of Richmond with typical rounded bottom bolster and lockplate filed to conform to reounded contour. Reassembly number ’17’ on inside of percussion hammer. With bayonet”. CONDITION: Metal surfaces cleaned overall with scattered pitting. Lock markings are discernible, as are bbl proofs. Stock is cleaned. Scattered scratches, nicks. Accompanying bayonet is surcharged and inspected US and is very good overall. 4-31279 JS199 (3,000-5,000)

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1076

MONROE BLUES ALTERATION MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Several states, both North and South, had a “Monroe Blues” as a company designation. A little detective work could potentially solve this mystery, as this gun also has an inset star with “3rd” engraved on it, so if there is a 3rd Regiment with a company name “Monroe Blues,” you would probably have a match. This gun potentially was to be used as a shooting prize, and maybe was a prize, but never inscribed to a recipient. Presentation plaque on reverse of buttstock simply reads “Presented by / The Monroe Blues / To” leaving a blank space for a name. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “This alteration to percussion of a Model 1840 Nippes contract musket is actually a re-alteration of a Nippes/Maynard primer musket alteration as evidence by the plugged hole to the rear of the drum bolster. That hole was orig for the primer box (now removed) attachment screw. On the left side of the butt a brass eagle over banner plate has been inlet and pinned to the stock. There is light engraving of the eagle’s feathers and eye, but the banner is unengraved. A brass star has been inlet into the top of teh wrist of the stock to the rear of the breechplug tang. The star is engraved ‘3rd’. A silver plaque has been inlet and pinned into the left side of the buttstock. It is engraved ‘Presenteed by the Monroe Blues to’ but no name has been engraved as well”. CONDITION: Metal surfaces all cleaned with scattered pitting. Accompanying bayonet is surcharged U.S. Overall good condition and fits gun well. Stock is sound and cleaned with scattered nicks and scratches. 4-31280 JS195 (3,000-5,000)

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1077

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MODEL 1816 NATHAN STARR MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Brazed bolster alteration to percussion of Model 1816 N. Starr. Lockplate of this musket is marked forward of the hammer ‘US / N STARR’ and at the tail ‘MIDELTN / CONN / 1829 / *’. This alteration is typical of that done by Union Manufacturing Co. of Richmond. Round bottom bolster is fitted to lockplate which has been filed to conform to the rounded contour of the bolster. Inside of percussion hammer is numbered ’51’. With bayonet”. PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection CONDITION: Metal surfaces are cleaned gray/brown with scattered pitting. Lock & bbl markings are well easily read. Accompanying bayonet is US surcharged and inspected and is in overall good condition. 4-31473 JS197 (3,000-5,000)

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1078

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MODEL 1816 HARPERS FERRY MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Brazed bolster alteration to percussion of Model 1816 Harpers Ferry musket. Lockplate of musket marked forward of hammer with eagle / ‘US’, and at tail ‘Harpers Ferry 1823’. Brazed bolster is rounded at bottom with brass pan remnant filed to conform to rounded contour of bolster. Alteration resembles rounded shape of Union Manufacturing Co., except for a notch where the curve of bolster meets lockplate. Orig assembly number on parts is ‘4’. Alteration reassembly number is a small ‘5’ which appears on the inside of new percussion hammer, breechplug tang, and bbl. With bayonet”. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are brown/gray with scattered pitting. Ramrod is cleaned but is orig. Accompanying bayonet is brown with US surcharge and in overall good condition. Stock is sound with numerous scratches and nicks. Buttstock is scratched with soldier’s intitials “HL / Co. D”. 4-31272 JS196 (3,000-5,000)

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1079

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF A MODEL 1816 B. EVANS/PHILADELPHIA MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Bolster alteration to percussion of Model 1816 Evans/Philadelphia musket. Lockplate of musket marked forward of hammer ‘B. Evans’ in upward curve over ‘Phila’. Note: this musket is rare even in its unaltered state. Reilly, in United States Martial Flintlocks on p. 101 notes only a single specimen with this marking is known to the author. This alteration is typical of that done by Union Manufacturing Co. of Richmond, Virginia. Round bottom bolster is fitted to lockplate which has been filed to conform to its rounded contour. Inside of percussion hammer is marked with typical ‘U’ over re-assembly number, in this instance ‘309’. ‘309’ also appears stamped inside lockplate. Mainspring is missing. With bayonet”. CONDITION: Metal surfaces cleaned and are gray/brown with pitting. Stock is sound with scratches, nicks, and gouges and old varnish. Accompanying bayonet is US surcharged and inspected and is very good overall. Middle band is stamped “213”. Other two bands are not numbered. 4-31269 JS202 (3,000-5,000)

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1080

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MODEL 1816 HARPERS FERRY MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Bolster alteration to percussion of Model 1816 Harpers Ferry musket. Lockplate is marked forward of the hammer with an eagle over ‘US’ and at the tail ‘Harpers Ferry 1829’. Alteration with its two faceted bolster with a flat bottom resembles those performed by S. C. Robinson of Richmond, but narrow, unmarked hammer and crude fitting of the bolster atop the cut off pan is unlike the quality of Robinson alterations. Most likely this is simply one of the many alterations performed by any number of gunsmiths in the Confederacy to meet the exigencies of the war”. You are bidding on an “attic” condition, untouched, all orig and complete, classic, Confederate, brazed bolster alteration with a very distinctive hammer showing typical hand-forged manufacture of Southern blacksmith. CONDITION: All metal surfaces are brown with pitting. Stock is sound and solid with scattered scrapes, nicks, and gouges. Cartouches are still visible from when gun was inspected in flint. 4-31271 JS201 (3,000-5,000)

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1081

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MODEL 1816 POMEROY MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Confederate alteration of Model 1816 Pomeroy. Alteration by brazing a raised platform on right side of breech of bbl for insertion of nipple (a reinforced ‘cone in bbl’ alteration). Cut off outside surface of pan is stamped with number ’37’. This number is also stamped inside hammer. Lockplate marked forward of hammer with eagle over ‘US’ and at tail, ‘1818’”. You are bidding on an “attic” condition, Confederate alteration of unknown manufacture which is nicely preserved. CONDITION: Metal surfaces with exception of replaced ramrod are brown, uncleaned with staining and pitting. Stock is solid with numerous scratches, dents, and dings. Hairline crack is found opposite lock. About 1″ x 1/2″ piece of wood is missing from ramrod channel. 4-31266 JS205 (3,000-5,000)

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1082

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MODEL 1816 POMEROY MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Alteration to percussion of Model 1816 L. Pomeroy musket. Lockplate marked forwward of hammer, eagle over ‘L. Pomeroy’ and at tail ‘1824 / U.S.’. Curved bottom brazed bolster performed by Daniel C. Hodgkins & Sons of Macon, GA. This same Hodgkins pattern alteration appears on longarms as early as 1795 pattern Springfields to Model 1817 rifles. Although records indicate that Hodgkins altered thousands of such weapons, surviving examples are quite rarely encountered”. CONDITION: All metal parts are cleaned with scattered pitting with exception of ramrod, which is replaced. Lock markings are crisp and discernible. Bbl tang exhibits matching date to that on lock. Stock is sound and solid, exhibiting residual cartouche, scattered scratches, scrapes, dings, and gouges. 4-31265 JS204 (3,000-5,000)

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1083

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MODEL 1816 B. EVANS/VALLEY FORGE MUSKET. SN NSN. Cal. 69. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “Bolster alteration to percussion of Model 1816 Evans/Valley Forge musket. Lockplate of musket marked forward of hammer ‘B. Evans and Valley Forge’ in oval surrounding an eagle, and ‘1824’ at tail. Alteration by S. C. Robinson of Richmond with typical two facet bolster. Condition of musket is lacking (old wrist break screw repaired and forend from middle band to front band has been replaced along with replacement bands) but this alteration is very rare on this type contract musket”. CONDITION: Bbl, trigger guard, buttplate, and front band appear untouched and brown with pitting. Stock forward of rear band is restored, as are front bands. Stock otherwise is sound with old repair just above wrist, done with 2 large wood screws. Bbl and lock markings are discernible but weak. 4-31268 JS200 (3,000-5,000)

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1084

FINE “ARSENAL TYPE” CONFEDERATE BOWIE KNIFE AND EXCEPTIONAL ORIGINAL SCABBARD. One of the finest arsenal made Confederate fighting knives to come to market in recent times. Of classical style and massive size, this original Bowie type knife retains its original leather scabbard in outstanding condition. The knife measures 23 ½ “overall with the blade being single edged with a lightly clipped point which is 1 ½” wide at the ricasso. The “D” guard is mad from a single wide strap of iron with a convex face and flat interior terminating at the pommel with a simply rounded end and with a pointed simple quillon. The grip is of plain, undecorated walnut carved in bulbous form with an iron ferrule at the base. Accompanying this wonderful and massive Confederate knife is its original scabbard. I’ve seldom encountered a confederate knife scabbard in such condition. The scabbard is fashioned of black bridle leather with a single line tooled decoration at the throat. The scabbard is sewn up the back and folded and sewn on top where the drag is applied. In addition, the scabbard is secured by three (only two remain) small lead rivets. The drag is of soldered tin, secured by two iron pins. A small horizontal loop is cut from the face of the scabbard near the throat and sewn on the reverse is a single leather belt loop-affixed in slanted fashion. Many confederate style “D” guard knives are on the market. Seldom do we encounter one of this size in arsenal style with such classical characteristics as to make its manufacture and use in the Confederacy unquestionable. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “An arsenal-made, D-guard Bowie knife in its original scabbard. The knife is well made and the blade untouched having only age staining. The hilt and scabbard are also in the same fine, untouched condition. The scabbard is hand sewn at the bottom edge which is reinforced by three lead rivets, one of which is now missing. The tip is made of sheet tin. On the reverse of the scabbard is a single, long, diagonally placed belt loop. Overall, this is one of the finest examples of this classic style of D-guard Bowie.” These bayonets are most likely the product of the Georgia Armory, Milledgeville, GA. CONDITION: : Excellent. The knife is in excellent condition, tight all the way around. The blade is about 50% bright and 50% mottled dark grey. No major pitting has occurred. The black iron “D” guard show light surface rust but retains a wonderful untouched patina. The grip is fine. The exceptional leather scabbard is also in excellent condition with only the most minor surface crackling and age. One of the lead rivets is missing and one of the iron pins that secure the drag is missing. It fits the knife like a glove except for some minor shrinkage in length. 4-31398 JS0 (6,000-8,000)

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1085

GEORGIA MADE CONFEDERATE BOWIE KNIFE. This knife has many characteristics of the Etowah Iron Works made Bowie knives by Mark Cooper. The turned wood handle, brass crossguard, ferules, and pommel are so typical of his knives, and we believe this to be one. According to Cooper’s records, about 100 of these knives were made in various styles for various members of his sons’ companies of Georgia troops. This particular example has a 10-1/4″ double-edged blade which is very thick and well made. This knife is similar, if not identical, to a knife pictured in an image on p. 212 in William Turner’s book Even More Confederate Faces. Cooper Iron Work knives are rarely offered. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This well made, spear point Bowie knife has a 10-3/8” blade which is 1-7/8” wide. The hilt is identical to that of the D-guard Bowie belonging to Captain Eli M. Seago of Company F, 20th Georgia Infantry. It is also identical to the hilt of the Bowie knife protruding from the belt of the Southern infantryman whos photograph appears at the top left of page 212 in William Turner’s book, ”Even More Confederate Faces“. While the blade is different in that it is a spear point rather than the clipped point of Captain Seago’s Bowie, the length and width of the blades of each knife are about the same. At one time, this knife was identified as having been made at the Etowah Iron Works of Etowah, Georgia, which apparently made “handsomely mounted, of excellent workmanship and most beautiful finish” knives for the Atlanta Grays in 1861. In Daniel D. Hartzler’s book, ”Confederate Presentation and Inscribed Swords and Revolvers,“ wherever the Seago knife is pictured and described, however, he attributes the knife as the product of the Cooper Iron Works at Cartersville, Georgia.” CONDITION: Blade is gray with areas of staining and pitting. Brass has pleasant patina, as does wood handle. Guard exhibits several bends and top of pommel shows numerous dents and scratches. 4-31400 JS15 (6,000-8,000)

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1086

CONFEDERATE CLIP POINT BOWIE KNIFE WITH SCABBARD. This massive clip point Bowie is over 21″ long. Blade is 16″ long and 2″ wide. 7″ long iron crossguard protects a formed wood grip, retained with 2 peened over iron pins which hold grip to blade tang. Scabbard is sewn black leather. Scabbard once had a sewn belt loop which is now missing. Deeply scratched into the leather scabbard is “2th VA.” Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This massive, clip point Bowie knife has a 16” long, 2” wide blade. The crossguard is of iron and the tang of the blade is held to the wood grip where it has been inlet for 3¼” by two iron rivets peened over iron washers. The scabbard is of heavy leather, all hand sewn. It has lost its belt loops, which from the stitching holes were two loops crisscrossed on one side and a single, diagonal loop on the other, enabling its owner to wear the knife at an angle on either side of his body. Deeply scratched into the leather of the scabbard is “2th Va”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray/bright with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Crossguard exhibits good patina, as does wood handle and iron retaining pins. Black leather scabbard retains much of its orig black coating. Tip of scabbard has an old, glued repair. Spine of leather scabbard appears to have a contemporary leather repair. 4-31401 JS17 (5,000-8,000)

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1087

CONFEDERATE D-GUARD BOWIE KNIFE WITH BELT. This classic, Confederate, blacksmith-made, 17″ clip-point Bowie knife has blade over 12″ long and exhibits a 7-1/2″ false edge. Blade shows orig grinding marks. D-guard is beautifully made with a large, flat, bulbous quillon. Tiger maple grips exhibit two 1/2″ iron ferules. Scabbard is tin, covered in leather, with a belt sewn to scabbard. Belt retains its orig hand-forged roller buckle. This feature of sewn belts to leather scabbards was typically done in the period, though due to the fragility of such combinations, rarely did these survive with the belts still attached. This knife has orig tag with old brown ink stating “Taken from a dead Rebel by Ezequiel W. Chamberlain, Company K, 4th Mass Regiment on the battlefield of Camp Bislum”. This is as fine an example of a battlefield-found, classic, blacksmith-made, Confederate knife that you will ever have the chance to buy. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate D-guard Bowie knife with a massive, upswept, clipped point. The scabbard is tin covered with leather and stitched directly onto the belt rig which closes with an iron roller buckle. With the rig is an old tag reading, “Taken from a dead Rebel by Ezekiel W. Chamberlain, Com K, 4th Mass Rat on the battlefield of Camp Bislum”. The “D”-guard is of iron with an iron ferrule at the ends of the grip which appears to be of maple wood. The knife blade is 12” long and 2-1/8” wide.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Knife overall appears to be a typical “attic” find. Blade is gray with scattered staining. Tip of blade is blunted. Orig tool marks on blade are present. Iron hilt and roller buckle are uncleaned and have good patina. Maple grips show several age cracks but are sound and show good patina. Orig tag is laminated between two pieces of plastic. Leather belt is complete but is fragile. Leather covering scabbard is almost complete and shows several cracks on reverse. 4-31399 JS14 (6,000-8,000)

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1088

CONFEDERATE CLIP POINT BOWIE KNIFE WITH SCABBARD. This massive, 18-1/2″ knife with 12-3/4″ clip point blade is a classic Confederate, blacksmith-made knife. This knife exhibits an iron crossguard with pewter ferule, brass butt cap, and wood grip. Scabbard is sewn leather with numerous brass rivets protecting cutting edge and retained belt loop. This knife is a fine example of a Confederate side knife in its orig scabbard. It appears to have gotten wet at some time in its life, and blade has large areas of rust and pitting which have never been cleaned. In the scabbard, this knife will display as well as any Confederate side knife available. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This massive Bowie knife with its 12¾” long and 2” wide blade is the classic type with which proud Confederate soldiers displayed in the photographs they had taken as they departed for the war. It is well made with a heavy iron crossguard, pewter ferrule, well formed wood grip, and brass pommel plate, through which the tang of the blade is secured. The thick leather scabbard is seamed with 17 copper rivets, all of which, save one, are present. The scabbard is reinforced by an extra strap of leather at the throat and has a heavy leather belt loop secured by two of the same copper rivets as on the edge.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Overall knife appears in “attic” condition. Blade exhibits areas of orig polish, though blade has areas of heavy pitting and staining. The 3 different metals composing grip all exhibit good patina. Wood retains good patina and shine. Scabbard is crazed and missing orig black surface at final 5″ on obverse. 4-31402 JS16 (5,000-8,000)

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1089

CONFEDERATE D-GUARD BOWIE KNIFE. This massive, 19″ clip-point bladed, fighting knife utilizes a US 1860 cavalry hilt and pommel as this knife’s hilt. Hilt has had the branches removed. Pommel still retains “US” inspector marks. Grip is also a cavalry grip with sgl iron wire. Scabbard is backsewn leather with brass drag and throat attached with iron wire. Scabbard throat has serial number which is no longer legible. Opposite side of throat has a center mounted brass frog button. Scabbard mounts are decorated with incised lines. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This massive, 19” blade cutlass is made with a 1¾” wide, brazed blade mounted onto a modified brass sword hilt with branches removed to create a single branch guard. The grip is covered with tarred canvas wound with heavy iron wire. The scabbard is heavy, dark, russet leather with a brass tip and throat.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray/bright with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Blade retains orig protective leather washer. Guard is bent over at spine. Grip appears tarred or painted and retains much of this orig finish, though chipped and worn at high spots. Iron wire wrap is intact and complete. Brass guard and scabbard mounts have been cleaned. 4-31397 JS13 (2,000-4,000)

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1090

FAYETTEVILLE SABER BAYONET. This is among the most difficult of all Confederate bayonets to find in good condition, and this one is excellent overall. 21-1/2″ blade still has areas of orig shine and polish. Feathered brass hilt exhibits fine patination and retains orig spring and button. Only marking on this bayonet is a letter “L” stamped on spine of hilt. Accompanying scabbard appears orig and could not fit bayonet any better. Scabbard is back sewn with pin-retained brass mounts. Throat has round frog button. This is the finest Fayetteville bayonet we have ever seen at auction. These bayonets were well used, and few survived with blade and hilt this fine. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This Fayetteville sword bayonet in its original scabbard is one of the finest in existence. The 21¾” blade is uncleaned with only some age staining. The hilt is also untouched and marked only with a small “L” on the back. The scabbard is original to this saber bayonet and while there is flaking to the leather, it is still sound and complete.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is bright/gray with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Brass hilt and scabbard mounts exhibit good patina. Spring retains traces of blue under an overall pitted surface. Scabbard body is crazed with about 30% of black coating chipped away. 4-31332 JS24 (6,000-8,000)

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1091

CONFEDERATE SABER BAYONET MADE BY BOYLE & GAMBLE, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. This is a fine example of a well-made Confederate bayonet in its orig scabbard. Though this bayonet is unmarked, we know it is a product of Boyle & Gamble, because similar specimens have cast guards saying “Boyle, Gamble & McFee, Richmond, VA”. This bayonet has a 20-1/4″ blade. Hilt is hollow-cast, and on this specimen is very nice with no dents. Often, these bayonets are dented. This bayonet appears in uncleaned, “attic” condition. Scabbard is top sewn with brass throat with Boyle & Gamble style, spade-shaped frog button. This same shape frog button is found on other Boyle & Gamble products that used frogs. Throat is retained with a single pin, as was the brass drag, which unfortunately is missing. You are bidding on a high-condition Boyle & Gamble bayonet in the rarely found orig Boyle & Gamble scabbard. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This Boyle, Gamble & McFee saber bayonet is one of the finest in existence. The 20¼” blade is uncleaned with only some age staining. The hilt is also uncleaned and retains its aged brass color. The scabbard is original to this bayonet and correct in pattern. The leather has some flaking and is loose at the stitching at the top of the scabbard but is otherwise sound and complete.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray/bright with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Hilt and scabbard throat are very good, exhibiting only minor scratches and dents. Orig spring and button are present with scattered pitting. Leather scabbard body has come unsewn at seam and has lost much of its orig black surface. 4-31333 JS27 (4,000-6,000)

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1092

COOK & BROTHER SABER BAYONET. SN 1311. This Cook & Brother bayonet was made in Athens, Georgia. Only the earliest Athens, Georgia bayonets are serial numbered, and this was one of the first one or two hundred, as about 1,000-1,200 rifles were made in New Orleans, and the SN started thereafter in Athens. Blade measures 21-1/2″ and shows the typical Yahtaghan curviture with unstopped fuller, typical of this manufacturer. This bayonet is marked with SN on crossguard and is fitting with triangular-shaped slot in hilt for the saber bayonet lug. Accompanying scabbard for this bayonet is brass mounted and back sewn. Mounts were attached with wire. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Cook & Brother saber bayonet in brass-mounted, leather scabbard. This full length blade at 21½” has a heavy yataghan curvature with an unstopped fuller which extends 6” from the tip to 1¼” before the crossguard. This bayonet is marked with serial number “1311” on the crossguard and is fitted with the triangular-shaped slot in the hilt for the saber bayonet lug. The serial number range, combined with the triangular slot, indicate this bayonet was produced after the move to Athens, Georgia, when the rifles were no longer fitted with square saber bayonet lugs on the barrel and were intended to utilize one of the brass bayonet adapters made by the company with a triangular lug. The scabbard has a brass throat and tip and is sewn at the lower edge.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray with areas of pitting, staining, and old grinding marks. Spring and button are possibly replaced. Scabbard is solid but dry. Drag is cleaned and missing retaining wires and glued into place. 4-31294 JS26 (2,000-4,000)

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1093

COOK & BROTHER SABER BAYONET. SN 2. This saber bayonet exhibits a 21-1/2″ blade with a distinct Yataghan curvature with an unstopped, fuller which extends 6″ from the tip to 3″ from the crossguard. Bayonet is marked with SN on crossguard, retains orig spring and button and has brass-mounted scabbard of unknown manufacture. Because of this very low serial number and the square slot in hilt, this bayonet was produced in New Orleans, where the rifles were fitted with a square bayonet lug affixed to the barrel, as opposed to later production in Athens, GA, where the saber bayonets were affixed to the barrels using a detachable brass bayonet adapter with a triangular lug fitting into a triangular slot in the hilt of the bayonet. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Cook & Brother saber bayonet in brass-mounted, leather scabbard. The full length blade at 21½” has a distinct yataghan curvature with an unstopped fuller which extends 6” from the tip to 2” before the crossguard. This bayonet is marked with the serial number “2” on the crossguard and is fitted with the square slot in the hilt for the saber bayonet lug. This low serial number, combined with the square slot, indicates this bayonet was produced in New Orleans, where the rifles were fitted with a square bayonet lug affixed to the barrel as opposed to subsequent production in Athens, Georgia, where the saber bayonets were fixed to the barrels using a detachable, brass bayonet adapter with a triangular lug fitting into a triangular slot in the hilt of the bayonet.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Rough cast hilt exhibits nice patina. Orig spring and button show scattered pitting. Scabbard mounts are cleaned. Leather body of scabbard is dry and recolored black. 4-31293 JS25 (2,000-4,000)

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1094

CONFEDERATE SABER BAYONET. SN 190. This saber bayonet has recently been identified as being manufactured by Louis Froelich at the Confederate States Armory in Kenansville, NC. This well-made bayonet exhibits a blade just over 19″ and SN is stamped into the pommel of its brass hilt. Froelich made bayonets of different blade lengths, but blade characteristics are all similar, as are the hilts. This is a fine example of a Confederate bayonet in “attic” condition. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate saber bayonet manufactured by Louis Froehlich at the Confederate States Armory located in Kenansville, North Carolina. This is the version with the shorter, lighter blade, only 19¼” long, with an unstopped fuller running from 1¼” from the hilt to 5” from the tip. The stud lock and stud lock spring are intact. The pommel cap is numbered “190”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray/bright with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Hilt retains good patina and areas of shine under old varnish. Trace of orig blue is found on orig locking spring. 4-31328 JS21 (2,500-3,500)

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1095

CONFEDERATE SABER BAYONET. This bayonet, thought to be made by Louis Froelich at the Confederate States Armory, Kenansville, North Carolina, is complete with its orig Confederate-made scabbard and frog. This is the only example of the Froelich scabbard we know of that has ever been sold at auction. Blade is 21-1/2″ long. Hilt, like other specimens, is ribbed and unmarked. Bayonet is missing spring and button. Scabbard is top sewn with brass throat and brass drag. Throat retains a teardrop-shaped frog button with its orig sewn frog. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate saber bayonet manufactured by Louis Froehlich of the Confederate States Armory in Kenansville, North Carolina in original scabbard. Long, 21½” blade with unstopped fuller extending from the ricasso to some 6” from the tip. The hilt is unmarked and is missing the stud lock and stud lock spring. The full length, original scabbard is top sewn with a brass throat and tip. The top throat has a teardrop-shaped stud to hold the waist belt frog, which is also present and still intact.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray with scattered staining and pitting. Blade is loose in hilt. Hilt has numerous dings and scratches and is missing spring and button. Scabbard body is solid but dry. Frog is solid, crazed, with some loss of black surface. Orig drag is resoldered/braised at seam and cleaned. Throat is untouched and exhibits nice patina. 4-31331 JS22 (4,000-6,000)

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1096

CONFEDERATE SABER BAYONET. This bayonet has many characteristics of the Louis Froelich bayonets and could possibly be one of their products. Blade on this example is larger than on most known Froelichs at over 22″ long and 1-1/4″ wide. This bayonet appears in as found, “attic” condition. Sword retains scabbard with brass throat and drag, which fits bayonet well. Scabbard body is back sewn and is of unknown manufacture. Throat is affixed with brass wire. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate saber bayonet resembling those made by Froehlich at the Confederate States Armory in Kenansville, North Carolina, but with a wider, finer manufactured blade than found on Froehlich’s products. The hilt is, however, almost identical to the casting of the hilt on Froehlich’s bayonets. The blade is 22¼” long, well finished, about 1¼” wide and with an unstopped fuller running 1” from the crossguard to about 6” from the tip. The scabbard is original to this bayonet and is in sound condition.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray/bright with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Hilt exhibits good patina. Scabbard tip and throat exhibit numerous scratches and dents. Scabbard body has one central cut, approx. 1/2″ long. Scabbard surface is crazed and mottled. JS23 4-31329 JS23 (2,500-3,500)

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1097

CONFEDERATE “MONSTER” SABER BAYONET. This rarely-encountered, massive, Confederate saber bayonet has a thick blade which is 20-1/2″ long and massive brass hilt. This bayonet is missing locking spring and still weighs over 2-1/2 lbs. It is unknown what gun this bayonet fit. There are probably more excavated specimens of this bayonet, due to the fact that it weighed so much. The soldier was very happy to throw it away in camp or after the battle and not have to further tote it. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate saber bayonet with massive, thick yataghan-shaped blade. The blade is 20½” long with a crude, unstopped fuller, which beings about 2½” from the crossguard and runs almost to the tip. The hilt is equally massive and noticeably shorter than found on other saber bayonets. The lug and the spring retainer which clamps the hilt to a bayonet lug are missing.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Point is rounded. Hilt exhibits numerous small scratches and dings with good patina. Locking spring is broken off, but still has retaining pin and base of spring. 4-31330 JS20 (3,000-4,000)

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1098

CONFEDERATE SABER BAYONET. This Confederate-made saber bayonet exhibits 18-3/4″ flat, unfullered blade which shows typical longitudinal faults seen in other Confederate blades. Hilt is marked with 5 small dots on spine. These 5 dots occur on other Confederate-made short swords and bayonets, but we are unaware of who made them. Locking pin and spring and missing. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate saber bayonet with flat, 18¾” blade. The blade of this bayonet, strangely yataghan in form, is unusual in that there is no fuller. The hilt is unmarked except for five punched dots on the back. The stud lock and the stud lock spring are missing. The tang of the blade is recessed about 1/8” from the end of the hilt at the pommel, as if an effort had been made to unseat the blade by driving against the tang where it exited the pommel.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray/brown with old sharpening. Hilt exhibits good patina. Blade tang is recessed about 1/8″ into pommel. Vice marks are visible on blade ricasso. 4-31327 JS19 (1,500-2,500)

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1099

CONFEDERATE “TREDEGAR” SOCKET BAYONET. This socket bayonet is well accepted as the most commonly encountered Confederate manufactured angular bayonet. For many years, this bayonet was accepted as a product of the Tredegar Iron Works, but there are competing beliefs that they were made at Raleigh, North Carolina, or at the CS Armory in Richmond, Virginia. Wherever they were made, they are unquestionably Confederate manufactured. Blade is triangular in shape with no flutes on any of the sides. Bayonet is iron with a braised steel tip. These bayonets are commonly excavated as rusted-out relics. Rarely are they offered in fine, non-excavated condition. This is indeed a fine example of this rarely seen Confederate edged weapon. These bayonets are found in several configurations and calibers. This bayonet is made to fit a 69 cal. Model 1842 musket or a Model 1816 conversion musket. This is the first Tredegar-style bayonet we have ever seen come to auction. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This socket bayonet is well accepted as the product of the Tredegar Iron Works, but there is a competing belief that they were made at the CS Armory at Richmond. Wherever they were made, they are of unquestionable Confederate manufacture. The blade is triangular in shape with no flutes on any of the sides. This bayonet has a socket to fit a .69 caliber musket.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Overall, surface is gray with scattered areas of staining and pitting. There is a cut in one of the angles of blade. There are several bends to blade and socket, but bayonet still fits on a 69 cal. musket quite snugly. 4-31326 JS18 (2,500-3,500)

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1100

CONFEDERATE IMPORTED ENFIELD CUTLASS BAYONET. SN 975. This is a rare example of a Confederate, serial numbered, blockade run, Model 1858 saber bayonet with massive 26-3/4″ blade. Like other English edged weapons of the period, basket is iron and grip is compressed leather held by iron pins. SN 975 is engraved on bolster. This number would have corresponded to a Model 1858 Blockade run English rifle with same SN. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Enfield cutlass bayonet with 27” blade and iron cup hilt. The pommel is engraved with the same size and style numbers found on the buttplate tang of Enfields imported to the Confederacy, in this case “975”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray with large areas of pitting, though proofs and maker’s mark are still visible. Grips are intact, though chipped and shrunk. 4-31314 JS6 (1,000-2,000)

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1101

CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUN ENFIELD SABER BAYONET. SN 650. This Enfield saber bayonet is complete with orig scabbard and frog. SN is cut longitudinally into pommel, as is typically found on other Confederate imported Enfield saber bayonets. SN would have been cut into buttplate of corresponding Enfield rifle that this bayonet would have fit. Bayonet is in beautiful condition. It must have been a trophy sold in prize court in the North that never made its way to Confederate service. You won’t find a nicer bayonet and scabbard. Though there is no serial number on scabbard, it appears to have always been with this bayonet, as condition and surfaces match perfectly. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Enfield saber bayonet with scabbard and white buff frog in excellent condition. All metal is uncleaned bright and all the leather is sound, including the leather grips of the bayonet itself. The hilt of the bayonet is engraved with the typical numbers placed on arms imported from England by the Confederacy, in this instance “650”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is bright with light areas of pitting. Hilt is very good, with scattered areas of rust staining on pommel and scabbard mounts. Compressed leather grips are very good. Leather scabbard body is very good. White, buff frog is very good, showing scattered soiling. 4-31318 JS28 (1,000-2,000)

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1102

ENFIELD SABER BAYONET. SN 574. This bayonet, like 4-31318, is probably a Blockade Run bayonet; however, this bayonet has a SN in the crossguard different than those that are unquestionably known to be Confederate. SN 574 is stamped in large numbers in crossguard, similar to those stamped into the wood of iron-mounted, Confederate imported rifles. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Saber bayonet for Enfield rifle. Crossguard marked with Confederate inventory/serial number “574”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray with scattered staining and pitting. Leather grips are worn, scuffed, scratched, and shrunk. Locking button is missing, but spring is retained. 4-31322 JS29 (300-500)

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1102A

CONFEDERATE “JOE BROWN” PIKE. The Governor of GA, Joseph Brown, in 1861, asked the mechanics of GA to produce him pikes such as this so the state could be defended by civilians against the predicted Yankee hordes invading. Such weapons were rarely used, but many were found in storage in places like the Augusta Arsenal at the end of the war. This is a neat variant by unknown maker. Pike overall is approx. 8-1/2′ long. Its spear point is 12″ long x 1-3/8″ wide. There is a “W” stamped on the ricasso of blade. A brass ferrule approx. 2″ holds blade. An unusual 7″ cast iron cap is found at base of staff. This is a nice example of a Confederate pike that was probably brought back north as a souvenir after the war. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate pike with full length shaft and ferrule at base. Brass ferrule at blade. Spear point blade with flat ricasso.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Wood staff is solid and straight with minor scrapes and gouges. Ferule and butt cap are complete, as are reinforcing straps, which are pitted. Blade is gray with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Maker’s mark “W” is crisp. 4-31403 JS113 (1,000-2,000)

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1103

ENFIELD SOCKET BAYONET. This bayonet has possible Confederate association from an unusual engraved number on socket. Most typically, numbers are engraved longitudinally. This has 3 sets of 2-digit numbers stamped vertically above each other. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Socket bayonet for Pattern 53 Enfield rifled musket with Confederate inventory/serial numbering. Numbers are engraved on socket in three lines “36 / 26 / 71”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Surfaces are gray/bright with scattered staining and pitting. 4-31323 JS30 (200-400)

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1104

COOK & BROTHER BAYONET ADAPTER. Seldom found, this Athens, Georgia made bayonet adapter was fitted on early Athens, Georgia made rifles for benefit of accepting saber bayonets of their manufacture. Adapter has a very distinctive, triangular lug which fitted into the cutout on the Athens made saber bayonets. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Cook & Brother saber bayonet adapters were utilized with the rifles produced at Athens, Georgia. They have a triangular lug which fitted into the triangular cutout in the hilt of the saber bayonet” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Adapter has been cleaned, showing numerous casting flaws. Retaining screw appears orig. 4-31295 JS70 (500-1,000)

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1105

COOK & BROTHER BAYONET ADAPTER. Athens-made bayonet adapter with SN 66 stamped on flat, triangular lug. Adapter appears larger and heavier than most encountered. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Brass bayonet adapter with triangular stud. Large size for M1841-type rifle.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Surfaces are good and smooth with good patination. SN markings are crisp. Orig finishing marks are visible. Retaining screw appears orig. 4-31296 JS69 (500-1,000)

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1106

BOYLE, GAMBLE & MCFEE BAYONET ADAPTER. This adapter is SN 59 on lug and is maker marked “BG&M / Richmond VA / Patent Sept. 2, 1861”. Adapter is excavated. It still retains dirt from some unknown battlefield or campsite. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Boyle, Gamble & McFee bayonet adapter made of brass and well marked, “B. G. & M / Richmond Va / Pat Sept 2, 186” on the body and number “59” on the lug. These adapters were designed to provide a lug for the barrel of rifles manufactured without an integral bayonet lug affixed to the barrel.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: As excavated with ground action and dug patina. Missing set screw. Markings are discernible. Still retains proper curvature for gun. 4-31334 JS70 (500-1,000)

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1107

HISTORIC FIRST MODEL LeMAT REVOLVER CAPTURED FROM THE CONFEDERATE IRONCLAD “ATLANTA” SERIAL NUMBER 7. SN 7. One of the most historic and important Confederate associated revolvers to come to market in recent memory is this rare First Model LeMat revolver serial number 7. LeMat revolvers were invented by Dr. Jean Alexandre Francois LeMat of New Orleans. The LeMat revolver is a .42 caliber cap & ball black powder revolver which featured a rather unusual secondary 16 gauge smoothbore barrel capable of firing grapeshot. The First Model LeMats were produced in Paris in 1862 and featured a spurred trigger guard, part round, part oct bbl and a swivel lanyard ring attached to the butt cap. All iron, these revolvers had checkered walnut two-piece grips. This is also the lowest SN known on any LeMat. This LeMat is, properly, marked on the top barrel flat “Col. LeMat’s Patent” (pictured in Adams’ book but misidentified as serial number 15). On the right side of the grip is a small silver plate, affixed with two pins and engraved “ATLANTA.” Documentary evidence for the inventory of this Confederate ironclad ship lists three LeMat revolvers. Only two other documented LeMat revolvers exist with Confederate Naval usage. CSS Atlanta , an 1006-ton ironclad ram, was originally built in Scotland in 1861 as the merchant steamship Fingal . In November 1861 she ran the blockade into Savannah, Georgia, with a large cargo of weapons and military supplies. After Union forces closed the exits from Savannah, preventing her further use as a blockade runner, Fingal was converted to an casemate ironclad and renamed Atlanta . She made her first appearance as a Confederate warship in mid-1862. Atlanta made two efforts to attack Federal warships blockading the coast and rivers leading to Savannah. The first, in early 1863, was thwarted by obstructions blocking the route to the sea. In June 1863 Atlanta made her second attempt, targeting blockaders in Wassau Sound. There, on the 17th, she encountered the U.S. Navy monitors Nahant and Weehawken . In a brief battle, Atlanta went aground and was overwhelmed by Weehawken ‘s superior firepower, forcing her to surrender. The captured ironclad was taken into the Union Navy as USS Atlanta , commissioning for service in February 1864. She was stationed on the James River, Virginia, to support the operations of the army under General Grant. On 21 May 1864, she fired on Confederate cavalry that were attacking Fort Powhatan. A year later, with the Civil War over, Atlanta went north and decommissioned at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in June 1865. After several years “in ordinary”, she was sold in May 1869. Reportedly, she subsequently became the Haitian warship Triumph and disappeared at sea off Cape Hatteras in December 1869. This is the lowest serial number known among all LeMats, is among the best condition and is among the most historic. What more could you want in a great LeMat? Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “First Model LeMat revolver captured with the surrender of the Confederate ironclad ”Atlanta.“ This revolver, serial number 7, is the lowest serial number revolver with an established Confederate usage. (The revolver is misidentified in ”The Confederate LeMat Revolver“ by Doug Adams as being serial number 15.) Inlet into the right grip is a small silver plate engraved “Atlanta”. The inventory of the ironclad ”Atlanta“ included three LeMat revolvers. The revolver is in superb condition, well marked with the serial number 7 on virtually every component. It is one of only three with known association with the effort of the Confederacy to create a naval force, the other two being serial number 183, captured aboard the Confederate Commerce raider ”Florida“ (also marked on the left side of the frame “Captured in the Rebel Steamer Florida”) and serial number 946, carried by J. N. Maffitt, the Captain of the ”Florida“. The ”Atlanta“ was a refitted iron steamship of English origin which had run the blockade in November 1861. Taken by the Confederate government and rename, the ”Atlanta,“ it was then altered and strengthened for service as an ironclad man-of-war. Leaving the Wilmington River and entering Wassau Sound for the purpose of raising the blockade, at that point it was confronted by the Union monitor,” Weehawken“ under Capt. John Rodgers. The action, as described in James Russell Soley’s book published in 1883, ”The Blockade and the Cruisers,“ was brief: “With the deliberateness which characterized him in the most trying moments, Rodgers delivered the fire of his two heavy guns, the XI-inch and the XV-inch. He fired five shots, of which four hit the ”Atlanta. “The first, a XV-inch cored shot, struck the inclined side of the vessel, in the line of the ports; and though fired at an angle of fifty degrees with her keel, penetrated the armor and, ripping out the wooden backing, the two layers of which were the brittle Georgia pine, covered the deck with splinters. From the effects of this shot, forty or more men were prostrated, several of whom received ugly wounds from the fragments of wood and iron. The second shot, from the XI-inch gun, struck the edge of the overhand, and started the plating. The third carried off the roof of the pilot-house, wounded the two pilots, and stunned the men at the wheel. The fourth shattered a port-shutter, driving the fragments in through the port.” After its capture, it was found that the ship had actually run aground and was apparently unable to maneuver. With the revolver is a copy of a photograph taken of the ”Atlanta “after its capture and a copy of a line drawing of the ship under steam. The octagon to round barrel is marked, correctly, only “Col. LeMat’s Patent”.” CONDITION: Fine, this revolver is well marked, retains a nice dark patina overall with very little pitting. Showing light wear, the LeMat functions mechanically well and is correctly marked with the serial number 7 throughout. A marvelous opportunity to obtain a rare First Model LeMat with long established Confederate Naval usage and capture. One of the finest examples known with a rich history. 4-31368 CW2 (50,000-100,000)

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1108

RARE AND DESIRABLE CONFEDERATE FIRST-SECOND MODEL TRANSITIONAL LeMAT REVOLVER. SN 637. One of the most desirable and important Confederate revolvers on the market today is this rare Transitional First-Second Model LeMat revolver serial number 637, all matching. LeMat revolvers were invented by Dr. Jean Alexandre Francois LeMat of New Orleans. The LeMat revolver is a .42 caliber cap & ball black powder revolver which featured an unusual secondary 16 gauge smoothbore barrel capable of firing grapeshot. This First Model LeMat was produced in Paris France in 1862-3 and features a spurred trigger guard, part round, part octagon barrel and a swivel lanyard ring (missing) attached to the butt cap. All iron, these revolvers had checkered walnut two-piece grips. This distinctive revolver exhibits most of the major features of the Second Model LeMat, however, the First Model style spurred trigger guard has been retained as has the lever release for barrel immediately below the shotgun barrel and the lanyard ring (missing) is attached with a pin instead of being cast integral with the butt cap. On the right face of the barrel is the mark “LM” surmounted by a 5-pointed star. The early 2nd model barrel marking reads “COL. LeMat BTE. s.g.d.g. PARIS” appears across the top barrel flat in fancy script. Here we have a rare transitional model showing the improvements made to the Second Model LeMat revolver while retaining some of the features of the First Model. Very few of these Transitional Models are known and this revolver represents a rare opportunity to obtain one. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “LeMat revolver serial number 637 is an example of what has been referred to as “transitional” between the first model and the second model. The trigger guard with finger grip extension is typical of the first model, as is the swivel lanyard ring in the butt cap (missing on this piece), but the loading lever is now moved from the right side of the frame to the left side, characteristic of the second model of this revolver. The serial number appears on essentially every part. The octagon barrel is marked (in small, Old English lettering) “Col. LeMat Bte S.G.D.G. Paris” in an engraved panel.” CONDITION: Very Good. No original finish remains but all iron parts have evenly aged to a mellow dark brown patina. The grips show light wear consistent with handgun. Never cleaned and, with no visible pitting, this LeMat is in very attractive condition. 4-31369 CW7 (20,000-22,000)

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1109

RARE CONFEDERATE LeMAT SECOND MODEL REVOLVER. SN 1635. One of the nicest 2nd Model LeMat revolvers recently seen on the market. This example has the earliest 2nd model barrel marking dating it to the late war period 1864-65. The LeMat revolver is a .42 caliber cap & ball black powder revolver which featured a rather unusual secondary 16 gauge smoothbore barrel capable of firing grapeshot. This 2nd model was manufactured in France and has the distinctive round trigger guard without spur. Full octagonal barrel with loading lever on the left side and a lanyard ring cast in general with the steel butt cap. Serial number 1635 all matching. On the right face of the barrel is the mark “LM” surmounted by a 5-pointed star. The early 2nd model barrel marking reads “COL. LeMat BTE. s.g.d.g. PARIS” appears across the top barrel flat in fancy script. The revolver is all iron with a two piece checkered walnut grip. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This LeMat revolver, serial number 1635, is typical in all regards of the second model, including elimination of the finger grip on the trigger guard and the swivel ring in the buttcap and location of the loading lever on the left side of the revolver. The cylinder still contains considerable of its blued finish and the barrel also shows traces of blued finish as well. The serial number appears on essentially every part. It is missing the pin securing the barrel housing to the frame and one nipple is broken off in the cylinder. The barrel is marked in large, Old English letters, “Col. LeMat Bte S.G.D.G. Paris” in an engraved panel.” This novel revolver was first patented in America in 1856 and later in several European countries. They were popular with a number of high ranking Confederate officers and a substantial number of them were purchased by the Confederate States of America under a direct government contract. CONDITION: Fine. This example retains much of its original factory blued finish in protected areas. The cylinder retains about 90% of its finish and the barrel about 50% being worn at the muzzle and near the breech. The iron frame and remaining parts, with minor traces of blue, have turned a pleasing plum brown color. The grips show very little wear and the revolver is mechanically fine. One screw, on the right side of the frame has minor damage to the slot. The frame release pin is missing and one nipple is broken. A marvelous opportunity to obtain one of the most desirable Confederate handguns in truly nice condition. 4-31370 CW6 (20,000-24,000)

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1110

SCARCE AND RARE CONFEDERATE NAVY CONTRACT LeMAT AND GIRARD’S PATENT LONDON TWO BARREL REVOLVER. SN 8074. A fine example of this London, England Made LeMat Revolver manufactured about 1865. This was the last percussion revolver manufactured under LeMat’s patent. Caliber 42 rifled barrel & 16 gauge smoothbore. Serial Number 8074. In the book on LeMats by Doug Adams, Adams states the London LeMats serial numbered 8000-9000 were a Confederate Navy contract made by Tipping & Co. in England. Late London made LeMat with 6-9/16″ octagon barrel with block letter address on top flat “LEMAT & GIRARD’S PATENT LONDON”. It has the tall LeMat front sight & has the serial number on right flat in front of cylinder. Serial number also appears on right front side of frame and barrel near the breech. No serial number was observed on smoothbore bbl but it does have two Birmingham proofs & number “18” which probably refers to bore diameter. It has left side rammer that operates in a channel between barrel and rear barrel boss and the serial number on inside of rammer handle. It has single pin barrel assembly lock with knurled head. It has a center mounted articulated hammer nose & 9-shot cylinder that pivots around smoothbore barrel and has serial number with Birmingham proofs around perimeter. It has integral solid butt cap & lanyard loop without ring. This revolver represents one of the important models in the string of variations produced in this revolver. With the documentation in Adams’ book, it is highly likely that this revolver was manufactured on contract for the Confederacy. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This is the final version of the percussion LeMat revolvers, made by C. Girard & Co. under contract with the Confederate Navy Department. IT is serial numbered 8074 on all the component parts and the barrel marked in block letters “LEMAT & GIRARD’S PATENT LONDON”. It still has considerable blue/brown finish overall except for the hammer, which was apparently finish bright.” CONDITION: Fine. This LeMat retains much of its original blued finish, about 50% on the barrel and 80% on the cylinder. The remaining metal parts have a nice dark, uncleaned brown patina. The grips show appropriate wear. 4-31371 CW8 (19,000-23,000)

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1111

FIRST MODEL GRISWOLD REVOLVER. SN 810. Cal. 36. Standard 1st Model Griswold. 1st Models externally are differentiated from later guns due to the round barrel housing. SN appears on bbl housing, cyl, frame, trigger guard, and backstrap. Secondary number “10” appears on wedge, loading arm, and inside stocks in red pencil. The cryptic “DD” is stamped on backstrap, trigger guard, and frame internally and is also visible on back of cyl. A secondary number “26” is stamped on top of base pin. This is the only Griswold I have ever encountered with a number stamped there, and base pin is absolutely correct for this gun, showing typical Griswold features, such as the way the slot is made and the way the grease grooves are cut. This gun’s frame also has unusual characteristics of six half moon-shaped, raised areas cast into raised platform ring in back of frame. Their purpose is unknown, and this is the only gun we have noted with this feature. Early 1st Model Griswolds are scarce; maybe this feature occurs on others. This is a well-known gun, formerly in the collection of Henry Stewart, who purchased this gun from a barber in Lexington, VA, while he was attending the Virginia Military Academy. It is pictured on p. 28 of Robert Abel’s book, published in 1950, Early American Firearms. This is one of the earliest published Confederate handguns, and it presents very nicely, showing the characteristic twisted iron in the cyl and bbl, so typical of Griswold revolvers. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Manufactured by the partnership of Samuel Griswold and Arvin N. Gunnison in Griswoldville, Georgia, this revolver is typical of the earliest productions. The primary difference between the early and later production revolvers is in the shape of the barrel housing which is round in earlier production and octagonal in the later production. The change general occurs about serial number 1500 and this revolver, serial number 810, is with the round barrel housing characteristic of the earlier production. Well marked throughout, the serial number appears on the frame of this revolver, the cylinder, triggerguard, barrel, and grips. Not only is this revolver completely original, it is well documented. Formerly the property of Henry M. Stewart, it is pictured as the bottom revolver on p. 38 of Robert Abels’ book, published in 1950, ”Early American Firearms. “According to Mr. Stewart, he purchased the revolver from a barber in Lexington, Virginia, for $1.50 when he was a student at the Virginia Military Academy.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Bbl and cyl have been overcleaned, revealing the very distinctive twist, characteristic of this manufacturer, especially in cyl. Front site is worn down. Brass surfaces cleaned. Stocks retain traces of orig varnish. Small shim has been welded to bbl housing where it attaches to frame. Markings are all clear and well struck with exception of weak SN on bbl housing, but it is still discernible. 4-31347 JS108 (15,000-20,000)

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1112

RARE CONFEDERATE GRISWOLD BRASS FRAME REVOLVER. SN 1531. This is one of the earliest SN in the Griswold 2nd Model range with 1510 & 1516 being the two earliest SNs. This Griswold & Gunnison revolver produced in Griswoldville, Georgia, serial number 1531 is a brass framed copy of the .36 caliber Colt Model 1851 Navy revolver with a 6-shot round cylinder, dragoon style barrel, octagon to round, with one-piece walnut grips and a brass frame, trigger guard and back strap. The serial is stamped in large numbers beneath the frame, on the bottom of the barrel lug, and on the cylinder. A single digit serial number “1” appears on the on the loading lever and trigger guard. Some 3,600 to 3,700 revolvers were produced by Griswold and Gunnison from about July 1862 until the destruction of the factory in the November 22, 1864 during the Battle of Griswold Station. There is speculation that either production continued elsewhere or parts were hidden prior to the battle as deliveries continued until April 1865. Samuel Griswold established a number of manufacturing enterprises in an area nine miles south of Macon, Georgia on the Georgia Central Railroad. This site became known as Griswoldville. In 1861, he shifted the cotton gin factory to the production of pikes for the Confederate Government. In mid 1862, he was joined by Arvin Gunnison, who had begun revolver production in New Orleans but had escaped just before that city’s capture. The Griswold brass frame copies of the Colt Model 1851 Navy were made in two patterns: One with a round top barrel housing and the second with an octagonal top barrel housing. This example is the so called “Second Model” with a 7.5 inch barrel, octagonal breech and brass frame. This is a fine example and represents a wonderful opportunity to obtain one of the most recognizable and desirable Confederate manufactured brass frame revolvers. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Typical of the later production of Samuel Griswold’s and Arvin N. Gunnison’s manufacture of pistols at Griswoldville, Georgia, this revolver has an octagonal barrel housing as opposed to the rounded housing which appeared on the earlier production pieces. Serial number 1531 places this revolver at about the transitional point in production. Not only is this revolver all completely original, it is well documented as once part of the collection of Robert Sutherland as an example of the Confederate copy of the Colt and is shown on p. 144 of the book devoted to his collection, ”The Book of Colt Firearms“ by Sutherland & Wilson.” CONDITION: Good. The revolver has been lightly cleaned a long time ago leaving small areas of pitting on iron parts. The brass frame and furniture have obtained a nice mellow patina. Some tool marks and dents appear on the right side of the barrel lug. The grips are very good with a shallow chip out of the left side at the toe. 4-31348 CW9 (20,000-24,000)

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1113

SPILLER & BURR REVOLVER. SN 345. Cal. 36. Spiller & Burr standard model revolver with “CS” stamped on left side of frame. SN occurs on bbl, frame, trigger guard, and inside stocks. Interesting is that inside the left stock is nicely scratched the name “John H. Fowler, 1888”. The right stock is similarly inscribed “J. H. F. / Elkton / MD”. I don’t know who Mr. Fowler is, but it would be interesting to know his story. Inside of frame is also marked with a cryptic letter “M”. This is an attractive specimen of the popular Atlanta & Macon made, brass-framed, Confederate revolver. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “The partnership of Edward N. Spiller and David J. Burr produced their first revolvers at an Atlanta factory and then at Macon, Georgia. Total production was approximately 1,250 revolvers. This revolver is serial number 345 and is stamped “CS” on the left side of the brass frame. The serial number appears under the barrel, at the top of the grip frame, inside the trigger guard, and inside the wood grips. The inside of the left grip is inscribed “John H. Fowler 1888” and the inside of the right grip is similarly inscribed “JHF / Elkton Md”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Bbl is brown with scattered pitting. Hammer & cyl are also brown with scattered pitting. Loading assembly appears replaced and is smooth and brown. Mainspring appears replaced. Right stock has about a 1″ x 1/2″ chip repaired and a much smaller chip opposite it. 4-31352 JS107 (12,000-15,000)

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1114

CONFEDERATE LEECH AND RIGDON REVOLVER INSCRIBED BY A MISSISSIPPI CAVALRYMAN. SN 346. A fine early serial numbered specimen of this rare Confederate revolver made by Thomas Leech and Charles H. Rigdon in Columbus, Mississippi. Guns with small “Leech & Rigdon” dies such as this under the mid 400 SN range are thought to be made in Columbus, MS before factory was later moved to Georgia. The revolver, serial number 346, generally follows the pattern of the Colt Model 1851 Navy being .36 caliber with a 6-shot cylinder, 7 ½” part round, part octagon barrel marked on the top flat of the barrel’s octagonal breech “LEECH & RIGD– .” The letters “C.S.A.” are not present either due to a variation in the barrel marking on an incomplete stamp (which is likely because the last two letters of the firm’s name are not visible). Walnut one-piece grips with brass trigger guard and back strap. All marked parts match. In place of the more common 4-dot cross mark on the brass trigger guard, the capital letter “N” is stamped on the left side of the trigger guard. The serial number on the cylinder is unusual and interesting being stamped “346” with an additional “3” above the “4” and an additional “4” below the “3” almost as if the worker could not decide whether to stamp the serial vertically or horizontally. Before the Civil War, Thomas Leech was a cotton trader and Charles H. Rigdon was a scale maker. Together their association would produce for the Confederacy one of the best revolvers of the time that could easily compete with the 1851 Colt Navy, of which it was a direct copy. Thomas Leech is also known to have had other business interests, for some Derringer pistols have survived that are marked “made for Thomas Leech & Co, Memphis, Tenn”. He had also founded the Memphis Novelty Works in 1861, a company specialized in the manufacture of cutlery, in particular, a number of Confederate swords. By May, 1862 the company was known as Leech & Rigdon, and was established at Columbus, Mississippi. The partners secured a contract with the Confederate States Government for the manufacture of 1,500 revolvers of the Colt Navy 1851 type. The Leech & Rigdon Company moved from Columbus in December of 1862 due to the impending Union threat. The manufactory was moved to Greensboro, Georgia; and all efforts were concentrated on the manufacture of revolvers. The partnership dissolved for unknown reasons in December, 1863, with a total about 1,500 revolvers produced. Charles Rigdon bought the company’s machinery and tools, kept the workers and reinstalled the plant at Augusta, Georgia, where he was joined by Jesse A. Ansley and two other partners, with whom he formed the Rigdon, Ansley & Co. The new company would continue to produce revolvers of the same type for the Confederate army. The original Leech & Rigdon’s contract for 1,500 pistols seems to have been achieved, and from serial # 1500 on, the company started the production of guns equipped with a 12 slot cylinders, which are today known as the Rigdon Ansley revolvers. On the back strap appears the name “Thomas Ruddick” which has been hand scratched into the brass. Initial research shows a Thomas Ruddick in the 28th Mississippi Cavalry Regiment, C.S.A. an important Western theater cavalry regiment, a quick glimpse of their history shows that this regiment was organized early in 1862, for three years. The original officers — Starke, Ferguson and Jones — were commissioned February 24, 1862; the regiment was reported May 14 in at Camp at Jackson, where it was organized. Colonel Starke was a man of prominence and had organized a cavalry company in his home county, Bolivar, early in 1861. The first active service of the regiment was occasioned by the naval attack on Vicksburg, beginning in May, 1862. Five companies of Starke’s Cavalry reinforced Gen. M. L. Smith, at Vicksburg, and were posted to watch the flanks along the Yazoo and below Warrenton on the Mississippi. Later the regiment was at Camp Burrus, in Bolivar County. They operated along the river and in the swamp country, where many contracted fever. At Vicksburg in December, 1862, part of the regiment took part in the Chickasaw Bayou campaign, while the remainder of the regiment, according to Federal reports, was engaged with Steele’s expedition from Helena, in the vicinity of Panola, in the same month. In January, 1863, the regiment was assigned Gen. W. T. Martin’s Division of cavalry under General Van Dorn, about 7,500 strong, which fought in the campaign in Middle Tennessee early in 1863, supporting General Bragg’s army. They were present at the battle of Thompson’s Station, March 5, but held in reserve; were in the skirmish with Minty’s Cavalry at Thompson’s Station, March 9, and actively engaged in the attack on Franklin, April 10. Van Dorn’s campaign, during which he lost his life in a private affair, left Mississippi open to Grierson’s raid and Grant’s advance from Bruinsburg to Jackson and the Yazoo River. The Twenty-eighth, leaving Tennessee May 17, reached Mechanicsburg June 7, a march of 400 miles where they attacked a detachment of the Fourth Iowa Cavalry, under Major Parkell. July 4 the regiment moved from Mechanicsburg to Birdsong’s Ferry, and as Johnston’s army fell back to Jackson, they skirmished with Sherman’s advance July 7, and fell back covering Johnston’s retreat, skirmishing frequently and resisting a charge of cavalry at Clinton. Just before the evacuation of Jackson, July 16, they went to the Federal rear, and recrossed Pearl River after the retreat of Johnston to Morton. After the evacuation of Jackson by Sherman, the regiment was at or near Clinton until moved to Brownsville in September. On October 10th detachments from the 28th were attacked, near Port Gibson by a force of Illinois and Wisconsin Cavalry, whose commanding officer reported 11 of the two regiments killed. October 14th McPherson’s expedition set out from Vicksburg intending to go to Canton but on account of the effective resistance made, proceeded no further than Clinton. There were engagements at Brownsville, October 15; on the Canton road near Brownsville, October 15-16; near the Clinton and Vernon cross roads, October 16; at Bogue Chitto Creek, and near Livingston, October 17; and near Clinton, October 18, in which all or parts of the regiment were engaged. After this the regiment was on guard between the Pearl and Big Black Rivers to the close of the year. December 25, 1863, At the outset of Sherman’s raid to Meridian, they met the advance of Hurlbut’s column giving battle there February 4th. This all was preparatory to the campaign against Atlanta. The regiment moved into Alabama in the spring of 1864. May 5, 1864, the brigade moved from Carthage to Montevallo, Ala.; 14th, arrived at Rome, Ga.; 17th, reached Adairsville and engaged the enemy with considerable loss in killed and wounded; May 20, fought at Cassville, crossed the Etowah, and moved to Dallas, skirmishing. May 28 the brigade was dismounted temporarily and put in the trenches on the extreme south of the line extending from northeast of New Hope Church, southwest of Dallas. After this they skirmished continually as the armies moved to the Marietta line, skirmished on that line and in the Federal rear near Powder Springs, picketed the Chattahoochee River, moved to West Point July 17 to meet Rousseau’s expedition, took part in the battle of July 28 near Atlanta, skirmished at Herring’s Mill July 30, was in the battle of August 6, and fought near Jonesboro, August 30. In battle at Lawrenceburg, Campbellsville, Columbia, Spring Hill and Franklin; in November, they followed the Federal army to Nashville, thence moved to Murfreesboro, and was particularly distinguished in battle there December 7. In the rear guard of the army during the retreat from Nashville they fought at Columbia, Warfield’s, Richland Creek, Pulaski, King’s Hill and Sugar Creek, December 22-26. Their commander, Colonel Starke was promoted to Brigadier-General November 4, 1864, and the regiment is assigned to his brigade in General Chalmers’ orders of February, 1865. When Gen. J. H. Wilson started on his raid through Alabama and Georgia in March and April, 1865, the brigade moved from Pickensville, Ala., to meet him, and after three days and nights of marching and countermarching arrived near Selma during the assault upon the fortifications there, April 2, but were cut off from the town by the Federal troops and were unable to render any assistance. When Selma was taken they were compelled to retire in the night, thirty miles, across the Cahawba River, after which they moved to Livingston and went into camp. There the last muster rolls were made, up to April 31, 1865. The capitulation by Gen. Richard Taylor occurred May 4, 1865. The cavalry commands under General Forrest were surrendered at Gainesville, Ala., May 22, 1865. With a long and distinguished history, the relationship between this revolver and this famous cavalry unit is remarkable. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Not unlike many seemingly strange partnerships in the arms trade, the pairing of Leech & Rigdon joined a scale manufacturer, Charles H. Rigdon, with a cotton grower, Thomas Leech. Apparently their first arms were produced in Greensboro, Georgia. This revolver, serial number 346, has the typical small numbers and barrel marking “Leech & Rigdon” of the company’s early production. Well marked and completely original, that serial number appears on the cylinder, frame, loading lever, loading lever catch, grips, and backstrap. The backstrap is scratch engraved with the name “Thomas Ruddick”. Ruddick was mustered into service on March 9, 1862, at age 27. He joined Capt. George T. Blackburn’s Company of Cavalry, Starke’s Regiment, Mississippi Volunteers (subsequently becoming Company D of the 28th Regiment of the Mississippi Cavalry). He was apparently taken prisoner at Lake Village, Arkansas, on May 14, 1864. Provenance: Catalog of L. C. “Red” Jackson, No. 9, of September 1960.” PROVENANCE: Catalog of L.C. “Red” Jackson #9 of September 1960. CONDITION: Good. All iron parts have a nice dark grey patina which has never been severely cleaned. There is light pitting at the barrel’s muzzle and near the breach. The revolver’s mechanics are fine. Walnut grips show light wear consistent with the metal surfaces of the gun. All serial numbers match. 4-31350 CW11 (25,000-35,000)

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1115
Revised: 10/19/2007

(Correction) In reference to Mr.Michel’s notes it states “Kings of Rythias Hall”. This should actually read “Knights of Pythias Hall”.

FINE CONFEDERATE LEECH AND RIGDON REVOLVER. SN 634. A fine specimen of this rare Confederate revolver made by Thomas Leech and Charles H. Rigdon in Greensboro, GA. The revolver, serial number 634, generally follows the patter of the Colt Model 1851 Navy being .36 caliber with a 6-shot cylinder, 7 ½” part round, part octagon barrel marked on the top flat “LEECH & RIGDON CSA.” Walnut one-piece grips with brass trigger guard and back strap. All marked parts match. The distinctive 4-dot cross appears on the brass trigger guard. On the left side of the barrel breech stamped in large letters is “LAFAYETTE LODGE/25/KP” leading me to believe that this revolver was once the part of a collection of war trophies on display at the Knights of Pythias (KP) lodge. Interestingly, the name was misspelled and a “Y” added to left flat of the barrel breech to correct “LAFAETTE.” This stamping was accomplished at some early period following the Civil War. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This Leech & Rigdon revolver is marked on the larger stamping “Leech & Rigdon CSA” on the barrel housing and serial number “634” on the cylinder, frame, loading lever, loading lever latch, grips, and backstrap. Apparently, this revolver was once on display at a Kings of Rythias hall, as the left side of the barrel housing is well marked “Lafayette Lodge / 25 / KP”.” CONDITION: The revolver is quite attractive having an even plumb brown patina on all of the iron parts and a nice mellow color to the brass. Typical casting flaws are noted here and there as is moderate wear. There is a chip missing from the toe of the left grip. The revolver functions mechanically well. A nice opportunity to own a rare Confederate revolver in attractive condition. Some additional research may reveal where the location of the “LaFayette Lodge” was located. 4-31349 CW1 (25,000-35,000)

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1116

RARE CONFEDERATE RIGDON, ANSLEY & COMPANY 12 STOP REVOLVER SN 1762. This Confederate revolver, serial number 1762, was produced by Rigdon, Ansley & Company of Augusta GA and is, generally, patterned after the Colt Model 1851 Navy. About 1,000 of these were made in .36 caliber with a 6-shot round cylinder having 12 stops on the exterior. All iron with brass trigger guard and back strap with one-piece walnut grips. A marvelous opportunity to obtain a classic and rare Confederate revolver manufactured in Augusta, GA during the American Civil War. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “The Rigdon, Ansley & Co. revolvers were basically the same revolvers as those produced by Leech & Rigdon. The most recognizable difference is the adoption of a 12-stop cylinder. When the Leech & Rigdon partnership dissolved, Charles Rigdon moved the plant and formed a new company with Jesse A. Ansley, Andrew J. Smith, and Charles R. Keen under the new name Rigdon, Ansley & Co. Rigdon, Ansley & Co. revolvers begin at about serial number 1500 with the highest serial number known in the 2400 range. This revolver is serial number 1762 and in keeping with other known revolvers in that range is marked on the barrel housing only, “CSA”.” CONDITION: Fine, all iron parts have aged to a pleasing dark brown patina, never cleaned and with only moderate wear. Two cylinder nipples are broken. Brass parts have an equally pleasing patina and the revolver functions mechanically well, however, its ability to stay at full cock is touchy. 4-31351 CW3 (25,000-35,000)

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1117

“GARRETT” BRASS FRAME PERCUSSION PISTOL SN 69. Cal. 54. We are calling this pistol a Garrett because most early literature describes it as such, but we do not know definitively who made these guns. They are very well made. Most Confederate handgun collectors try to find one of these scarce pistols. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states the Garrett controversy quite well as follows: “This pistol has long been associated as a Confederate assemblage, but at the same time there have been questions as to its origins and use. Bennet and Simmons in their book, Confederate Handguns, devoted an entire chapter to these pistols, suggesting they were made up by J&F Garrett & Co. of Greensboro, North Carolina, the name by which they have since been known. Garrett was the manufacturer of the Tarpley’s patent breechloading carbine. The association was primarily the result of an effort to identify the pistols referred to in DeBow’s Review, a Southern bimonthly publication, as being among the items being manufactured in 1862 by the Garretts. In all the years that have passed, no one seems to have identified the source of these pistols and in particular how an apparently substantial supply of Model 1842 pistol barrels, ramrods, hammers, and trigger guards came to be in need of assembly with a brass frame and new grips”. Recent research has shown that there were quantities of surplus 1842 pistol parts. The failure rate at Aston & Johnson was quite high. We now believe Palmetto Armory contract 1842 pistols are made from Aston-Johnson condemned 1842 parts, so there is no doubt a quantity of these parts was available. Regardless of who made these pistols, they are scarce, and this is a very presentable example. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are cleaned overall. “JH” proof in bbl is crisp. Metal surfaces are gray, smooth, with scattered pitting. Brass surfaces are cleaned with numerous small scratches and dings. The removable brass panel fits poorly at trigger guard. Stocks retain much of their orig varnish, though scratched and chipped. Hammer screw appears replaced, as does ramrod assembly. 4-31353 JS109 (3,000-5,000)

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1118

LEFAUCHEAUX ARMY PISTOL, HOLSTER, CAP BOX, & BELT a most interesting, orig rig in excellent condition. 12mm LeFaucheaux pistol, SN 35315, exhibits 20-30% bright blue finish. Holster, cap box, and belt all in excellent condition. Leather surfaces are very good. Cap box, though it has a brass finial and two sewn belt loops, is not necessarily of U.S. manufacture. It could be Confederate-made. Confederates did copy Union accouterments, and the sewing style could be CS. Cloth belt is most unusual. We have never encountered this double-roller buckle belt before. Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes this rig as follows: “This complete Confederate cavalryman’s outfit includes is LeFaucheaux pinfire revolver, original heavy leather holster, cap box, and red stripe double roller buckle cloth belt. The fit of the revolver to the holster is evident down to the unique impression in the holster of the extractor rod. The cap box, apparently adapted to hold the pinfire cartridges, is of matching hand sewn leather as are the two straps with roller buckles on the belt. The pistol itself shows wear at the muzzle but is in overall very good condition, all complete and serial numbered 35315.” CONDITION: Pistol overall is brown/blue with areas of scattered staining. Stocks retain traces of orig varnish with numerous dents and scratches. Markings are all crisp. Mechanically, gun is fine. Holster is overall complete, intact, supple and surfaces have some scuffed areas to high spots. Cap box is also very good, with good surfaces. Cap box lacks lamb’s wool which could have been purposely removed to hold cartridges. Belt overall is very good, with minor insect damage and a few scattered tears and reductions. One leather end is cracked. Leather tongues are solid but crazed. 4-31375 JS59 (1,000-2,000)

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1119

KERR REVOLVER. SN 1493. Cal. approx 44. Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes this gun as follows: “This 5-cylinder revolver is the product of the London Armory Company, with whom Caleb Huse made one of his first contacts in his effort to procure arms for the Confederacy. In addition to stands of longarms, London Armory furnished the Kerr revolvers in significant numbers. Those with Confederate association, as this one, are struck with the ‘JS’/anchor mark, the same as those that appear on the longarms. This mark on the pistol is on the underside of the checkered grips below the trigger guard plate. The lockplate of this revolver is engraved ‘London Armory’ and the frame is marked with the serial number ‘Kerr’s Patent 1493’. This is a particularly fine specimen with considerable amounts remaining of the original fine blue finish”. This is a very fine example of the Blockade Run “JS”/anchor marked Kerr revolver. It is also a very low SN, associated with Confederate Kerrs. CONDITION: Bbl and cyl retain 60-80% orig bright blue finish with areas of scattered staining. Face of cyl has several cuts and dings. Frame and lock retain traces of orig finish. Stocks show little wear, retaining orig varnish. “JS”/anchor markings are crisp, though partially obscured by checkering. 4-31372 JS110 (7,000-10,000)

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1120

TRANTER ARMY REVOLVER. Cal. approx. 44. Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes the gun as follows: “The five chambered Tranter revolver is one of several imported English pistols which found favor in the hands of Confederate soldiers. Perhaps the most famous of these revolvers is the one apparently presented to General J. B. MacGruder. This revolver retains traces of its original finish underneath the barrel. It is marked atop the frame ‘Deane & Son / 30 King Willism Stt / London Bridge”. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are gray with scattered areas of pitting and traces of finish. Stocks exhibit traces of orig varnish and numerous small nicks, scratches, and gouges. 4-31373 JS111 (1,500-2,500)

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1121

WEBLEY “WEDGE-FRAME” ARMY REVOLVER. SN 2361. Cal. approx. 44. Mr. Michel describes this scarce Confederate import as follows: “The five chambered ‘Wedge-Frame’ Webley double action percussion revolver was, although generally unrecognized as such, a revolver that was imported in some number to the Confederacy. Less well recognized as an imported revolver in the hands of Confederate troops than the more well-known Kerr or Tranter revolvers, these are no less deserving of a place in the panoply of Confederate arms. The top of the frame is marked only ‘London’ and the side of the frame ‘J. Adams’. The left side of the frame is marked ‘Patent No. 2361′”. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are gray/brown with scattered staining and pitting. Traces of finish are found in protected areas. Stocks worn over checking with traces of orig varnish present. Front blade site and wedge are replacements. 4-31374 JS112 (2,000-4,000)

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1122

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MARTIAL FLINT PISTOL. SN NSN. Cal. 54. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “This alteration to percussion is attributed to M. A. Baker of Fayetteville, North Carolina. The alteration is unusual in that instead of brazing a bolster to the bbl, a quarter section was removed from the bbl and a new section with the bolster was brazed back in place. Orig pan is filled such that the small bolster rests atop lockplate. Bbl is clearly marked ‘N. Carolina’. Hammer is the correct, ‘S’-curved shape and this pistol is the only known example that has the orig hammer.” You are bidding on possibly the only North Carolina surcharged Baker, Fayetteville conversion in complete and in superb condition. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are all gray with scattered staining and pitting. Wood is very good, showing orig varnish and inspector’s cartouche. Initials “JB” are carved in stock opposite lock. Lock and bbl markings are all discernible. Hammer screw is a possible replacement. 4-31360 JS183 (4,000-6,000)

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1123

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MARTIAL FLINT PISTOL. SN NSN. Cal. 54. According to Mr. Michel, “This alteration is by T. J. Adams of Richmond, Virginia. The bolster housing the nipple alteration to percussion is brazed to the bbl and rests with bottom on the orig lockplate. Lockplate has been cleaned of its orig markings and pan removed with the areas filled as a base for the bolster. It is marked with Roman numerals characteristic of Adams’ alterations, except for the hammer, which is marked number ’14’ on the interior surface.” CONDITION: Metal surfaces all cleaned with scattered staining and pitting. Lock is devoid of all markings except for residual “A” stamped near center of plate. Hammer is over-cleaned and recolored. Stock is sound with a couple hairline cracks, scattered scratches and nicks. Residual cartouches are still visible from when inspected as flintlock. 4-31354 JS185 (3,000-5,000)

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1124

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MARTIAL FLINT PISTOL. SN NSN. Mr. Michel describes this Model 1836 pistol as follows: “This alteration to percussion of a Model 1836 pistol is by unknown person or company. Bolster is similar to that used on muskets altered by Union Manufacturing Co. of Richmond, Virginia. Curved bottom of bolster is neatly filled to remnant of orig brass pan. Lockplate has only faint remnants of orig markings.” This gun appears all orig and complete, and it exhibits a most unusual and displayable conversion hammer and bolster alteration. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are all cleaned and pitted overall. Lock and bbl markings are discernible. Stock is sound and cleaned with several dents and scratches. Inspector cartouches are still visible. 4-31362 JS178 (3,000-5,000)

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1125

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MARTIAL FLINT PISTOL. SN NSN. Cal. 54. Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes this gun as follows: “This brazed bolster alteration varies from alterations done by Adams in that the bolster is inlet into the lockplate rather than resting atop the plate and is larger than the bolsters employed by Adams. The assembly number ‘6’ is also different from the Roman numerals used by Adams. The lockplate has remnants of the orig markings indicating this pistol was made by Johnson rather than Waters.” You are bidding on an unusual Virginia brazed bolster conversion with an interesting and presentable blacksmith-style hammer. CONDITION: Metal surfaces all cleaned gray/bright and pitted. Markings are well-struck and discernible. Stock has numerous scratches, dings, and gouges, though residual cartouches are present. Mainspring is broken. Hammer screw is a replacement. 4-31358 JS182 (3,000-5,000)

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1126

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MARTIAL FLINT PISTOL. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “This brazed bolster alteration to percussion of a Model 1836 pistol is similar to the work done by Adams except that the bolster, instead of resting atop the orig lockplate, is inlet into the lockplate. The 3 faceted bolster is similar to the bolster used on alterations of Virginia Manufactory muskets believed to be the work of Francis Persignon of Richmond, Virginia. All parts of this pistol are marked with the combination of Roman numerals found on Adams’ alterations, in this case VI and IX. Lockplate still shows traces of orig. Asa Waters marking.” This pistol appears orig, authentic, and complete in every regard. CONDITION: All metal is cleaned bright with scattered pitting. Because of cleaning, lock markings are weak, as are bbl proofs. Stock is sanded, though sound, exhibiting one hairline crack behind lock. Cartouches are discernible, as are initials carved on right hand side of grip. 4-31356 JS180 (3,000-5,000)

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1127

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MARTIAL FLINT PISTOL. SN NSN. Cal. 54. Mr. Michel describes this brazed bbl alteration as follows: “This brazed bbl alteration to percussion of a Model 1836 pistol is attributed to D. C. Hodgkins of Macon, Georgia. Bbl is marked ‘* Pope E. Hill, Waycross Ga *’, the significance of which is unknown, as is the marking around the muzzle of bbl, ‘**Tootsie R***** Mch 18, 1917’. The pitol has been polished bright. Lockplate shows traces of orig Asa Waters markings.” If this pistol could only speak. Who was Tootsie, and what did she do on March 18, 1917? Since this pistol was altered in Macon, Georgia, it didn’t travel a long way in 50 years to get to Waycross, Georgia, where Pope Hill gave this gun to Tootsie R. You are bidding on a rare Confederate alteration with a probable interesting post-war history. CONDITION: All metal parts of this gun are polished bright with inscription as described above. Orig markings, because of polishing, are visible but weak. Stock is sound with a couple hairline cracks, scattered scratches and dents, and residual cartouches from when it was a flint. 4-31359 JS179 (3,000-5,000)

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1128

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MARTIAL FLINT PISTOL. SN NSN. Cal. 54. Mr. Michel in his notes describes this Model 1836 U.S. martial pistol as follows: “This alteration to percussion uses a snail-shaped bolster similar to pistols altered by J. P. Murray of Columbus, Georgia, but this pistol does not have the same marking on bottom of bbl, and in bbl channel as has the alteration currently attributed to Murray. Lockplate has been replaced with a civilian-type plate marked ‘O. Mazange & Co. / Mobile’.” This is a very unusual pistol. Not only does it exhibit Confederate alteration, it also exhibits a civilian lock and hammer with a Mobile, Alabama agent. You will never have the opportunity to buy such a rare and uniquely marked gun. CONDITION: Bbl, lock, backstrap, and trigger guard are all brown with scattered pitting. Stock retains orig inspection cartouches when this gun was orig made as a military flint. Loading assembly appears to be restored. 4-31361 JS177 (3,000-5,000)

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1129

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MARTIAL FLINT PISTOL. SN NSN. Cal. 54. Mr. Michel describes this pistol as follows: “This pistol is the flintlock Model 1836 altered to percussion by brazing a bolster to the location of the orig touchhole. Brazed bolster and bench assembly marks are similar to those used in the alterations by Adams, but bolster seams are more crudely finished and have a more humped shape. Orig lockplate markings have all been effaced.” You are bidding on a classic, Confederate, brazed bolster conversion that the armory removed all US markings, and this gun is in wonderful, “as found” condition, orig and complete in every regard. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are brown/gray with scattered pitting. Stock retains much of its orig varnish with numerous old scrapes, nicks, and gouges. Residual inspector cartouche is still present. 4-31357 JS184 (3,000-5,000)

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1130

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MARTIAL FLINT PISTOL. SN NSN. Cal. 54. Mr. Michel describes the pistol as follows: “Although there is nothing except one’s imagination to classify this pistol as a Confederate alteration to percussion of a Model 1836 pistol, there is something about the hard usage this pistol has seen that speaks of both the necessity of pressing old arms to the service of the Confederacy and the use of local blacksmiths or even gunsmiths to convert these old guns to meet the immediate need to arm the troops. This pistol has been altered skillfully using the side drum method, well-filled into the area of the pan. It is cracked through the wrist and a large section of wood is broken away above the lockplate.” This gun does appear to be a well-used percussion pistol with a typical, blacksmith conversion and hammer. CONDITION: Metal surfaces with exception of ramrod assembly are dark, pitted, and as found. Lock and bbl markings are well struck and discernible. Ramrod assembly appears restored and is gray/brown and pitted. Stock has large, unrepaired crack through wrist and a 2-1/2″ x 1/2″ piece missing behind lock at breech. Stock retains residual cartouches. Mainspring is broken. 4-31363 JS181 (3,000-5,000)

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1131

CONFEDERATE ALTERATION OF MARTIAL FLINT PISTOL. SN NSN. Cal. 54. Mr. Michel describes this gun as follows: “This alteration of a flintlock Model 1836 pistol to percussion was done by T. J. Adams of Richmond, Virginia. The alteration is by use of a brazed bolster which, at the bottom, rests on the lockplate where the cut out for the original flintlock pan has been filled to make a solid base for the bolster. The lockplate shows traces of the orig A. Waters markings. The swivel ramrod is a replacement. The internal parts are marked with the Roman numeral ‘XII’ which also appears at the tail of the left flat opposite the lock.” CONDITION: Metal surfaces, with exception of ramrod assembly, are gray/black and pitted. Lock markings are still discernible. Bbl proofs are mostly obscured. Loading assembly and hammer screw are replaced. Stock is solid with residual cartouche and some remaining varnish. Roman numeral ‘XII’ is cut into stock opposite lock, and a thin 1″ piece of gold is inlaid adjacent to the Roman numeral. 4-31355 JS186 (3,000-5,000)

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1132

DOUBLE BARREL SHOTGUN PISTOL. SN NSN. Approx. 24 ga. This is amost unusual, “attic” condition weapon you will see. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states: “Double barrel caliber 58 pistol with unmarked lockplates. While there is absolutely nothing of Confederate manufacture about this pistol, it is precisely the sort of weapon a Confederate cavalryman, lacking a good Colt pistol, would put to use in unseating his opponent. Interestingly, the long tang of the breech ends in a screw hole replaced with a loop, perfect for the attachment of a leather thong to suspend this weapon at the owner’s side. Another hole also appears at the end of the stock where apparently another loop at one time wore away the surrounding wood”. CONDITION: Gun appears in “as found” condition. Metal surfaces are gray/brown with scattered scratches and pitting. Brass surfaces have patina in deep areas. 4-31376 JS106 (500-1,000)

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1133

CANTON FROM CONFEDERATE FIRST NATIONAL FLAG. Blue silk canton, approx. 42″ x 43″, with 12 white silk stars, was orig in The Catalogue of America’s War Museum in 1899. This flag was displayed as Gunther No. 4, “Rebel Flag from the first design”. This flag was in the Chicago Historical Society, deaccessioned in the late 1960s. Photos exist of this flag complete, but only the canton remains today. On edges of canton, you can clearly see the disintegrating red, white, and red, stripes. Howard Madaus, in his report on this flag, states: “On Monday of this week I delivered to Mr. Thomas Welter…the remaining fragments of the red and white striped of the 1st National Confederate flag, of which you obtained the canton. After measuring the surviving pieces (which were lacquered in 1936), I have determined that the flag extended 64 inches beyond the canton. As you can see from the enclosed photographs taken shortly after the flag was opened, the lacquering caused the central section of the bars to deteriorate; surprisingly, however, the fly portion remains in good condition…” Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Blue canton with eleven white stars. This canton was once part of a First National Flag of the Confederacy. It was part of the Gunther collection deaccessioned by the Chicago Historical Society. Photos exist of the complete flag, but only the canton remains as the three stripes disintegrated into small fragments from age and, presumably, poor storage. According to the ”Catalogue of America’s War Museum“, 1899, this flag was displayed as Gunther No. 4, “Rebel flag from the first design.”” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 1-1/2″ wool hoist is solid. Silk canton and stars show numerous cracks and tears, but for the most part, canton is complete. Flag was not unframed to examine mounting. 4-31455 JS171 (5,000-8,000)

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1135
Revised: 10/19/2007

(Additional Information) We have been told by one saddle collector that they question the originality of the CS shield on this saddle. Subsequent research reveals that the shield is Zinc and antique and identical to that which is illustrated on pp.156 of Confederate Saddles and Horse Equipment by Ken R. Knopp. We therefore guarantee that the shield is original, old and genuine; the saddle is definitely old and genuine; however we cannot, and will not guarantee that the shield has always been with this saddle.

CONFEDERATE MCCLELLAN SADDLE WITH “CS” SADDLE SHIELD This saddle is a Confederate Arsenal copy of the Regulation Model 1859 McClellan saddle, having a 2″ pewter shield with raised letters “CS” attached to front of tree. Rawhide, split, open seat with brown leather skirts, cinch straps, and stirrup straps. Small, solid brass stirrups are attached. There are some leather repairs around front of rawhide tree to repair splits in the rawhide. One leather repair goes over 1/2″ of the saddle shield. Skirts appear orig and are attached with brass screws. Cinch straps appear orig. Cinch itself has been replaced with smaller leather strap. “CS” marked Confederate McClellan saddles, such as this one, are very rare. We can find no more than 3 or 4 in private and institutional collections. This is a rare opportunity to own the best marked Confederate saddle available. CONDITION: Rawhide is fairly sound with splitting and openings at sewn edges. Wood is exposed in front of tree. Seat is worn, but seat hardware is intact along with the finely patinaed pewter “CS” saddle shield. 4-31378 JS173 (15,000-25,000)

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1136

CONFEDERATE MCCLELLAN SADDLE. Confederate copy of a McClellan cavalry saddle with rawhide, split, open seat, black leather skirts, cinch straps, stirrup straps, and stirrup hoods. This barebones Confederate copy lacks slots for attachment of valise or bed roll. PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Rawhide seat has openings at sewing along front of tree, along with stitch losses on back of saddle behind tree. Skirts are intact, attached with brass screws. Cinch straps on one side are broken off. Stirrup straps appear replaced, as do iron, leather-hooded stirrups, though they are old. One stirrup strap has English maker’s mark. 4-31379 JS174 (3,000-5,000)

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1137

CIVIL WAR ERA HOPE TEXAS SADDLE. This distinctive saddle with the broad, flat horn was one design by Adolphus Hope in Texas, probably in the 1830s. Hope continued to make saddles well into the 1850s, but his pattern was copied throughout Texas, and many military people liked the style and continued to use them, especially in the South. At the beginning of the Civil War, some Confederate officers sought out Hope saddles for themselves and their mounted troops. The most characteristic feature of a Hope saddle is the massive, broad, flat saddle horn, covered in rawhide for durability. This example has long skirts, which is atypical, but skirts and seat are decorated in floral designs, typical of Texas decorated saddles. This saddle is accompanied by a set of saddle bags that were found with it. PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Saddle is in very good condition, apparently with all orig parts. Some seam separation is apparent. Leather surface is very good. Skirts are crazed and mottled. Decorations are still strongly detailed. Most iron and brass attachments are intact. Major seams of saddle are sewn with leather cord and are intact. Cinch, wooden stirrups and stirrup straps are intact. A quarter-size brass rosette with horseshoe design at back of seat is typical of rosettes excavated in battlefield sifts and campgrounds. Saddle bags are sound and pliable. Each bag is closed with 3 straps with roller buckles. Three of the roller buckles are missing, as three of the straps are also broken. Cloth linings of saddle bags are sound. Surfaces are crazed and mottled, with one bag being particularly soiled, with stitching coming loose. Saddle bags still display well with saddle. 4-31382 JS172 (2,000-4,000)

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1138

CONFEDERATE USED SOUTHERN PLANTATION SADDLE. This saddle is one of two saddles recovered from a Gettysburg, Pennsylvania barn sale. As Mr. Michel states, “this saddle is typical of the type of ‘useful souvenir’ taken by the citizens of Gettysburg after the battle.” This particular saddle is one of numerous variations of plantation saddles popular throughout the South. It has a brown, leather seat and skirts mounted on a horsehair-filled, cloth body. Brass and iron tacks attach seat to saddle tree and sewn body. Stirrup straps appear orig and contain typical 19th century iron stirrups. Cinch straps also appear orig. CONDITION: Overall saddle is good. 1-1/2″ x 1/2″ hole in top of seat is apparently caused by insect or vermin. Surfaces of leather are scraped and scuffed. Several iron and brass tacks are missing. 4-31381 JS175 (2,000-4,000)

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1139

CONFEDERATE USED PLANTATION SADDLE. This saddle was recovered from the same Gettysburg, Pennsylvania barn sale as Lot #1138, and Mr. Michel states, “This is the type of ‘useful souvenir’ taken by the citizens of Gettysburg after the battle.” This saddle consists of black leather seat and decorated skirts and horsehair-filled cloth body. cinch straps are probably replaced, as is cinch. Cinch straps are also repair for continued use. CONDITION: Leather surfaces are good, with scuffing and wear at high areas. Geometric decoration is visible on seat and skirts. Cloth saddle body has several large tears, exposing horsehair. Stirrup straps and iron stirrups are sound, though probably replaced. Cinch shows numerous repairs for continued use. 4-31380 JS176 (2,000-4,000)

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1140

AUGUSTA ARSENAL CARTRIDGE PACK. For packs of Confederate cartridges, this pack is in remarkably fine condition. Ten orig cartridges and caps will be found in this paper-wrapped, string-tied pack with paper label which reads: “TEN CARTRIDGES, / FOR / Enfield Rifle and Minnie, / OR RIFLE MUSKET / Cal. 57 & 58 / AUGUSTA ARSENAL, GA. / Nov. 1864”. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Full packet of Confederate Augusta Arsenal cartridges. Pasted on label reads, “Ten Cartridges / for / Enfield Rifle and Minnie / or Rifle Musket / Cal .57 or .58 / Augusta Arsenal Ga / Nov 1864”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31437 JS85 (5,000-8,000)

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1141

RICHMOND ARSENAL CARTRIDGE PACK WITH ORIGINAL GARDNER CARTRIDGE. Very rare Confederate cartridge pack, orig containing Gardner cartridges, the one retained with this pack has cracked paper exposing powder, otherwise is complete. Reformed and tied pack has pasted label that reads “10 cartridges cal 577 or 58 / Richmond Arsenal 186_”. Gardner cartridges are very rarely offered, and due to their fragility, few survive. This is the only pack that we have seen, and though soiled and worn, it is still a very attractive grouping. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Brown color paper packet with glued label. Pictured in Salamander Book, ”Fighting Men of the Civil WarMr.“ by William C. Davis, p. 54.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31434 JS79 (3,000-5,000)

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1142

MACON ARSENAL MISSISSIPPI RIFLE CARTRIDGE AND PACK. In this display, there is an orig Macon Arsenal rifle cartridge from this pack or a similar pack. The pack is very fragile and has a pasted label that reads “10 Mississippi rifle cal. 54 / Conical Ball / Mason Arsenal / 1862”. This pack appears orig and unopened with several small, glued repairs to edges. Mr. Michel’s notes read: “The packet is empty and has been reformed to its original appearance”. If this pack has been reformed and brought back to its orig appearance, a master restorer did this using similar cartridges instead of stuffing it with cotton or paper like most reformed packs. We believe this pack is full of orig cartridges, but we are basing our estimate on Mr. Michel’s notes. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Brown color paper packet with glued label reading, “10 / Mississippi Rifle / Cal .54 / Conical Ball / Main Arsenal / 1862” with one of the cartridges from the packet. Packet is empty and has been reformed to original appearance. Pictured in Salamander Book, ”Fighting Men of the Civil War“ by William C. Davis, p. 55.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31433 JS84 (3,000-5,000)

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1143

FAYETTEVILLE ARSENAL CARTRIDGE PACK. This display contains an orig .58 cal Fayetteville minie cartridge, complete and in nice condition, along with an orig pack of caps, and the orig paper wrapper (salmon-colored), reformed to its orig appearance and retied with its orig string. Though unmarked, this cartridge and pack is known to be a product of the Fayetteville arsenal among cartridge collectors. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Salmon color paper packet (empty) reformed to original appearance with one of the paper wrap cartridges from the packet and caps from the packet.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31435 JS79 (1,000-2,000)

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1144

ENFIELD CARTRIDGE PACK. Orig Enfield cartridge pack is accompanied by a single cartridge and pack of caps. Boxwood Enfield bullet has base mark of “57”. These bullets are commonly excavated with same base mark throughout battlefields of both Eastern and Western armies. Cartridge pack is stenciled, “1860 / for / Rifle Musket/63 / Bullet .55 Diar. / Wax – / Powder 2½ Drs. / WOOD PLUG”. Cartridge pack is empty but reformed and retied with its orig string. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Enfield cartridge packet. Brown paper stenciled in black, “1860 / Rifle Musket / 53 / Bullet .55 Diam / Wax / Powder 2½ Drs. / WOOD PLUG” with caps and cartridge.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31436 JS82 (1,000-2,000)

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1145

LYNCHBURG ARSENAL CARTRIDGE PACKET. This display contains a complete and perfect Lynchburg Arsenal cartridge, a loose 3-ring minie ball, and a paper containing orig caps from the packet, and the orig red/brown paper wrap of the orig 10-cartridge packet. Orig paper has had a form placed inside such that paper could be rewrapped and given the appearance of a full pack. It is retied with orig string. Though this packet is unmarked, it is known to cartridge collectors as a product of the Lynchburg Arsenal. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Brown paper packet (empty) reformed to original appearance with one of the paper wrap cartridges from the packet, a bullet from the packet, and caps from the packet. Pictured in Salamander Book, ”Fighting Men of the Civil War“ by William C. Davis, p. 54.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31432 JS80 (1,000-2,000)

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1146

CONFEDERATE SHARPS CARTRIDGE. This cartridge is out of a complete pack of Confederate-manufactured Sharps. A photograph of an orig pack of Confederate Sharps is shown on back side of case holding this cartridge. Cartridge appears complete and intact. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Cartridge is all complete and intact with photo of original packet from which it came.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31439 JS75 (200-400)

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1147

CONFEDERATE .52 CALIBER RINGTAIL SHARPS CARTRIDGE Mr. Michel’s notes state the paper tail of cartridge is torn and powder is removed and replaced with cotton for presentation. This is a very scarce example of a Confederate Sharps cartridge. CONDITION: 4-31443 JS74 (200-400)

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1148

COLUMBUS ARSENAL ENFIELD CARTRIDGE. Nice, complete paper cartridge with minie from orig pack marked “Columbus Arsenal, 1864 for Enfield Rifle and minie for rifled musket .577 caliber”. Cartridge is in very good condition; however, small crack near tail allows grains of powder to escape in display. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Cartridge is all complete and intact with photo of original packet from which it came.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31441 JS77 (200-400)

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1149

ENFIELD RIFLE CARTRIDGE FROM AUGUSTA ARSENAL. Complete English-style Confederate made Enfield cartridge in good condition overall still retains wax on surface of paper around ball. Orig pack from which it came is pictured on back of display. Label said “For Enfield rifle and minnie or rifled musket, cal 57 and 58, Augusta Arsenal, Georgia, 1864”. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Cartridge is all complete and intact with photo of original packet from which it came.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31440 JS78 (200-400)

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1150

CS LABORATORY NAVY PISTOL CARTRIDGE PACK. This display contains paper stenciled over wood block, still discernible is “cartridges / __lts Navy Pistol / CS Laboratory / Richmond, VA”. One perfect cartridge is displayed and four fragment cartridges are still in pack. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Wood packet for navy pistol cartridges. Packet with paper over wood block, stenciled, “Cartridges / Colts Navy Pistol / CS Laboratory / Richmond Va” with one complete and intact cartridge and other cartridge fragments.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31430 JS87 (2,000-4,000)

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1151

RICHMOND CONFEDERATE STATES ARMORY NAVY PISTOL CARTRIDGE PACK. This wood block with pasted label unfortunately is only about 3/4 complete. It still retains 4 broken cartridges. Label reads “(Si)x cartridges / for / (COL)T’S Navy Pistol / made at the / (Labora)tory of Confederate States Armory / Richmond, Va”. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Wood block with pasted on label. End is broken off but label reads, “(Si)x Cartridges / for / (Col)t’s Navy Pistol / made at the / (Labora)tory of Confederate States Army / Richmond Va”. Pictured in Salamander Book, ”Fighting Men of the Civil WarMr.“ by William C. Davis, p. 55.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31429 JS88 (2,000-4,000)

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1152

CS LABORATORY PACKET FOR ARMY PISTOL CARTRIDGES. In this display are two .44 cal. CS laboratory pistol cartridges, both with broken papers and missing powder. The orig wood block for 6 cartridges is also contained in display with partial label where the only discernible text is “6 cart” and a few other letters. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Packet with paper over wood block. Only fragments of paper remain but size and remnant of stenciling establish this is the correct packet for the “Army Pistol”. With two cartridges. One is intact, the other has broken paper.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31431 JS86 (1,000-2,000)

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1153

LYNCHBURG ARSENAL CARTRIDGE. .58 cal, 3-ring minie ball is exposed and broken paper cartridge from an orig Lynchburg Arsenal pack. Only ball and large remnants of paper remain. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Broken condition.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31475 JS78 (200-400)

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1154

.56 CAL COLT MUSKET CARTRIDGE. Mr. Michel’s notes state this cartridge was manufactured at Selma, AL arsenal. Casing for bullet is made of gut. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This cartridge manufactured at Selma Arsenal. All complete and intact.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31442 JS73 (200-400)

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1155

CONFEDERATE LABORATORY .44 ARMY PISTOL CARTRIDGE. This cartridge is complete and in fine condition showing nicely patinated lead and delicate string still tying paper and powder to lead. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Paper cartridge string tied to bullet cartridge is all complete and intact.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31445 JS76 (200-400)

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1156

MORSE CARTRIDGE. Approx. 50 cal. Morse brass cartridge with excavated Confederate .50 cal Morse inserted. Morse cartridges of any configuration are quite scarce, and this will display nicely with any Morse firearm. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Cartridge complete with removable ring and primer cap. No powder. Bullet inserted into body.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Excavated bullet fits loosely, as brass is of slightly larger caliber. Papier mache flange which holds cap is removable. 4-31444 JS72 (300-500)

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1157

CONFEDERATE CARTRIDGES AND POWDER FROM PORT HUDSON. In about a 4″ x 3″, Richmond, Virginia tobacco tin is contained portions of two or three cartridges and a vile of black powder, complete with a tag that reads: “Confederate cartridges and powder from Port Hudson, LA, July 1863”. Bullets contained are two 69 cal. buck-and-ball and a 69 cal. 3-ring minie. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Old Edgeworth Tobacco “Plug Slice” tin (Larus & Bro. Co. of Richmond, Virginia) with cartridge fragments, vial of powder labeled “Port Hudson Powder” and old label reading “Confederate Cartridges & Powder from Port Hudson, La July 1863”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31476 JS71 (200-400)

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1158

LEMAT PISTOL BULLET MOLD. Very rare LeMat pistol mold. This is a typical LeMat mold with triple cavity. One for the rifle pistol ball and 2 for shot for the grapeshot bbl. This mold is SN 18 on the iron sprue and has an oval maker’s cartouche inside mold which is no longer easily discernible. Since these molds are so rare and generally only come with very low SNs, some authorities have guessed that these molds were only issued with the First Model revolvers, so this mold would have probably been issued with SN 18 LeMat revolver. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Three-cavity mold casting 2 round balls and 1 conical ball. Casting would result in 9 balls for cylinder and 18 round balls for the ‘buckshot’ barrel. (See mold pictured in Doug Adams’ ‘The Confederate Le Mat Revolver’, p. 35.) This is evidently the mold for the First Model LeMat revolver and is lightly stamped with number ‘18’ on one sprue cutter.” PROVENANCE: Originally sold by Robert Miller of N. Virginia in 1960s. He sold it as an early battlefield recovery from the Battlefield of the 2nd Manassas CONDITION: Iron sprew and retaining screw are pitted overall. Brass body is cleaned. Uncleaned areas have deep patination and pitting. The SN is discernible but light in sprue. Maker’s cartouche is visible but not readable inside cavity 4-31377 JS97 (3,000-5,000)

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1159

ENFIELD .577 CALIBER BULLET MOLD. This well-made, brass, scissor-type, Enfield mold is stamped “25” meaning “25 gauge” with translate in American cals. to .577″. Mold is complete with removable iron base plug and set screw. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Brass mold for cal. .58 or .577 solid bullet with plug insert marked “25”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Mold is very good overall, showing filing and tool marks on one arm. Iron surfaces are gray/black with some staining and pitting to set screw. 4-31452 JS99 (300-500)

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1160

BRASS MOLD FOR .58 CALIBER, 3-RING MINIE. This very unusual brass mold casts a 3-ring minie from the base on its side. Mold is now missing the base plug which it would have required to make the cavity. Mold shows Southern-style finishing marks and casting flaws, and mold was possibly Confederate-made. Bullet made here appears to be what bullet collectors call a “Confederate high ring, 3-ring minie”. These bullets are typically found in certain battle and camp sites of the Army of N. VA and are quite scarce. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Brass mold for .58 or .577 caliber bullet. Casts three-ring bullet.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Surface is well-patinated. Overall, very good condition. 4-31453 JS105 (300-500)

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1160A

BULLET MOLD FOR .64 CALIBER ROUND BALL. Single cavity, scissor-type, iron bullet mold. Mr. Michel’s notes state it was for a Hall’s rifle, and it appears to be the correct .64 cal. for a Hall. PROVENANCE: Ben Michell collection. CONDITION: Gray/black metal surfaces with scattered pitting and staining overall. 4-31454 JS96 (50-75)

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1161

BRASS MOLD FOR CASTING ENFIELD-STYLE BULLET AND TWO SMALL ROUND BALLS. This crudely-made mold has a well-finished interior to cast a combination of 1 smooth-sided .58 caliber bullet and 2 shot, approx. .36 cal. If there were ever a mold, unmarked, that we could say was Confederate, this would be it. The Enfield bullet made by this mold was poured from the top, and so would have had a sprue cut from the top. Similar bullets are found in Confederate camp and battle sites. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Crudely made exterior but well finished mold to cast a combination of a .58 or .577 caliber bullet and two approximately .36 caliber balls (to make up a buckshot or buck and ball cartridge?)” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Pin in mold appears replaced. Base plug for bullet is missing as is set pin for mold. Mold is cleaned in areas, but most of surface has deep, rich patina over scattered dings and scratches. 4-31451 JS104 (300-500)

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1162

.44 CALIBER PISTOL MOLD. Solid brass scissor-type mold retained by very crude iron, peened-over pin, produces an approximate .44 cal. smooth, conical ball and a round ball. The number “42” is stamped on one of the arms. Mr. Michel’s notes state: “Brass mold casting either a cal .44 conical bullet or a cal. 44 round ball. These molds are believed to be made by the manufacturers of Confederate handguns.” Regardless if this mold is Confederate manufactured or not, similar bullets produced by this mold are commonly excavated in areas occupied by Confederate cavalry. CONDITION: This mold has seen some use. Numerous small dings and dents are found throughout its surface. 4-31447 JS100 (300-500)

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1163

BRASS SIDE POUR .58 OR .577 CALIBER 3-RING BULLET MOLD. This mold has many English features in the way it was made, but shows casting flaws typical of Confederate manufacture. “Potts” is stamped onto one handle. Bullet produced by this mold is typically found excavated in Confederate infantry sites. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Mold for side pour of 3-ring cal. .58 or .577 bullet. One of handles stamped, “POTTS”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Mold overall is very good with scattered dings, dents, and scratches. Pin is pitted. Brass surface retains rich patina throughout. 4-31449 JS101 (300-500)

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1164

BRASS BULLET MOLD FOR 2-RING BULLET. Very unusual, well made, solid brass mold for 2-ring, flat based bullet, possibly for carbine. Mold appears to be about .58 caliber. Both arms of mold are marked “CAK”. “CAK” is possibly an inspector, as this mold is so well made. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Brass mold casting 2-ring .58 or .577 caliber bullet. Both handles stamped with initials “C A K”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Brass surfaces overall are very good, with scattered dings and scratches. Other wise brass has good patina with some staining. Iron screw at pivot is pitted. 4-31450 JS98 (300-500)

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1165

.69 CALIBER ENFIELD MOLD. Typical English-style scissor mold made of solid brass with attached iron sprue cutter. Under spruce cutter, mold is marked “16” which would have corresponded to 16-gauge, or .662″, which would have probably made a ball for a .69 cal. rifled musket. This mold is complete with base plug and set screw. This is a scarce mold. Bullets from molds like this are commonly found in early war Confederate sites. Erroneously stamped on the side of this mold is “.577”, which would have been for a standard 25 ga. mold. How that marking got here is anyone’s guess, but it appears contemporarily to the Civil War. Maybe this is the reason this mold was exported to the Confederacy. CONDITION: Brass surfaces are well-patinated over surface scratches and dings. Iron screws and sprue cutter have scattered pitting. 4-31448 JS103 (300-500)

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1166

BRASS BULLET MOLD FOR .36 CALIBER PISTOL. Solid brass, scissor-type mold with double cavity for .36 cal. conical ball and .36 cal. rnd ball. This mold is retained by a brass pin. Number “52” is partially cast into 1 arm, and initials “HW” OR “MH” are cut inside one arm. Mr. Michel’s notes state: “Brass mold casting either a .36 cal. conical bullet or a .36 cal. round ball. These molds are believed made by the manufacturers of Confederate handguns.” Bullets like these are commonly excavated from Confederate battle and camp sites. CONDITION: Brass surfaces have been cleaned. Numerous file marks are present on surfaces. Numerous dents and dings are present on most surfaces of this mold. 4-31446 JS102 (300-500)

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1167
Revised: 10/19/2007

(Correction)This tool is actually a pattern “4”, not a pattern “3”.

ENFIELD COMBINATION GUN TOOL. This particular gun tool could do most anything to a Enfield rifle or musket. There are commonly excavated, complete or just pieces. Theoretically, the sgt of each Enfield armed co would have such a tool. Tool contains screwdriver, mainspring wrench, various worms, extractors, and oiler. This particular tool is complete and in very good condition. Mr. Michel’s notes state that this is an English Pattern No. 3 Sgt’s Gun Wrench of 1858. CONDITION: Tool retains much of its orig finish and does not appear to have been used. 4-31321 JS95 (300-400)

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1168

CONFEDERATE FOOT OFFICER’S SWORD WITH CAST “CS” IN HILT. This Confederate copy of a Model 1850 foot officer’s sword exhibits a 1″ oval with “CS” cast into hilt, opposite floral decoration. Foliate decorations surround the “CS” medallion. A large flower is cast into bottom guard. Several different makers are known to have made these swords, including Leech & Rigdon of Memphis, Tennessee and other locations; Conning of Mobile, Alabama; and others. We feel this sword is probably made in Mobile by Conning or another maker due to the style of blade. Blade is half-round on spine and cutting edge at ricasso, which is typical of Conning. This blade is very lightly etched in about a 12″ panel on both sides of blade. Only scattered floral motifs are visible in this etching. Grip is leather-wrapped with twisted brass wire. Scabbard is brass-mounted, back sewn leather. Scabbard mounts are retained with screws on back side. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate foot officer’s sword. Single, unstopped, fuller blade. Scabbard has leather replaced. Mounts are original.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray/bright with traces of etch visible. Grip retains about 90% of orig leather with all its orig wire. Hilt and brass wire retain rich patina. Scabbard mounts are cleaned. Scabbard leather is replaced. 4-31390 JS11 (4,000-6,000)

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1169

CONFEDERATE CAVALARY SABER. This sword is possibly a product of Louis Froelich at the Confederate States Armory in Kenansville, North Carolina. Most Froelich products exhibit the classic Froelich hilt and flat, plain pommel, where this sword exhibits Confederate-made 1860-style hilt. Blade and scabbard are very similar, if not identical, to other known Kenansville products. Blade is classic, unstopped, fullered, and 35″ long. Scabbard is lap seamed with pinned throat, typical of other known Froelich products. Grip is leather covered with single brass wire wrap. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This Confederate cavalry saber has yet to be identified as to the manufacturer. While it is somewhat crudely made, it is certainly a serviceable weapon capable of doing as much damage as its better made contemporaries. The counterguard has a casting flaw hole. The guard does not appear to be marked in any fashion, nor does the scabbard. The scabbard is typical of most all of these swords, crudely brazed at the seam and mounted with brass rings and a brass throat piece.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is bright with old sharpening and scattered areas of staining. Scabbard retains a portion of its orig brown coating. Grip retains about 10% of its orig leather and two turns of its orig copper wire. Brass hilt and scabbard mounts exhibit nice mustard patina. 4-31393 JS2 (3,500-5,500)

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1170

CONFEDERATE FOOT OFFICER’S SWORD. This is a nice example of a New Orleans-made foot officer’s sword, probably by Thomas, Griswold & Co., New Orleans, though unmarked. 29-1/2″, pen knife-style blade is hand-forged and shows areas of orig polish. Grip is highly polished brown leather with twisted wire. Hilt is a copy of U.S. 1850 foot. Orig, red cloth, protective washer is intact. Backstitched leather scabbard exhibits scalloped middle and top brass mounts. Scalloped scabbard mounts are distinctive to Griswold & Dufihlo of New Orleans. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate foot officer’s sword. Single fuller blade with curved stop at ricasso and “pen kife” cut for blade. Appears to be product of Thomas Griswold & Co., New Orleans, Louisiana.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Sword overall appears untouched. Blade is gray/bright with scattered areas of staining and pitting, especially at tip. Grip retains 90%+ of orig shine with scuffing at high areas. Brass hilt and top two brass scabbard mounts exhibit nice patina. Top mount has several dents. Drag appears replaced. Leather scabbard body is dry and hard. 4-31387 JS7 (4,500-6,500)

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1171

FOOT OFFICER’S SWORD. 31″ “pen knife” style blade is typical of New Orleans and French made swords. Blade shows remnants of etching on ricasso and spine. Blade is hand-forged, showing uneven fullers and waves in blade. Brass hilt is a copy of a Model 1850 foot. Scabbard is brass mounted, back sewn leather. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate foot officer’s sword. Small fuller blade with unstopped fuller and “pen knife” cut for blade.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Leather grip and wire wrap are very good and complete, exhibiting wear only at high spots. Brass hilt exhibits nice patina. Blade is gray with areas of pitting, old grinding, and recoloring. Scabbard is a reproduction. 4-31388 JS5 (1,000-2,000)

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1172

CONFEDERATE FOOT OFFICER’S SWORD. This Confederate sword was possibly made in New Orleans. We believe this to be a New Orleans-made sword due to the split pommel and scalloped scabbard mounts. Though the sword blade is not typically New Orleans, it is a classic, hand-forged, 30″, unstopped, fullered blade. The blade is hand-forged, showing the typical waves in the blade. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate foot officer’s sword. Single, unstopped, fuller blade. Appears to be product of James Conning of Mobile, Alabama. Scabbard has leather replaced. Mounts are original.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Brass hilt still retains strong traces of orig gilt. Blade is gray/bright with areas of staining and pitting. Tip of blade is bent. Grip leather and wire appear replaced. Scabbard leather is replaced, though mounts appear orig. Scabbard mounts have been cleaned, polished, and recolored. 4-31389 JS10 (3,000-5,000)

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1173

CONFEDERATE-USED FOOT OFFICER’S SWORD. This sword appears untouched and is a typical “attic” find. We cannot ascertain who made this sword, whether it was Confederate or imported; however, the scabbard has several features which could be Confederate manufactured, especially the hand-sewn frog. Sword exhibits 31″, flat, hand-forged blade. Guard is simple, brass “P” guard with a single extra branch. Grip lacks wire. Grip exhibits a 3/4″, decorated brass ferule and crudely cast, mushroom-shaped pommel. Scabbard is backstitched with brass drag and single brass carrying ring with frog attached by brass wire. CONDITION: Blade is gray with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Brass hilt and brass scabbard mounts exhibit good patina. Leather scabbard and frog are crazed with scuffing and loss of black surface. 4-31391 JS9 (1,000-2,000)

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1174

CONFEDERATE CAVALRY SABER MANUFACTURED BY LOUIS FROELICH AT THE CONFEDERATE STATES ARMORY, KENANSVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. Classic 35-1/2″ unstopped, fullered blade. Classic flat, plain pommel and guard exhibiting Roman numberal “VI” cut into hilt and matching Roman numeral cut into top of scabbard throat. Hilt has casting flaws. Scabbard is iron, lap seamed, and braised with brass mounts. Grip is leather covered with iron wire. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Cavalry saber manufactured by Louis Froehlich of Kenansville, North Carolina. The 35½” blade has an unstopped fuller from about ¾” from the guard to 7½” from the top. The blade is uncleaned with only age staining. The plain pommel 3-branch guard is typical of this manufacture and has the Roman numeral “VI” cut into the edge of the brass throat of the scabbard. The scabbard is of iron, somewhat crudely seamed, with brass ring mounts. There is a crack at the drag, but the scabbard is intact at that point. The hilt is canvas wrapped with iron wire.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade overall is gray/bright with scattered areas of black staining and pitting. Scabbard retains most of its original, red/brown paint, though there is a repair about 5″ above drag. Grip leather is about 90% intact, wire is complete. Protective washer is replaced. 4-31392 JS1 (4,500-6,500)

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1175

VIRGINIA MANUFACTORY CAVALRY SABER. This is a fine example of late-production Virginia Manufactory cavalry saber, shortened and re-scabbarded by Ames for the state of Virginia just prior to the Civil War. Ames’ conversion consisted of shortening the once massive blades to 34″ and adding a brass-mounted, iron scabbard. This example is much better than most examples encountered, as this example retains almost all of its orig grip wrap. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This cavalry saber is a 3rd Model Virginia Manufactory saber which has been slimmed and rescabbarded for Confederate usage. The new scabbard has brass ring mounts typical of this Confederate alteration.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is gray/bright with scattered nicks and resharpened cutting edge. Hilt exhibits a few minor dings and clearly shows forged manufacture with some laminated open seams. Grip retains about 80% leather wrap and orig brass wire, worn at high spots. Iron hilt and scabbard body exhibit good brown patina with pitting. 4-31394 JS5 (3,500-5,500)

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1176

CONFEDERATE CAVALRY SABER. This classic Confederate cavalry saber was probably made by Louis Haiman of Columbus, Georgia. Haiman features include lap seamed, lead-soldered scabbard with soldered throat and heavy, 1840-style hilts. Blade exhibits longitudinal faults. Another feature we have never seen on an enlisted cavalry saber before, but also often seen on Haiman officer swords, is a leather covering over scabbard body. Hilt is also more refined and finished on this example and may be an officer-carried “fighting sword.” Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate cavalry saber with finely cast, thick, brass guard. The grip is leather wrapped with plain iron wire. It is unmarked and is not identified as to the manufacturer. The scabbard is typically seamed but appears to be soldered rather than brazed. There are brass rings and the remnant of what apparently was leather wrapping on the scabbard itself. The entire sword is in “as found” condition, having remained untouched for a century and a half.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is brown/bright with areas of black staining and pitting. Protective washer is replaced. Grip retains almost all its orig leather and all orig iron wire. Grip is worn and scuffed on high spots. Hilt and brass mounts exhibit rich patina. Scabbard retains about 40% orig leather covering, though dry and split at seam. Scabbard retains orig soldered throat, which is missing on most examples by this maker. 4-31395 JS3 (3,500-5,500)

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1177

CONFEDERATE IMPORTED MODEL 1853 CAVALRY SABER. This is an example of the popular blockade run English cavalry saber with a 34-1/2″ blade, iron mounted scabbard, iron hilt, and compressed leather grips. This sword is devoid of markings, and Mr. Michel states that it was orig acquired from a family where it had been passed down through generations as the ancestors of a Confederate cavalryman. There is no reason to doubt that this was carried by a Confederate soldier, as this sword retains the look of other Confederate swords so preserved. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Pattern 53 Enfield cavalry saber. Iron hilt, 34¼” blade with iron scabbard. The sword is completely unmarked. Although the sword is not marked, it is typical of those imported to the Confederacy and was acquired from a family where it had been passed down through generations as the ancestor’s Confederate sword. While such oral “provenance” is notoriously and frequently inaccurate, in certain cases, where there can be no purpose to deceive and the story fits with the article, it is wrong to entirely dismiss what one is told.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is brown/bright with old nicks in cutting edge from possible battle use. Iron hilt and scabbard exhibit dark patina, old paint, and pitting. Leather grips are intact, but shrunken and cracked. 4-31320 JS4 (500-800)

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1178

CONFEDERATE STATES NAVAL CUTLASS. This is the most popular and the most classic example of Confederate naval cutlasses. This sword exhibits a 21″ blade with a central ridge line and cast brass hilt with feathered grip, which has a cast “CSN” and fluted anchor in the pommel. Hilt also has large, crudely cut Roman numerals “II” and “VI” cut inside basket. This sword originally was in the collection of Ralph Arnold. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate States navy cutlass. This cutlass is probably the finest example of this weapon in existence. The full length, 21” blade shows only manufacturing flaws in the metal. The hilt is in flawless condition with “CSN” cast into the pommel cap. When found, the scabbard had disintegrated into fragments (probably thereby preserving the blade, but still attached was the original canvas and leather frog for the scabbard. Provenance: Ex. coll. Ralph Arnold.”The frog mentioned here is being sold as Lot #1191. CONDITION: This example is about as fine as can be expected. Blade exhibits orig polish and scattered, laminated flaws. 4-31396 JS8 (4,000-6,000)

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1179

CONFEDERATE SHORT ARTILLERY SWORD. 18-1/4″ dbl-edged blade. Cast hilt with concentric rings. These swords are thought to have been made in Macon, Georgia. Similar swords marked “E. J. Johnston” have very similar hilts. This particular unmarked example has good patina to hilt and blade. PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Blade is brown with pitting, old sharpening, and grinding marks. Hilt exhibits rich patina. 4-31474 JS12 (1,500-2,000)

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1181

CONFEDERATE CARTRIDGE BOX, CAP BOX ON ORIGINAL ROLLER BUCKLE BELT. This complete outfit for a Confederate rifleman is remarkable, quite unique for its completeness and totally untouched “attic” condition. Mounted onto a roller buckle belt, this originated in North Carolina many years ago, and we doubt a better one has ever surfaced. Cartridge box and cap box have classic Confederate features, including lead finials, rough hewn, sewn leather bodies, Cap box and cartridge box are clearly of the same manufacturer, having been made of the same gauge of leather, with the same sewing skills and same finish to leather edges. Cap box is in remarkable condition, still retaining the orig lamb’s wool. Cap box has classic single loop, and the cartridge box has the classic sewn double-loops, with no provision for over-the-shoulder strap. Cartridge box is fitted with a single tin which still exhibits most of its orig finish. Cartridge box also has about a 1″ maker’s cartouche with large letters “A.F.” stamped in lower left hand quadrant of front flap. Belt also is in excellent condition, having a forged roller buckle sewn onto the tongue of the belt. This is a remarkable rig that we doubt could ever be duplicated or upgraded. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This complete outfit for a Confederate rifleman is remarkable, quite possibly unique for its completeness and its totally untouched condition. Mounted on the original belt with roller buckle are the matching cartridge box and cap box, both clearly of Confederate manufacture. The finial of each is made of lead and the dark rust brown leather is almost 3/8” thick. The cartridge box has only belt loops for a waist belt and no provision for an over-the-shoulder sling to be attached. The simply made belt with roller buckle is also as classic a Confederate infantryman’s belt as any could be.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel CONDITION: All leather is very sound. Surfaces on all pieces have mottling, some flaking, and are scuffed at high areas. Tabs on both boxes are worn and a bit fragile, but sound and still attached. 4-31421 JS42 (10,000-15,000)

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1182

MORSE CARBINE CARTRIDGE BOXES AND BELT. This is a very rarely encountered rig. No more than a handful of orig Morse cartridge box belts & cartridge boxes survive. Consists of 2 cartridge boxes, about 11″ x 4″ each, each holding 12 tin tubes. Each tube would have held a Morse cartridge. The 2 boxes are suspended on a canvas belt, by pairs of brass belt loops. Belt is in very good condition overall, being complete with leather end and roller buckle. Leather tab at other end is complete. Cartridge boxes have tarred flaps. One box appears complete with all 12 compartments sealed with their tin tubes. This box contains both tabs. The second box retains all 12 tubes; however, the leather compartments in this box have much deterioration and 5 or 6 of the tin tubes are loose. This box has one complete tab, and one is broken off. Regardless, this is a spectacular belt and set of boxes. We have offered one set a few years ago, but the condition on this set is superior. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “The Morse carbines were issued with a unique pair of cartridge boxes. Each box, made of leather, holds twelve tin tubes in twelve loop pockets. The two boxes are suspended on a web belt by pairs of brass loops. Rare, to say the least, this set is one found in a crate marked for “20 Morse’s carbines improved”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Belt is sound and complete, though canvas belt is soiled. Leather retaining roller buckle is sound and complete. Leather tongue is complete and sound with crazing and mottling and scuffing. Leather surfaces on belt retain most of their orig surfaces. Both boxes exhibit crazing and mottling of surfaces with scuffing and chipping, especially on back of the lesser conditioned box. Interior of the lesser conditioned box is flaking, and much of the leather covering of the tin tubes is very fragile. Coverings for two of the tin tubes is totally missing, though all tin tubes are intact and present. 4-31346 JS44 (5,000-10,000)

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1183

CONFEDERATE CARTRIDGE BOX WITH LINEN SLING. This is the classic Confederate Infantryman’s rig. Box is made of thick, russet leather with no belt loops. There is provision only for over-the-shoulder linen strap which has been cross-stitched to strengthen the doubled-over fabric. Cartridge box closes on a lead finial. Cartridge box on this sling has the left corner of the outermost flap of box upturned. Paul Johnson, in his book on Civil War cartridge boxes, notes that this is frequently observed in contemporary photographs. This was apparently done deliberately by soldiers for ease of access to the cartridges inside. A set of 3/4-inch initials, “JHC”, are scratched into top of flap on face of cartridge box, indicating the soldier who carried this box. Sling, though soiled and showing use, is quite sound and will support this box for display. Sling, however, is missing portions of both sewn, leather ends, one being almost totally gone, the second missing the end that attached to buckle on box. Cartridge box is missing both roller buckles, but leather tabs to secure them, though torn, are mostly intact. Box is missing its tin cartridge compartment. This brown leather box is quite sound and displays beautifully on its strap. Finding orig Confederate cartridge boxes on their orig linen slings is a difficult undertaking, and you will not find a much more presentable rig as this. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Russet brown leather Confederate cartridge box with linen sling. This is the classic Confederate infantryman’s rig. The box is thick rust leather with no waist belt loops on the reverse. There is provision only for the over-the-shoulder linen sling which has been cross-stitched to strengthen the doubled-over fabric. The box finial is of lead as frequently found to avoid the unnecessary use of brass where a substitute metal was available. Interestingly, the left corner of the outer flap of the box is upturned as noted in Paul D. Johnson’s book on Civil War cartridge boxes to be frequently observed in contemporary photographs. This was apparently done deliberately by the soldiers for ease of access to the cartridges inside.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Strap is missing most of one leather tab and the other is broken. Linen is mostly complete, having several tears, reinforcing thread loose and torn in areas. An area about 1-1/2″ x 3/4″ is missing is center of strap, near where it was probably hung from a nail. There are rust stains in that area. Cartridge box is sound and dry. Cartridge box is complete with exception of missing tin and roller buckles. Box surface exhibits some crazing and cracking, but most of orig surface is present. 4-31420 JS43 (5,000-7,000)

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1184

“CS” EMBOSSED CONFEDERATE CAP BOX. Among the rarest and most desirable of Confederate cap boxes are the boxes embossed “CS”. Box is the classic Confederate cap box, with single belt loop, lead finial, and “CS” embossed in a 1-1/4″ x 1″ cartouche on face of box. These embossed boxes are quite rare and rarely offered. The “CS” embossing on this box is very clear and untouched. Box retains inner flap and lamb’s wool. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “While unquestionably all Confederate leather goods are rare, most rare of these are the ones marked either with a maker’s name or, in this case, with the classic “CS” in an oval. Typical Confederate construction with a small rear loop for placement on the soldier’s belt and the classic lead finial, this cap box is also clearly embossed on the front flap with the letters “CS” in an oval.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Box is sound and solid; however, front flap shows edge deterioration, missing a portion of front flap, as can be seen in photos. Tab is fragile and has an old, sewn repair. Belt loop is fragile with several large cracks and tears but is mostly complete. 4-31424 JS47 (5,000-8,000)

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1185

“GETTYSBURG BATTLEFIELD” CONFEDERATE CAP BOX. Classic Confederate brown leather cap box retains old tag stating it was picked up on the battlefield of Gettysburg. Tag reads, “This cartridge box was picked by father on the battlefield of Gettysburg a few days after the battle, Theodore K. Long”. This classic cap box retains its large single belt loop, long brass finial, and its orig vent prick. Mr. Michel in his notes states, “Except for its color, a rich brown, this cap box would appear to be US issue rather than Confederate made. The finial brass is rather than lead, but the construction, including the wide single belt loop, identifies it with its origin, south and not north of the Mason-Dixon line”. CONDITION: Box is solid and complete. Surfaces are good with some scuffing at high areas. Crazing is visible at folds. 4-31425 JS49 (2,000-3,000)

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1186

CONFEDERATE CAP BOX. This classic, single-strap, Confederate cap box, according to Mr. Michel’s notes, is a little larger than usual, and there are features of this cap box which cause it to resemble the English cap boxes furnished with imported Enfields. The finial has had the point visibly and deliberately cut off. Apparently this was done contemporaneously with its use, undoubtedly like the habit of turning up the flap on cartridge boxes for the ease and access. CONDITION: Surfaces of box are good and solid, with some crazing and mottling. Most orig surface is present. Box is a bit compressed with one ear coming loose from inner flap but still partially attached. Tab is complete and solid. Remnants of wool are still present. 4-31422 JS45 (800-1,200)

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1187

CONFEDERATE CAP BOX. A classic Confederate cap box made with single belt loop, lead finial, and no inner flap. Box still retains its orig vent prick. Box is in as fine condition as you will find. Surfaces are excellent, and sewing is tight and complete. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “A classic Confederate cap box of thick leather, a single wide belt loop, and lead finial.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Solid and complete. Smooth surfaces with minor cracking and crazing, especially at folds. 4-31426 JS48 (1,200-1,800)

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1188

CONFEDERATE CAP BOX. This is quite the unusual Confederate cap box. It is very simply made with the front flap acting as a tab over a lead finial placed on the front bottom of this box. Box has no inner flap and is made of very thin leather. Due to the fact that there is no inner flap and more stress at the back fold, the stitching is reinforced with two brass pins. Box overall is in fine condition for a piece of Confederate leather, being complete and sound with good surfaces throughout. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states, “This box follows the pattern of pre-War cap boxes which had the finial placed on the front of the interior pouch as opposed to the more usual bottom placement. The finial here is lead. The leather is a russet brown color, and the small belt loop is stitched integral with the edge stitching of the box—all features common to confederate manufactured cap box”. CONDITION: Leather is complete, sound, and supple. Orig surfaces have scattered bends, folds, and mottling. 4-31423 JS46 (1,200-1,800)

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1189

CONFEDERATE TREDEGAR BAYONET SCABBARD AND FROG. This very rare Confederate scabbard for a Tredegar socket bayonet is all hand-stitched with a lead finial tied to bottom of scabbard. These lead scabbard tips are very commonly found on battlefields, especially in the Army of Northern Virginia sites. We would imagine there are no more than a handful of these scabbards known. We can think of only 6 or 7 in collections and institutions. These scabbards are among the rarest of Confederate-associated accouterments. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “This very rare Confederate scabbard for a socket bayonet is all hand stitched with a lead finial sewn to the tip as an endpiece. While the leather body is flaking in places and the belt loop is fragile, it is in overall sound condition and, considering the great rarity of this particular accoutrement, it is in very good condition.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Scabbard body is sound with much of its orig black surface remaining. Frog is fragile but intact with several tears. 4-31427 JS40 (1,000-2,000)

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1190

CONFEDERATE TREDEGAR SOCKET BAYONET SCABBARD AND FROG. This is another example of the very rare Confederate angular bayonet scabbard. It is all hand-stitched and in very good condition overall, with exception of its broken tip, which at one time had a lead finial. This scabbard retains much of its orig black surface with only minor crazing and loss of finish. Frog is very good, though dry. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Perhaps the rarest Confederate leather accoutrement is the scabbard for the socket bayonet. Having no civilian use, thse few that survive only do so because some veteran saw it as an appropriate souvenir if otherwise lacking the appeal of a cartridge or cap box, much less a Bowie knife or canteen. This example is of heavy leather and shows no sign of ever having a trip unless it was a simple lead finial sewn into the leather. Most likely the body of the scabbard was simply sewn down to the end.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Overall, surfaces are dry. Black surface is flaking but mostly intact. Tip of scabbard is broken off. 4-31428 JS41 (1,000-2,000)

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1191

FROG FOR CONFEDERATE NAVAL CUTLASS. Rarely found is the orig canvas and leather frog that normally accompanied the classic Confederate naval cutlass that exhibited CSN and fluted anchor pommel. There are a good many orig scabbards out there but few frogs. If you have a naval cutlass with its orig scabbard, here’s a chance to buy the rarest accessory to go with it. PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Canvas is sound with several tears. A 1″ cut or tear is present in the top. Leather is complete and sound, though sewing on 1/2 of one edge is missing and only about 10 or 20% of the orig black surface is present. The rest is chipped or worn off. 4-31480 JS50 (300-500)

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1192

CONFEDERATE SPURS. Nice pair of large, Confederate variant spurs with iron rowels. PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Spurs exhibit similar patinas. One rowel heavily rusted, only about 50% intact. 4-31385 JS58 (300-500)

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1193

CS ROPE BORDER BUCKLE ON BELT This is a fine example of the classic “CS Rope Border” buckle on its orig brown, leather belt. This buckle is similar to Fig. 270 in Kerksis. Excavated specimens of this buckle are found at Shiloh, Port Hudson, Vicksburg, and all through the Atlanta campaign. This was a popular buckle in the Western armies, and non-dug specimens are scarce, especially as nice as this one. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “”Rope border” Confederate “CS” belt plate of stamped brass with twisted rope design encircling its inner border.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Buckle is well-struck, having only minor nicks and scratches. Hooks are very good and complete. Brown leather belt is dry. 4-31405 JS33 (6,000-8,000)

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1194

ENLISTED CONFEDERATE CS BUCKLE & BELT This buckle is the classic, lead-filled, CS egg, similar to Kerksis’ Fig. 273. This particular buckle is in very good condition with full lead and hooks on reverse. Soldier scratched his initials “SRS” into back of plate, along with other, indiscernible writing. This is a scarce variety of buckle associated with the Army of Northern Virginia. The belt this buckle is on originally had a buckle with “puppy paw” hooks, but this buckle has been with this belt a long time and displays nicely with it. It would be difficult to find a better specimen of this buckle. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Stamped copper with wire hooks held by lead or solder filling. Oval in shape with “CS”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection.` CONDITION: Buckle exhibits several small dents, scratches, and small bends at top and right side. 4-31408 JS31 (6,000-8,000)

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1195

CONFEDERATE OVAL ENLISTED BELT & BUCKLE. This is a classic example of the CS egg which is most commonly excavated in very early sites around Mobile and Pensacola campsites and early Western Theatre battlefields. This buckle, though very commonly excavated, is quite scarce non-dug, especially on its original belt. This buckle is similar to Fig. 272 in Kerksis’ book Plates and Buckles of the American Military. This buckle was made by simple soldering a set of iron hooks to the stamped brass face. These buckles are often poorly stamped. This example has a very good, clear “CS”. This belt and buckle are guaranteed authentic and original in every regard. This is a fine example of a difficult plate to find non-excavated. It would be difficult to upgrade this plate on its orig belt. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Stamped brass with wire hooks held by light solder or lead filling. Oval in shape with “CS”.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Buckle exhibits numerous small scratches in face. Belt is flaking and has areas of insect damage, but is still sound and solid. 4-31404 JS32 (6,000-8,000)

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1196

CSA RECTANGULAR BELT PLATE ON BELT. This is as fine an example as you will find of the classic “Atlanta pattern” C.S.A. belt plate. Georgia, or Atlanta pattern CSAs are generally thicker than their eastern counterparts and have smaller periods. This example has both these features plus has highly-detailed “C.S.A.” lettering. It would be difficult to obtain a better CSA rectangular belt plate on its orig brown belt. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “”Atlanta Arsenal”-type Confederate “CSA” belt plate.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Buckle is slightly bent but exhibits fine mustard patina. Brown belt is dry but sound. 4-31406 JS34 (6,000-8,000)

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1197

CS BRECKENRIDGE BELT PLATE ON BROWN BELT. This buckle is similar to Kerksis’ Fig. 277 or 278. This is a very scarce, non-excavated plate. Hooks on this buckle appear re-soldered, and one hook appears replaced. Belt was orig for a “puppy paw” style buckle. Regardless of the reattached hooks and replacement belt, this is a very scarce buckle in non-excavated condition. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “”Regulation CS” belt plate of stamped brass and soldered flat belt hooks.” CONDITION: Surface of plate exhibits numerous small dents and scratches and old cleaning. Belt is crazed, but sound and solid. 4-31407 JS35 (5,000-7,000)

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1198

CLIP CORNER CS BUCKLE ON BELT. This is the classic CS clip corner buckle commonly found in Confederate cavalry sites in the Western Theater. Sid Kerksis, in his reference book, states in his opinion, “It is one of the most attractive of the belt buckles fabricated by the Confederate central government.” He states, “There is reason to believe they were possibly manufactured in Columbus, Georgia. They are well-made and finished and have a black enamel background,” which is present on this example. This buckle shows the typical “spinning marks” always seen on this particular type of CS clip corner buckle. It would be difficult to find a nicer example of this popular Confederate buckle. The accompanying belt does not appear orig to this buckle, but this buckle displays very nicely on it. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “”Line in Hooks” case brass belt plate of heavy casting, integral belt hooks.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Buckle is very good overall, exhibiting fine patina and strong traces of orig background enamel. Belt has been cut, broken, and repaired. 4-31409 JS36 (3,500-4,500)

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1199

CAST BRASS OVAL BELT PLATE ON BELT. This plain, cast brass, oval plate was probably made prior to the American Civil War. These plates are often seen with various engraved motifs. The Confederates, utilizing whatever they could, used plates and buckles like this, based on excavated finds of similar buckles. This buckle appears to be on its orig belt, missing the sewn belt keeper. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Oval cast brass with flat, oval belt pins and belt hook on belt.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Buckle is very good, with scattered stains and scratches overall. Belt is solid, has minor crazing, and some insect damage. 4-31412 JS37 (500-1,000)

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1200

RECTANGULAR CS SABER BELT PLATE. This buckle, 1-3/4″ high x 2-1/4″ long, is most unusual. We believe this buckle to be Veteran’s era; however, since this buckle was cataloged by the Chicago Historical Society in 1917, it is possibly wartime. We have not seen another plate exactly like this. Buckle has a keeper with it, though it does not fit perfectly. Buckle appears sand cast with a cast “W” in back along with an old catalog number in black ink. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states, “Confederate rectangular sword belt plate with cast CS inside edge frame. This plate comes from the Gunther collection disbursed by the Chicago Historical Society. The back of the plate has ink accession number 1917.32. This type plate is pictured by Sydney C. Kerksis in his book Plates and Buckles of the American Military, 1795-1874 on pages 303-304. Described by Kerksis as ‘quite rare,’ both plates shown are from the Virginia Historical Society collection.” Buckle shows wear with numerous small scratches to face. CONDITION: As described above in description. 4-31419 JS63 (400-800)

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1201

CONFEDERATE GEORGIA FRAME BUCKLE. This frame buckle, which is 2-3/4″ x 2-1/2″, is one of the numerous varieties and styles of frame buckles utilized by both Eastern and Western Confederate armies. These buckles, though common excavated, are quite scarce unexcavated, as this one is. This buckle displays quite nicely on a reproduction belt made specifically for it. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “On reproduction belt.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Buckle has been cleaned overall. Still retains patina in protected areas, especially inside the numerous dings, dents, and scratches. 4-31410 JS38 (750-1,500)

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1202

CONFEDERATE “FORKED TONGUE” BUCKLE. This buckle measures 3-3/4″ x just over 2-1/2″. This is one of the numerous varieties of this particular plate used by both Eastern and Western Confederate armies. These buckles are commonly excavated on battlefields and campsites in all theaters of war, often with missing or broken tongues. This particular specimen is excavated also and highly cleaned and put on a reproduction belt to show how it was worn. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “On reproduction belt.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Buckle exhibits several bends to body and to tongue. Reproduction belt is wearable and sound. 4-31411 JS39 (500-1,000)

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1203

CONFEDERATE CEDAR WOOD CANTEEN RECOVERED AT THE BATTLEFIELD OF CEDAR MOUNTAIN, VIRGINIA. This canteen was taken from the body of a NC soldier who died on the battlefield. His name, “W. D. Redfern” is nicely scratched into surface of canteen. Attached tag tells the story, “This canteen was taken from the body of a captain of a Confederate N. C. Regiment who was killed at the Battle of Cedar Mountain, presented to W. E. Rogers by the Sheriff of Culpepper Co.”. Canteen retains a thin linen sling. Mr. Michel tells the story of this canteen as follows: “Typical Confederate wood canteen with linen sling. When found, this canteen had an old paper pasted on the side reading, ‘This canteen was taken from the body of a Captain of a Confederate N. C. Regiment who was killed at the battle of Cedar Mountain. Presented to W. E. Rogers by the Sheriff of Culpepper Co.’ At the edge of the paper the initials W. D. R. were visible carved on the canteen. When the paper was removed intact the full name Redfern appeared formerly covered by the paper. W. D. Redfern was 1st Lt of Co A of the 23rd Reg of NC Inf when he died on May 10, 1862. Interestingly his rank was probably mistaken by the person who took the canteen from his body because his two bar collar insignia, designating him as a 1st Lt in Confederate service could have been taken for the two bar designation of a caption in the U.S. service”. This is a rare opportunity to buy a battlefield recovered relic with such wonderful provenance. CONDITION: Canteen appears to be an “attic” find. Surfaces are well patinated, including iron banding and wood. Wood is light where tag was removed. A mouse made a home in this canteen, as can be seen by the gnawing marks around spout. This is not the first canteen we have seen that a mouse made as his home. Sling has two areas of newer sewing. 4-31418 JS57 (5,000-8,000)

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1204

DECORATED CONFEDERATE WOOD CANTEEN. This is a classic 7″ cedar wood canteen, commonly used by both Army of TN and Army of N.VA. Canteen has a wonderful, commemorative painting, described by Mr. Michel as follows: “Confederate wood canteen painted with crossed Confederate flags. On the right is the first national pattern with a field of red, white, and red stripes and a canton with the St. Andrew’s cross, and on the left is the second national pattern with a white field and (albeit incorrectly) also a St. Andrew’s cross. Both flags are surmounted with the letters ‘C.S.A.'”. CONDITION: Canteen is no longer perfectly round. It may never have been. One of the 1-1/2″ wood slats is missing and is replaced. Bands are loose. Numerous scratches and nicks. Painted decoration is partially obscured by scuffs and wear. 4-31416 JS55 (2,000-4,000)

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1205

CONFEDERATE CEDAR WOOD CANTEEN. This is a variant of the classic Confederate cedar wood canteen. This variant is banded with brass bands instead of iron and has a wonderful, orig, leather strap which holds a forged snap hook that would attach this to a knapsack or saddle. Canteen also is nicely identified to a soldier from Perry County, AL. Mr. Michel notes explain this AL soldier’s history as follows: “Confederate wood canteen with leather belt and hook closure. Side of canteen is engraved, ‘S. Nichols Perry Co. Ala.’ Nichols enlisted on Oct 30, 1863, at Selma, AL. He was a Sgt in Cpt Sengstak’s company, 2nd Battalion, AL Lt Art. On Feb. 20, 1865, he was in the Way Hospital at Meridian, MS, with a wound and was furloughed”. CONDITION: Canteen appears to be an “attic” find with nice patina to brass and wood surfaces. Large age crack in both plates of the canteen. Obverse face of canteen also has a 2″ chip at base. Leather strap is complete and solid. Leather strap is constructed with 2 layers of leather. Outside layer is solid and complete. Inner layer has numerous cracks and breaks, especially at folds. 4-31417 JS56 (4,000-6,000)

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1206

CONFEDERATE TIN CANTEEN. This is a very rare, decorated, souvenir Confederate tin canteen in wonderful condition. Reverse of canteen clearly shows a large bayonet hole. Was this bayonet hole made in battle, or did some Union soldier just render this canteen unusable for the next Confederate to find it on the battlefield? Mr. Michel, in his notes, describes this canteen quite well as follows: “Confederate tin canteen with old silver paint and black stylistic paint inscription on the side, clearly of the period, ‘A relic of the Civil War 1860 worn by a Rebel Private’ with other decorative lining. This is typical of the type of ‘captured’ or battlefield souvenir items displayed at the sanitary fairs during the war and at small local museums in the postwar period”. CONDITION: Paint on canteen is very good with some chipping and paint reduction on sides, scattered rust and pitting. 4-31413 JS52 (4,000-6,000)

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1207

CONFEDERATE TIN CANTEEN. This 6-1/4″ Confederate tin canteen is a scarce variant, rarely seen, with raised edges on both surfaces. Canteen exhibits its orig linen sling attached with roller buckle. We have seen no more than 2 or 3 of this pattern canteen, and this particular example would be very difficult if not impossible to upgrade, especially on this wonderful, Confederate-made, linen sling with roller buckle. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate tin canteen with original canvas sling with iron roller buckle.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Canteen is solid with several dents, scattered rust. Sling is solid, missing several inches of its end, and is heavily soiled. 4-31415 JS54 (3,000-5,000)

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1208

CONFEDERATE TIN CANTEEN WITH ORIGINAL COVER AND SLING. This 6-1/2″ x 1-3/4″ canteen is one of many variants of tin canteens used during the Civil War. This canteen is as complete as you will find. Mr. Michel, in his notes, sums it up as follows: “Confederate tin canteen with ‘butternut’ color cloth cover and linen sling. If Confederate canteens are not readily found today, they are almost never found with the original cloth cover still intact, and then still more rarely with the original sling”. CONDITION: Canteen has several dents. Exposed surfaces are smooth with some rust and pitting. Butternut cover is complete with some minor moth damage and heavily soiled. Sling is fragile and has several tears but is sound and will support canteen with no fear of breaking. 4-31414 JS53 (3,000-5,000)

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1209

CONFEDERATE FLAP HOLSTER. This holster is possibly a Confederate copy of a U.S. military holster for a Navy-sized revolver such as a Griswold or Leech & Rigdon. Holster is simply made by sewing one edge to the muzzle. Muzzle plug is also sewn into place, which is now partially detached. Flap is closed by an odd-shaped, brass finial. Belt loop is quite small, being just over 5/8″ wide, attached with 2 brass rivets. Regardless of who made this holster, it would make a nice display with any Confederate revolver of its size. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Thin, leather, hand-sewn holster with brass finial to hold top flap. Single narrow belt loop held by a single rivet.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Leather is supple. Stitching is still complete, except at muzzle where plug has broken loose but is still partially attached. Leather surfaces are well worn and flaking, especially at folds. Black surfaces are flaking, mottled, and crazed. 4-31365 JS91 (1,000-2,000)

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1210

CONFEDERATE-USED HOLSTER Standard military-style Navy-sized holster. Belt loop is attached with 2 copper rivets. Finial is a furniture tack, sometimes seen on Confederate cartridge boxes and accouterments. Mr. Michel’s notes state the following: “Dark brown leather holster with flap held by copper finial. Single wide belt loop secured with 2 copper rivets. When found, the holster held a Griswold & Gunnison revolver, since separated. The holster has secured to the back an old label reading o’Griswold & Grier Confederate’ as these revolvers were once known.” Finding Confederate holsters that are truly associated with Confederate handguns is difficult. This is a nice, usable, displayable holster that could be used with any Griswold or Iron Frame Navy revolver. CONDITION: Solid and supple. Several small cracks and tears at folds. Belt loop is solid. Plug at muzzle is broken, and only about 50% present. Surfaces are crazed and mottled. Black surface is almost completely intact. Brass finial and rivets are nicely patinated. 4-31364 JS89 (1,000-2,000)

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1211

CIVIL WAR ERA OPEN TOP HOLSTER. This is a typical “Slim Jim” holster for a Navy-sized revolver with opened muzzle end. Well-made holster sewn along one edge. Single belt loop is retained by 3 brass rivets. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Russet brown leather holster, hand stitched with a wide single belt loop secured by a single rivet.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Thread is broken at about 1/2 of sewn edge length. Leather surfaces are sound, but black coating is cracked and crazed, and much has worn off or chipped away. 4-31366 JS90 (300-500)

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1212

OPEN TOP HOLSTER. This classic “Slim Jim” holster would hold an army or navy pistol, simply sewn along one edge with no provision at muzzle. Belt loop is attached with 2 iron rivets. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Heavy leather holster for a Navy-type revolver, hand stitched with a single belt loop, also of thick leather, secured by a single rivet.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Supple with areas of mildew staining, especially inside. 4-31367 JS92 (100-200)

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1213

PAIR OF SADDLE HOLSTERS FOR LARGE REVOLVERS. Colt Dragoons or even Dance Army revolvers would fit nicely in these patent leather-covered pommel holsters with large, brass tips. Holsters are complete with covers and tabs that attach to brass finials. PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: These holsters have seen some use. Several areas of covers are torn and worn through; however, they are still solid and will display nicely on saddle. Much of orig surface is still present. Bodies of holsters exhibit several cracks, but holsters are intact. 4-31384 JS93 (500-800)

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1214

PAIR OF SADDLE HOLSTERS. These holsters appear to date from the early-to-mid 19th century and would contain any American martial pistols made in the 1820s, 30s, and 40s. Holsters have large, formed single flaps with tabs that attach to large brass finials above large, protective brass caps with floral decorations on base. PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Brass base caps originally attached by brass pins or wire. Pins or wire are missing. Holsters are complete, as are flaps. Surfaces retain most of their orig black finish, with some crazing and mottling, especially at folds and on the piece of leather that connects the holsters. Rich red/brown patina to protective caps. 4-31383 JS94 (1,000-2,000)

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1215

CONFEDERATE MAPLE DRUM. This drum, 12″ high x 14″ in diameter, is typical of snare drums used by both sides during the Civil War. Drum has repainted red hoops, maple body with numerous defects, not typical of a drum for civilian or Northern military use. This drum has tag opposite vent from the restorer which reads: “Repaired and restored / by / W. H. Reamer / January 1988 / Broomall, PA”. Drum is accompanied by pair of period drumsticks. Mr. Michel, in his notes, states, “Drum was found in southern New Jersey and it came from an old GAR post as a ‘rebel drum’. At one time there was a tag to that effect which has since been lost”. CONDITION: 4-31461 JS62 (1,000-2,000)

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1216

COOK & BROTHER TWO-DOLLAR BILL. On yellow paper, a 6-1/2″ x 2-3/4″ two-dollar bill issued by Cook & Brother, New Orleans. Note is serial numbered, dated March 15, 1862, and signed “Cook & Brother”. Vignettes include 2 crossed rifles, sailing ship, plow, etc. Note has green overprinted “TWO”. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Cook & Brother two-dollar note payable at New Orleans, March 15, 1862.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31297 JS51 (300-500)

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1217

PAIR OF ASHTRAYS MADE FROM 12-POUND CANNONBALLS. 2 ceramic bases have approx. 1/2 to 2/3 of exploded 12-pound Boreman shells securely attached. Area where the Boreman fuse went is clearly visible. Both shell fragments were excavated at unknown battle site and are deeply pitted and rusted as typical of battlefield recovered shell fragments. PROVENANCE: Ben Michel CONDITION: 4-31477 JS64 (100-200)

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1218

GREAT SEAL OF THE CONFEDERACY. Highly detailed 3-1/2″ impression of the Great Seal of the Confederacy, possibly an electrotype made directly on the seal, then lead filled. Seal is presented in its orig box. Box is imprinted “Manufactured and for sale by R. M. Cheshire, 716 8th Street, NE, Washington D.C”. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “The seal, which is a lead-filled bronze impression, is in its original green paper box with velvet lining. The book has a picture on it of the seal and the notation that it was “Manufactured and for sale by R. M. Cheshire, 716 Eighth Street Northwest, Washington D.C.”” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Seal exhibits some orig luster, some minor scuffing, and pleasant patina overall. Orig cardboard box is separated with tears and missing some of its green paper covering. 4-31458 JS67 (500-800)

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1219

STONEWALL JACKSON MEDAL. White metal medallion is approx. 2″ and shows the bust of Stonewall Jackson on one side, and reverse has patriotic motifs listing battles he was involved in. These medals were made in France during the Civil War and were supposed to be given to members of the Stonewall Jackson Brigade, though distribution did not occur. These medals were sold after the Civil War, usually encased in a glass-shielded bezel. For more information on this medal, the Token and Medal Society newsletter published an article on these several years ago. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Bronze medal with portrait head of Stonewall Jackson on one side and a listing of his battles on the reverse.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Still retains some orig luster, numerous small nicks and scratches on high areas. 4-31457 JS65 (200-400)

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1220

CONFEDERATE SOUTHERN CROSS OF HONOR. The Southern Cross of Honor as pictured here was made by Charles Crankshaw of Atlanta in the late 19th century. The United Daughters of the Confederacy gave these medals to any Confederate soldier who was honorably discharged or surrendered with his army or died during the Civil War. These medals were not issued named, and it was up to the soldier to have a jeweler inscribe or scratch his name himself into the name bar. “R. W. Jenkins” inscribed his name quite nicely. R. W. Jenkins appears on the rolls of the 6th and 8th South Carolina Infantry as Sgt and later Lt. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Confederate veteran’s medal presented to veterans by the United Daughters of the Confederacy. The nameplate is scratched with the name “R. W. Jenkins”. At one time these medals were so precious to the veterans and their families they were virtually unobtainable.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Medal is in “as found” condition with pleasant patina on all surfaces. 4-31456 JS66 (500-1,000)

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1221

WOODEN BOX POSSIBLY FOR CONFEDERATE AMMUNITION. 14-1/2″ x 9″ x 8-1/2″ wooden, hinged box made in the style of arsenal ammunition boxes. Box is hinged and well made of nailed construction. Box is totally devoid of any markings. If this box was used for ammunition, it would have at one time been painted with the type of munitions it held. An integral lock is present on front of box and a keyhole is present on front face of wood. Key is no longer present. Several repairs have been made to this box so it could continue to be used for some utilitarian purpose. PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: 4-31438 JS61 (200-400)

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1222

CONFEDERATE VETERAN’S CANE. 35″ long cane, with top 15″ decorated with tacks, hearts, and moons cut out of brass, with the most interesting device being the “CS” medallion from a 2-pc “CS” sword belt plate surrounded by 2 letter “I’s”, possibly representing “Infantry”. There is no date or ID on this cane, but it appears typical of similar pieces of folk art from the late 19th century. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Walking stick wonderfully decorated with tacks and twine wrapping and, most notably, what appears to have been the center oval brass “CS” of a two-piece plate with a silver letter “I” inlet on each side.” PROVENANCE: Ben Michel collection. CONDITION: Cane has seen some use but is solid and sturdy. String wrap is soiled but complete. Several tacks and inlays are missing. 4-31459 JS60 (500-800)

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1223

LARGE 19TH CENTURY WATERCOLOR OF A CONFEDERATE SOLDIER. This approx. 22” x 16” watercolor on paper appears 19th century and possibly Civil War. Bearded enlisted man in uniform is shown pictured in front of fort with tents in background. Frame, backing, and glass are replaced, though frame appears contemporary to watercolor. SIZE: 22″ x 16″ CONDITION: Very good overall. 4-31479 JS237 (200-400)

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1224

LARGE FRAMED ENGRAVING OF ROBERT E. LEE FROM THE HOME OF A UNION GENERAL. This approx. 15” x 11” image of Robert E. Lee, according to notes on back of frame, was from the home of Gen. John Parkhurst, once Colonel of the 9th Michigan, later Brig. General. Even Union officers revered the great Robert E. Lee. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “From home of John C. Parkhurst, Col, 9th Michigan & Brig. General, Army of the Cumberland.” SIZE: 15″ x 11″ CONDITION: Overall very good, with a couple light creases seen in paper of image. 4-31478 JS236 (200-400)

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1225

ORIGINAL OIL PAINTING BY DICK RICHARDSON OF TWO CONFEDERATE CAVALRYMEN ELUDING THE ENEMY IN THE SNOW. This well executed oil on board shows two cavalrymen being chased by the Yankees. One Confederate cavalryman is returning fire with his revolver. This undated painting is signed “Dick Richardson”. CONDITION: Very good overall. 4-31471 JS235 (300-500)

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1226

ORIGINAL OIL PAINTING OF CONFEDERATE ARTILLERY TEAM AT FULL GALLOP BY DICK RICHARDSON. This undated oil on board painting, signed “Dick Richardson”, is approx. 15” x 11” and shows Confederate artillerymen on their way to a fight. SIZE: 15″ x 11″ CONDITION: Very good overall. 4-31470 JS234 (300-500)

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1227

WATERCOLOR OF CONFEDERATE CAVALRYMAN WITH TARPLEY CARBINE. This approx. 14” x 10” watercolor signed “Sowers, 81” shows a Virginia cavalryman with a Carolina-made cavalry saber and a North Carolina-made Tarpley carbine. This horseman is wearing regulation cavalry boots, a sword belt with Virginia buckle, shell jacket and slouch hat. SIZE: 14″ x 10″ CONDITION: Image overall is very good with light fading. 4-31468 JS233 (300-500)

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1228

FRAMED NEEDLEPOINT OF THREE CONFEDERATE FLAGS. This well executed needlepoint of three Confederate variant flags is thought to be close to 100 years old and is beautifully framed in gilt inset walnut frame. Mr. Michel’s Notes State: “Beautifully executed needlepoint of three Confederate flags (two nationals and the battle flag) in handsome, antique, walnut frame with gilt insert. Work appears to be late 19th century or early 20th century.” SIZE: 14″ x 17″ CONDITION: Overall very good. 4-31460 JS273 (200-400)

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1229

GREAT SEAL OF THE CONFEDERACY. This 24” square reproduction of the Great Seal of the Confederacy was published by the Museum of the Confederacy in 1987. SIZE: 24″ x 24″ CONDITION: Very good overall. 4-31467 JS242 (200-400)

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1230

LIMITED EDITION PRINT OF “EMBLEMS OF VALOR” BY DON TROIANI. This unframed print is signed and numbered. Image size is approx. 24” x 20”. Accompanied by a document of authenticity from the publisher. SIZE: 24″ x 20″ CONDITION: Very good overall with a couple dents at corners. 4-31466 JS241 (200-400)

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1231

LIMITED EDITION PRINT OF “CONFEDERATE STANDARD BEARER” BY DON TROIANI. Framed and matted. Image size is approx. 16” x 20”. This print is one of Troiani’s first, most popular, and difficult to obtain editions. Signed, numbered and dated 1982. SIZE: 16″ x 20″ CONDITION: Very good overall, with light fading. 4-31464 JS240 (300-500)

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1232

LIMITED EDITION PRINT OF “THE GRAY WALL” BY DON TROIANI. This framed print, executed in 1985, is No. 504 of 950. Image size of this print is approx. 22” x 21”. SIZE: 22″ x 21″ CONDITION: Very good overall, with light fading. 4-31465(800-1,000)

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1233

LIMITED EDITION PRINT OF “FORWARD COLORS” BY DON TROIANI. This signed and numbered print, framed and matted, is from the orig painting dated 1983. Image size is approx. 24” x 18”. SIZE: 24″ x 18″ CONDITION: Very good overall with light fading. 4-31463 JS239 (200-400)

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1300

THE MOST IMPORTANT AMERICAN SWORD EVER TO BE OFFERED AT PUBLIC AUCTION. This represents a once in a lifetime opportunity to purchase what is considered to be, a national treasure. This solid gold, extremely high grade, presentation sword commissioned by the United States Congress, made by America’s premier blade smiths; The Ames Manufacturing Company of Chicopee, Massachusetts, and inscribed and presented to General David Emanuel Twiggs of Mexican War fame is the most important American sword in private hands and the only Mexican War Congressionally commissioned and presented sword to ever be sold at public auction. The Ames Manufacturing Company was commissioned by the United States Congress to design and fabricate this presentation sword for the phenomenal sum of $1,500 in 1848. At the time $1,500 was, without doubt, the most expensive American sword ever made by Ames and perhaps any other manufacturer of swords in the United States, or even the world. When James Ames was asked about the phenomenal cost of this sword he believed himself “fairly paid, but nothing more . . . the sword’s to be fully worth that amount.” (John Hamilton, The Ames Sword Company: 1829-1935, p. 115.) Historically, five other gold presentation swords were commissioned and presented to Mexican War heroes by Congress. One is documented to have burned in fire; three are institutionalized (one being in the White House). Only the sword to Major General William O. Butler is still family owned and was “discovered” on the Antiques Roadshow (t) in 2003. All six of these magnificent gold Congressional presentation swords were made by Ames by the same act of Congress in the same year (1848). All are distinct in design, craftsmanship and artistry. The Twiggs sword, presented here, has a spectacular history and provenance both before and during the American Civil War that is unique among all of the other Congressionally commissioned swords. This magnificent gold presentation sword is mounted with gemstones, including two large white sapphires, a topaz, and a rose-colored diamond. This sword is mounted and hilted in solid, 18-karat gold. This sword exhibits some of the finest casting art and engraving ever accomplished by any American sword manufacturer. The N.P. Ames Co. opened for business in 1791 at their factory at Chelmsford, Mass. In 1832 Nathan P. Ames signed his first contract with the U.S. Govt. for Foot Artillery swords. Ames also was the home of one of the largest brass, bronze and iron foundries in the country. They made cannon and rifled guns during the Civil War and many famous statues including the Minuteman Statue in Lexington, Mass. and the bronze doors for the U.S. Capitol. They also pioneered in plating for fine presentation swords. Noted and acclaimed throughout the world for their staff of expert bladesmiths, casters, artists, engravers and jewelers, the Ames firm made some of the finest and most beautiful American swords in history. This sword was presented to General David Emanuel Twiggs by President James K. Polk for extraordinary gallantry and service during the Mexican War. Born in Richmond County, Georgia, he was the oldest officer of the Federal Army to take up arms for the Confederacy. His father was General John Twiggs, a distinguished Revolutionary War officer referred to as the “Savior of Georgia”. Commissioned a Captain, 8th Infantry, on March 12, 1812, Twiggs fought valiantly in the War of 1812. He was promoted to Major, 28th Infantry, in 1814. Twiggs served with Generals Andrew Jackson and Edmund Gaines against the Indians in Florida during the Seminole War. He distinguished himself in the Black Hawk War and in the controversy between the United States and South Carolina in 1832. President Jackson, with whom he was a favorite, ordered him to command the U. S. Arsenal at Augusta, GA. He was commissioned Colonel, 2nd Dragoons, June 8, 1836, which, under his leadership and training, became one of the most renown cavalry regiments in the U.S. Army. Twiggs, as Colonel, 2nd Dragoons, joined General Zachary Taylor’s army at the outbreak of the Mexican War. In the movement upon the Rio Grande, Col. Twiggs led the advance and captured Point Isabel. His gallantry at the Battle of Palo Alto and Resaca-de-la-Palma resulted in a brevet promotion to Brigadier-General. At the Battle of Monterey he was in command of a division and given chief command of that place until ordered to join General Winfield Scott at Vera Cruz. At the Battle of Cerro Gordo he led the main attack, and served conspicuously at the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco. He led an assault at the Belen Gate and participated in the Assault and Capture of the City of Mexico. His actions in Mexico recognized he was honored with a brevet commission of Major- General for gallant and meritorious conduct at the Battle of Monterey and presented with this sword and a resolution by the United States Congress. Following the Mexican War Twiggs was given command of the Department of the West, with headquarters at St. Louis, MO, until 1857 when he took charge of the Department of Texas, headquartered at San Antonio. In late 1860 Twiggs was one of only four general officers of the line on the Army roster, the others being Winfield Scott, John E. Wool and William S. Harney. He was second in seniority to Scott and would have been in line to assume duties as General-in-Chief had Scott retired. Yet, Twiggs’ Southern sympathies caused him to surrender the military forces and stores under his command in Texas to Colonel Ben McCulloch, representing the State of Texas, an act for which Twiggs was dismissed from the Army on March 1, 1861. On May 22, 1861 Twiggs was appointed a Major-General in the Confederate Provisional Army, the senior officer of that grade, and assigned to command the District of Louisiana. As a result of his heroic military career with the United States Army during the Mexican War and as a result of him being presented with this sword, Abraham Lincoln called him the “Benedict Arnold of the South” for his defection to the Confederate States of America which he considered a treasonous act. When General Benjamin Butler captured New Orleans early in 1862, he sent a detail to capture General Twiggs. Twiggs escaped; however, Butler seized as trophies three wonderful presentation swords. Butler recommended that to show the folly of secession, the three swords should be donated to Congress, West Point, and the final one, this Congressional presentation, to be given to President Lincoln. In an excerpt from Lincoln’s letter to Congress : “I have in my possession three valuable swords formerly the property of General David E. Twiggs”. These swords were eventually all placed in the U.S. Treasury Department until 20 years after the war. Twiggs’ grandson filed suit to have them returned. In advanced age and in ill health, he soon was for all intents and purposes retired and died of pneumonia near Augusta, Georgia on July 15, 1862. We know of no other Civil War sword associated with Abraham Lincoln. Two acts of Congress were required for the return of this sword to the Twiggs family. The presentation plaque on this sword is engraved “Presented by President of the United States agreeable by resolution of Congress to Brig. Gen. David E. Twiggs in testimony of the high sense entertained by Congress of his gallantry and good conduct in storming Monterey. Resolution approved March 2, 1847.” Below this presentation are two gold plaques. One 3″ x 1″ in gold, raised relief depicting a battle scene showing infantry and cavalry charging past Mexican cannons during the storming of Monterey. Beneath this raised panel is a 4″ x 1″ engraved gold panel showing finely detailed soldiers—over 100 in all in this tiny panel—showing American flags and cannons firing. The large, 2″ langet in solid gold relief shows the storming of the fortress at Monterey. Above the langet, and beautifully engraved, are four gold straps decorated with floral, military motifs, including cross cannons and halberds, are interspersed with four mother-of-pearl panels with precious stones and gold studs. Topping the pommel of this sword is a solid gold American eagle, almost 2″ long and 1″ high, overlooking the battle scenes below. Also accompanying this fabulous sword is a wonderful painting of Gen. Twiggs done in 1855 by John W. Dodge. The painting was executed in July 1855 and is so inscribed. The painted image is approximately 6″ x 9″ on cardboard and is mounted in an elegant gold frame. Together, the sale of this unique and historically important sword and portrait is destined for the record books. In the world of fine art and antiques this moment in American auction history will be reported worldwide. CONDITION: 31-1/4″, double-edge, central fullered blade exhibits most of its original frost. Blade is in extremely fine condition with scattered areas of black staining. Gold and mother-of-pearl mounted hilt appears excellent in every regard. The only defect discernible is the broken and missing wing of the eagle on the reverse side of pommel. The eagle’s obverse wing also exhibits a hairline crack, but it is still solidly attached and has no chance of breaking unless hit with a severe blow. Mother-of-pearl slabs are so often chipped, cracked, and damaged, especially when exhibiting so much cutting and insetting. Only one small crack occurs in mother-of-pearl in upper-right panel. Sapphires and diamonds appear perfect. Topaz has a chip in its upper quadrant. Scabbard body is perfect with just scratches and scuffs. Mounts show light wear only at the highest spots. The bottom left floral decoration of the frame surrounding the presentation is worn showing silver where gilt has worn or been rubbed off. The solid gold, fluted drag exhibits some light scratching and denting on its reverse side. 4-31482 CW16 (750,000-1,000,000)

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1301

HISTORIC AND IMPORTANT ABRAHAM LINCOLN PRESIDENTIAL PRESENTATION FIREARM TO SENATOR J. J. CRITTENDEN, ONLY ONE OF TWO KNOWN LINCOLN PRESNETATION FIREARMS. THE ONLY LINCOLN PRESENTATION FIREARM EVER SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION. SN 593. A once in a lifetime opportunity one of only two known Lincoln presented firearms and the only one in private hands. This early production 2nd Model Burnside carbine, serial number 593, was presented to John J. Crittenden, former Governor of Kentucky, Attorney General and Senator. The presentation is inscribed on an engraved oval 3″ x 1-1/2″ silver plaque which reads, “Presented to the Hon. J. J. Crittenden by A. Lincoln, President of the United States as a testimony of affection and regard for his long and patriotic service, for which a grateful people bear willing testimony. February 1, 1862” Lincoln, is known to have presented only two guns; the other being a cased pair of Colt Revolvers presented to the Sultan of Turkey during his administration (this particular pair of pistols are possibly the most valuable American guns known. A $5 million offer was purportedly made for these guns prior to their donation to the Metropolitan Museum of Art) Crittenden, a good friend of Lincoln, and one of America’s most prominent and defining Politicians was born in Kentucky in 1787, his father having emigrated there following the American Revolution. He was educated in Kentucky, as well as at William and Mary College in Virginia. Having studied law, he began his practice in 1807, and quickly became the best known lawyer in western Kentucky. He also turned his attention to politics, and beginning in 1811, he was elected to the state legislature for six successive terms. He was chosen speaker of the House in 1815 and 1816. During these years, Crittenden also performed military service in the War of 1812, receiving a special governor’s commendation for his actions during the Battle of the Thames. Following the war, Crittenden served for two years in the United States Senate, before returning to Kentucky in 1819 to practice law. The internal political strife in Kentucky between the Old Court and New Court factions, however, drew Crittenden back to politics. Siding with the conservatives, he reentered the legislature, where from 1829-32, he was again speaker of the House. In national politics, he aligned himself with Henry Clay and the administration of John Quincy Adams against Andrew Jackson. Beginning in 1835, with his election to the United States Senate, Crittenden’s political career was generally connected with the federal government. He was a leading Whig opponent of the Jackson and Van Buren administrations, and after campaigning aggressively for the Whig candidate, William Henry Harrison, in 1840, he was appointed Harrison’s attorney general. Harrison’s death, followed by President John Tyler’s conflict with the Whig party, brought about Crittenden’s resignation in September 1841. He reentered the Senate the following year, where he opposed the annexation of Texas. Following the Mexican War, he abandoned Clay to support the nomination of GeneralZachary Taylor in 1848, whom he considered more likely to win. Crittenden’s action ended his long friendship with Clay. While Crittenden did not accept a cabinet post in the Taylor administration, he agreed to serve Taylor’s successor, Millard Fillmore, as attorney general, holding the post until the end of Fillmore’s term. Two years later, in 1854, he was elected again to the Senate. The reopening of the slavery question with the Kansas-Nebraska Act disappointed Crittenden, who regretted the abandonment of the Missouri Compromise. Reflecting his border-state and conservative character, he stood for any course that would restore sectional peace. He considered the possible dissolution of the Union as “the greatest evil” that could befall the country. In the election of 1860, he supported the Constitutional Union party ticket. Following Lincoln’s election, Crittenden introduced in the Senate his propositions, the most important of which restored by constitutional amendment the Missouri Compromise line. Known as the “Crittenden Compromise” he was unable to gain passage of his proposals or to get a popular referendum on them. He also failed in his efforts to secure adoption of the program of the Peace Convention which assembled in Washington in February 1861. Compromise having failed, Crittenden returned to Kentucky, where he actively sought to keep the state from seceding. On April 17, just days after the bombardment of Fort Sumter, Crittenden again urged his state to remain in the Union. Kentucky’s divided loyalties were reflected in Crittenden’s own family; two of his sons would lead opposing armies during the Civil War. Kentucky ultimately refused to join the Confederacy, and Crittenden was elected to the Congress, where he introduced resolutions to the effect that the war was to preserve the Union, not to interfere with slavery or to subjugate the South. As the war took a different course, he opposed the confiscation acts and the Emancipation Proclamation. He was preparing to run for reelection to Congress in 1863, when he died in Frankfort, Kentucky. It is surprising that Abraham Lincoln, one of America’s most revered Presidents and a firearms technology aficionado chose to only present two firearms during his administration. Obviously the set of Colts were a diplomatic gift. The presentation of this important and historic carbine to J.J. Crittenden, however, is a testament to his admiration and respect for this stellar politician and friend. This gun is purportedly pictured and described in a reference book on Presidential firearms and was featured in a 2-page spread in the national collecting magazine “Man At Arms.” The provenance of this Burnside Carbine is irrefutable. This gun has been in the Crittenden family until recent times and was, for many years, on loan to the Kentucky Historical Society in Frankfort, Kentucky in a featured exhibition. This gun is directly listed in a Crittenden will which is illustrated here. This gun is accompanied by a presentation trunk to J. J. Crittenden . The large, early, rectangular mahogany trunk is 38” long x 24” wide x 19” deep sitting on four 1-3/4” tall feet. Lid is 4-1/4” thick and it has a fine, large, mortised brass lock in front with a rectangular escutcheon screwed to the face. Center of lid has a 4-1/4” x 3” brass plaque inscribed “JOHN J. CRITTENDEN”. Interior was, at one time, lined with royal blue velvet, most of which has deteriorated and been removed. Inside of lid has been reinforced with application of a 1” x 3” board screwed beneath a crack in top. Apparently it originally had a lid stop in left rear corner which is now missing and there are two locator pegs on front edge. Corners are all beautifully dovetailed. Also accompanied by a volume The Crittenden Memoirs, H.H. Crittenden. Inside cover is a newspaper clipping relating that Col. Henry Huston Crittenden of Kansas City, Missouri, visiting Owensborough, Kentucky as the guests of Mr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Galey. The flyleaf is inscribed in ink to “Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Mellon Galey, in memory of a delightful visit to their home in Independence Kansas. With sincere best wishes Henry Huston Crittenden March 18, 1938”. On following page is a newspaper clipping from the Kansas City Star March 4, 1943 regarding the death & obituary of Col. Crittenden. On the dedication page is a long note signed “Thomas M. Galey” regarding the November 2, 1938 visit of Col. Crittenden to Owensborough. The volume is a total of 542 pages including index. This particular carbine was very popular in the early days of the War. Only about 2,000 of the Second Model carbines were made, and most were well used and worn. At the beginning of the war, many of these Second Model Burnsides were being used by the Rhode Island Cavalry, which saw action as early as the Battle of Manassas. Also issued these guns were the 1st Maine, the 1st New Jersey, and the 1st Pennsylvania Cavalries. The .54 caliber Burnside carbine was designed and patented by Ambrose E. Burnside and the Second model was manufactured in Rhode Island by the Bristol Firearms Company A total of five different models were manufactured during its years of production. Lowering the trigger guard, which also served as the operating lever, would cause the breech to tilt up, revealing a cone-shaped cavity. The metallic cartridge for the Burnside, of a unique cone shape, was placed into this cavity. Closing the lever rotated the breech block into position, placing the cartridge in the chamber. A percussion ignition system with an external hammer fired the carbine. A small hole at the base of the cartridge would allow the fire to pass through and ignite the powder in the case. Ambrose Burnside, the inventor of this carbine, eventually rose to the rank of Major- General in the Union Army during the Civil War. His record as a commander is not well known due to dismal record of success on the battlefield. CONDITION: Metal surfaces overall are brown, untouched with scattered light pitting, especially around nipple and breech. Rifling in bbl is very good. Stock is sound with scattered scratches, retaining proper inspector’s cartouches. Silver plaque, applied with four silver pins, is cleaned; however, shows original patina in the several dents and in the protected areas around pins. Trunk is in good to very good condition. Lid has a 1/4” wide separation which is supported on inside by the aforementioned board. It also has several grain checks and retains most of a fine restored finish. Book is fine, the brown cloth cover shows corner wear with a minor stain or two and some yellowing to pages. Spine is sound and book is in good shape. 4-314834-31610 CW17 (400,000-500,000)

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1302

CONFEDERATE DANCE ARMY REVOLVER. SN 40. Cal. 44. Dance brothers, in their Columbia, Texas factory, made about 350 Army and Navy revolvers during the Civil War. About 100 of these guns are known to exist today. The dance Army revolver is the only primary Confederate revolver made in 44 cal. It is also the largest Confederate revolver made. The dance Army is made in the style of the Colt Dragoon which was so popular with Texas troops in the Mexican war era. The most distinctive feature of dance revolvers is the lack of recoil shields on their frames. SN 40, which you are bidding on here, is a fine example. This gun was once in the collections of Sam Harrington and later Charlie Schreiner III, a great Texas collector. This gun is serial numbered in all places normally serial numbered on Dance Armies and appears orig in every regard. This gun functions well but mainspring is a bit weak. Surfaces are smooth, edges are sharp, and serial numbers are well struck and distinct. Dance revolvers saw hard use in the Civil War, this gun was used showing only minor muzzle wear with crisp front site and would make a fine addition to any collection. CONDITION: Cleaned metal surfaces are gray/black with scattered scratches, nicks, and pitting. Brass has been cleaned. Stocks are solid and fit well with numerous small dings and dents on bottom. An initial “B” is carved on right stock. Two screws in trigger guard appear replaced. 4-32950 JS505 (40,000-60,000)

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1303

HISTORIC INSCRIBED COLT SECOND MODEL DRAGOON REVOLVER INSCRIBED TO (CONFEDERATE GENERAL) JOSIAH GORGAS. SN 9327. Cal. 44. Martially marked Second Model Colt Dragoon Revolver with 7-1/2″ oct to rnd bbl, brass triggerguard & backstrap and 1-pc walnut grip. Backstrap is inscribed in period script “To Lieut. Josiah Gorgas / From his Fellow Officers.” Josiah Gorgas was a native of Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, born in 1818 and graduated from West Point in 1841. He worked in the Ordnance Corps, throughout his military career being commissioned a Lieutenant on March 3, 1847 in time to serve in the Mexican War. He served during the siege of Vera Cruz and thereafter, commanded the Ordnance Depot during Scott’s march on Mexico City. It was during this time that this historic inscribed Colt revolver was presented to him. After the Mexican War, he took charge of a number of arsenals and married the daughter of a former Governor of Alabama in 1853. Gorgas was promoted to Captain in 1855 and served in Charleston, South Carolina until 1860. Upon the opening of the Civil War he resigned his commission in the Union Army & defected to the Confederacy. President Jefferson Davis appointed him Chief of the Ordnance Department with the rank of Major. Gorgas was responsible for importing arms & ammunition from England to the Confederacy as well as utilizing captured machinery & contracting arms manufacture to a variety of contractors. He was specifically responsible for turning Richmond’s Tredegar Ironworks into an arms manufactory. Gorgas was an impressive Ordnance Chief creating an efficient department operating on limited resources and on November 19, 1864 President Davis appointed him Brigadier General. Gorgas was so efficient, in fact, that at no time was the Confederacy seriously short of armament, only the men to utilize them. Following the War, Gorgas was the superintendent of the Briarfield Ironworks and later became involved in education ultimately accepting the Presidency of the University of Alabama. Josiah Gorgas died on May 15, 1883. Gorgas’ contributions to the Confederate war effort had never been undervalued, literally turning plowshares into swords. This historic Colt revolver, obviously a valued sidearm, is one of the most important Colt revolvers to come to the open market in recent years. Accompanied by a wonderful & rare period flap holster with belt loop, built in Confederate style, especially for a dragoon. Gorgas’ career is detailed in a book, Plowshares into Swords, Van Diver, from Texas A&M University. CONDITION: Very good, all matching including grip. All metal surfaces are a deep plum/brown color with light surface pitting on the bbl & frame. No cylinder scene remains. Grip is fine with chipped toes showing moderate to heavy wear and retains 60-70% strong orig varnish. Mechanics are fine, strong sharp dark bore. Holster is fine having been treated, is now soft & supple with heavily crackled surface and a couple of minor tears at base of flap. Toe shows very heavy wear, missing its plug with a tear by seam on bbl end. 4-32952 JR339 (50,000-100,000)

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1304

THE FINEST PAIR OF CONSECUTIVE NUMBERED, CONFEDERATE MANUFACTURED PISTOLS KNOWN, RIGDON & ANSLEY. SN 1774 & 1775. Cal. 36. Rarely are Confederate handguns found with orig blue finish. These two Augusta, GA made guns exhibit as much as 50% orig bright finish and traces of case color. Both guns are orig and authentic in every regard with fine inspection marks of Wescom Hudgins. Both guns are well fit, properly serial numbered on every part normally serial numbered. Several casting flaws, often present on Confederate manufactured arms, are visible in cyl and bbl housing of SN 1775. Only about 7,500 Confederate revolvers were made by all manufacturers and less than 1000 by Rigdon & Ansley. There are few consecutive pairs of any Confederate guns known. We sold a consecutive pair of Griswolds in NRA fair condition for $80,500 in our March 2004 auction, and these are vastly superior in condition and rarity. These guns, in excellent condition, are about as fine as any single gun that can be encountered in Confederate revolvers, much less this exceptional, high condition, consecutive pair. If you want to own the finest consecutive pair of Confederate handguns in existence, this will be your only chance to do so. CONDITION: Fine overall. All iron parts retain bright blue finish, some turning to black. Actions are crisp. Nipples show little wear. Brass parts show good patina. 4-31237 JS230 (150,000-175,000)

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1305

HISTORIC AND EXTREMELY RARE AND FINE CONDITION CASED GRISWOLD CONFEDERATE REVOLVER IDENTIFIED TO A SURGEON IN THE 25TH SOUTH CAROLINA INFANTRY. SN 663. This is possibly the finest condition 1st Model Griswold known and the only original cased Griswold revolver. A wonderful identified classic brass frame Confederate revolver with a rich history. This Griswold revolver produced in Griswoldville, GA, serial number 663 is a brass framed copy of the Colt Model 1851 revolver with a 6-shot round cylinder, dragoon style barrel, octagon to round with one-piece walnut grips and a brass frame, trigger guard and back strap. The serial is stamped in large numbers on the right side of the frame, right side of the barrel housing, on the cylinder and “63” on the loading lever. The revolver is accompanied by its original walnut case, similar to a Colt revolver style case measuring 14-½” X 6-¼” X 2” with a diamond shaped key escutcheon on the front. The segmented interior, without accessories, is lined in velvet. On the bottom of the case, in period pencil, is “S. Logan, M.D./Richmond/ Va.” This revolver is identified to Surgeon Samuel Logan. Logan saw service throughout the entire war. He was appointed on July 19, 1861 and was paroled at Greensboro, NC with Johnson’s Army on May 1, 1865. Serving off and on as Chief Surgeon of the 2nd and 3rd Military Department, C.S.A., throughout most of the war he served in the 25th SC Infantry, also known as the Eutaw Regiment of Hagood’s Brigade. The Twenty-Fifth SC was organized during the winter of 1861-1862 with men from the 11th Battalion who were from Charleston. Under the command of General Johnson Hagood in September, 1863 the 25th Regiment was deployed in the defense of Charleston for much of the war. The 25th Regiment was mustered into Confederate service on 22 July 1862. Hagood’s Brigade served on the islands adjacent to Charleston until May of 1864. They were stationed at Camp Pemberton on James Island and rotated with other units to Fort Sumter, Fort Johnson, Fort Lamar at Successionville, Wagner Battery and Gregg Battery on Morris Island. Some of the members of the 25th Regiment were captured on 7 September 1863 at the fall of Battery Wagner(Fort Wagner). Upon being sent to VA during the spring of 1864 following the Charleston campaign the regiment numbered 764 men. The 25th Regiment played a major role in the defense of Petersburg, including the battles of Drewry’s Bluff, the Bermuda Hundreds, Cold Harbor, Walthall Junction, The Battle of the Crater, and the Battle of Weldon Railroad. At Weldon Railroad there were 2 killed, 29 wounded, and 70 missing. After the disaster at Weldon Railroad on 21 August 1864, the 25th Regiment participated in the engagement at Fort Harrison. By late 1864, Wilmington, NC was the only surviving major seaport in the South. In December of 1864 the 25th Regiment was sent to Wilmington, NC to help defend Fort Fisher that protected the blockade runners bringing imported munitions and supplies vital to the Confederate army waiting at the VA front. Many of the 25th S.C. Infantry were captured during the fall of Fort Fisher. The 25th Regiment was surrendered by General Joseph E. Johnson at Durham Station, NC on April 26, 1865. Surgeon Logan was paroled on May 1, 1865. CONDITION: Fine with a wonderful dark patina overall. Blue turning plum overall. Markings are clear, edges sharp but showing moderate wear. The right side of the bbl housing shows a number of scattered nicks. A few casting flaws are found principally on brass parts but the iron parts have only small areas of peppery pitting here and there. Revolvers identified to surgeons from the North or South are extremely rare and this may also be the only known cased Griswold & Gunnison in existence. An attractive Confederate revolver with an excellent provenance related to an important SC surgeon. The revolver is accompanied by a large file of photocopied archival records. 4-31238 CW4 (50,000-75,000)

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1306

GRISWOLD REVOLVER SN 2929. Cal. 36. You are bidding on a fine all orig Griswold revolver. The serial number occurs on all parts normally numbered. The secondary number “19” occurs on all parts normally numbered including the right bottom of stocks. A cryptic “D” is found on various parts including bottom of bbl and back of cylinder where this mark is often worn and indiscernible. A Roman numeral “II” is found internally on the brass parts. If you want just one nice Confederate handgun, this could be the one. This is a fine all orig example of the largest Confederate revolver manufacturer; Samuel Griswold. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are gray with scattered staining and pitting. Mechanics are good. Brass is smooth with scattered scratches and nicks. Stocks are well fit with scattered scratches and dings. 4-32949 JS507 (20,000-30,000)

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1307

IDENTIFIED GRISWOLD 1ST MODEL REVOLVER, SN 518. Cal. 36. First models of all revolvers, especially in the first 700 guns, have a lower survival rate than other Griswold’s. These earlier guns according to some experts were made by different workers in the later production guns. These guns lack Roman numerals but otherwise are similarly marked to later first model and standard production guns. This gun exhibits serial number “518” on cylinder, bbl housing, and frame on the right side. A secondary number “18” is found on triggerguard, backstrap and correctly penciled inside stocks. A cryptic “B” is found on the brass parts but is not discernible on cylinder or bbl. All major parts of this gun are orig with several screws, mainspring, and wedge being replacements. A name “W. A. JONES” is stamped on bottom of back strap. While trying to research who W. A. Jones could be; a Confederate soldier with this name shows up in most every Confederate state. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are black with pitting. Serial numbers are discernible, weak on bbl housing. Brass is cleaned showing numerous nicks, scrapes and scratches. Stocks are sound as refinished with several chips a crack on right side. 4-32951 JS508 (15,000-20,000)

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1308

GRISWOLD CONFEDERATE REVOLVER. SN 2347. Cal. 36. SN appears on bbl housing, cyl, and frame. Secondary number “7” appears on loading arm and triggerguard. Wedge appears to be Colt and has 5-digit SN, though it appears orig to this gun’s time of use based on colour and condition. A cryptic letter “C” occurs on bottom of bbl near latch, frame, triggerguard, and backstrap. Roman numeral “IIII” is cut into triggerguard and backstrap. With exception of a couple screws and mainspring, gun appears to be all orig and authentic. CONDITION: Metal is gray/black with numerous dings, scratches, and scrapes. Brass is cleaned with numerous scrapes, dents, and scratches. Left side of stock has an area carved, such that thumb better fits grips and has small repair. 4-32918 JS228 (18,000-22,000)

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1309

AUGUSTA MACHINE WORKS PISTOL POSSIBLY CARRIED ON THE CSS SHENANDOAH . SN 24. Cal. 36. This Confederate made copy of a Colt Navy revolver, with 8” fully oct bbl, is thought to be a product of the Augusta Machine Works in Augusta Georgia. This fine inscribed gun was in the collection of David Cline who displayed his massive collection for many years along the walls of his bait shop in Eau Galley, FL. Many marveled at Cline’s enormous collection from cap guns to Henry rifles and this Confederate handgun among others. He bought and traded for guns for many years until his collection was auctioned in the mid-1990s. This was probably the most significant historical gun as we know of no other Confederate arms from the CSS Shenandoah. “H Canning”, which is engraved on backstrap, is a sailor listed on the Shenandoah late in the Civil War. Augusta Machine Works pistols are thought to have been made late in the war based on other identified examples and finding an identified gun from the CSS Shenandoah, which sailed for months after the war officially ended, would make sense for a sailor in 1865 to have acquired such a gun. There are a couple variations of Augusta pistols: one having thick bulging grips, and the other, like, having slimmer grips like this one. Augusta’s can have 6 or 12 stop cylinders – this one has six. This is a fine example that appears to be orig throughout. Like so many guns of this pattern, serial numbers or cryptics appear infrequently on the gun. This gun exhibits serial number “24” on the unloading arm and inside the recoil shield. A number “2” is found on the back of the cylinder. There are two other nearly identical guns to this including serial number “61”, which was once in the Ted Meredith collection. Letters of provenance accompany this gun from the buyer from the Cline auction a letter from Ted Meredith stating his opinion as to the guns authenticity. There are probably less than 20 examples known of all Augusta machine Works variations and this is a fine one. CONDITION: Metal surfaces smooth and gray overall with scattered scratches and pitting. Mechanics are very good. Stocks are solid & well fit with scattered scratches and nicks. 4-32944 JS506 (30,000-40,000)

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1310

HIGHEST SERIAL NUMBERED RIGDON AND ANSLEY KNOWN. SN 2373. Cal. 36. Rigdon and Ansley Augusta, Georgia made Confederate revolver serial number 2373 was discovered in Texas in about 1995. No authorities knew about this gun until then (published serial numbers in texts only go to 2359). This gun appears all orig and is properly serial numbered in all places where serial numbers normally are found. In the very late serial numbers of these guns, wedges are found with no springs and this wedge is of that type and though it is not serial numbered, it appears correct. The loading latch is not serial numbered and appears to be a period replacement. The grip’s profile is slightly different to earlier produced Rigdons in that these are slightly slimmed at frame. The CSA markings on bbl are especially deep and well struck. You are bidding on one of the last revolver’s made in the Confederacy and it is a fine example. CONDITION: Metal overall is gray with scattered scratches and dings. SN on triggerguard is partially obscured as can be seen in photos. Only the first three digits of the serial number on cylinder are visible. 4-32943 JS500 (25,000-35,000)

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1311

SPILLER & BURR REVOLVER REVOLVER WITH HOLSTER AND BELT. SN 190/387. Cal. 36. This scarce low serial numbered Spiller & Burr revolver is accompanied by a great Confederate flap holster and roller buckle belt. This gun was once in the collection of Fred Edmunds and he states in his accompanying letter as follows: “David J. Burr, of Richmond, Virginia, was an enterprising gentleman whose company had built a locomotive (1836) and a steam packet named the “Gov. McDowell”, which navigated the James River and the Kanawha Canal (1842). In 1880, he is listed as a commission merchant in Richmond. Also a commission merchant but established in Baltimore, was one Edward N. Spiller. Being of strong Southern leanings, Spiller moved to Richmond in 1861, where he joined forces with David Burr and a Lt. Col. James H. Burton, to manufacture revolvers for the Confederacy. James H.. Burton was born in Virginia and was educated in Pennsylvania, apprenticed in a Baltimore machine shop, and in 1844, went to work at Harper’s Ferry Arsenal where he became a foreman a year later. He was a mechanical genius: he then became a master armorer (1854). He became chief engineer of the Royal Small Arms Factory at Enfield, England, where he remained until 1860 when he returned to Virginia, and was commissioned Lt. Col. in the Ordnance Dept., and placed in charge of the Virginia State Armory. Upon the capture of Harper’s Ferry by the Virginia Militia, Burton took charge of the removal of the rifle and musket-making machinery to Richmond. Muskets were made there for a short time by the State of Virginia under Burton’s supervision, before the machinery was “loaned” to the Confederate Government. Spiller, Burr and Burton became partners, with the latter securing a contract with the Confederate Government for the manufacture of 15,000 revolvers (navy size). The contract date was Nov. 30th, 1861, but was renegotiated and made anew March 3, 1863, for the same 15,000 revolvers. The pistol factory was removed from Richmond to Atlanta in May of 1862. Falling far behind in production, the Confederate Government bought out Spiller & Burr near the end of 1863, and moved the operation to the Macon Armory, with Burton commanding. The manufacture of pistols continued without a break in serial numbers. Production continued in fits and starts from August, 1864, on through the following months until mid-November when, because of enemy operations, a move was made to Columbia, S.C. After that time, some pistols were assembled from parts, and some small parts were made until near the end of the war. The Spiller & Burr revolver was copied from the US Model Whitney Navy, which was made in New Haven, Connecticut. The Whitney, of course, had an iron frame, while the Spiller has a brass frame, backstrap and triggerguard. Most Spiller parts have serial numbers, although such numbers are often omitted from the loading lever assembly. Spiller frames are generally stamped with a “C.S.” (sometimes on the right side, sometimes on the left, sometimes upside down!). Less than half of the Spillers noted have serials on the cylinders. Examination, Description and Authentication of Spiller & Burr #190 The overall look of Spiller # 190 showa a pistol with an even brownish patina: a most pleasing appearance and an expected one for an original untampered-with specimaen. The one-piece solid brass frame, backstrap and triggerguard show a most pleasing patine, as does the upside-down “C.S.” stamped at the lower left side portion of the frame. Barrel is 6 and 7/8 inches long in its entirety, and protrudes 6 inches from the frame, which is the correct length: it has its original brass post front sight in excellent condition. The octagon barrel is correctly crowned at the muzzle. The serial number 387 is stamped on the bottom flat of the barrel about an inch form the frame. The barrel is 100% original Spiller & Burr and stamped with the correct dies. The triggerguard-plate, which fits into the frame, is also made of brass, and is stamped 190 at the front, as is the bottom right inside surface of the frame. The same 190 is stamped at the inside left surface of the backstrap where it meets the butt. The usual brass casting flaws are evident on the inside surfaces of the backstrap. There is an “E” stamped on the inside surface of the forward portion of the backstrap. The serial #190 is stamped also on the bottom outside surface of the buttstrap. The original iron pin which functions as a stabilizer for the grip halves, is present. As is often the case with Spillers, the original mainspring is thin at the base and has an iron wedge in place as a stabilizer filling in the cut-out in the frame. Some Spillers have wider main-springs. The original walnut two-piece grips have some dongs and minor dents, but fit perfectly, showing surprisingly little shrinkage. They are most attractive with their brass escutcheons and iron screw holding them in place. “190” is pencil;ed-in on the inside of the left grip. The unnumbered original cylinder shows a most pleasing patina which matches perfectly the remainder of the gun: it is in excellent condition with its original percussion nipples intact. Also original in every respect, but unnumbered is the loading lever assembly, very similar to the Whitney revolver, from which it was copied, of course, but far more crudely made and finished: unnumbered loading lever assemblies in Spillers are often observed, prompting many collectors to question their originality and giving rise to the suspicion of replacement. More often than not, such feelings are unwarranted. The loading lever assembly has the same pleasing patina as does the original hammer (both having originally been casehardened). Loading lever catch is original and inlets into the barrel precisely. In so far as it is possible to determine, all screws appear to be original. CONCLUSION Spiller & Burr #190 is an excellent example of one of the rarest Confederate manufactured handguns. It is in original untouched condition, having an aged patina overall. Pistol #190 was one of the 700+ guns made and assembled at the Spiller & Burr Atlanta factory before the operation was taken over by the Confederate Government and moved to Macon in late 1863, where some 600+ or – (more) were made or assembled. The observation that the serial number 387 appears on the bottom of the barrel, rather than the #190 serial on the remainder of the gun, should not be of any concern, for the reason that it is a Spiller barrel: its numbers are Spiller dies: post front sight and loading lever catch are original Spiller manufacture. The undersigned ahs observed at least twelve other Spillers where the barrel was stamped with a different number than the remaining parts. For example, one which readily comes to mind is Spiller #548, an excellent original Spiller which has its barrel stamped “488” with the large Spiller dies. Her again, #548 has its original barrel with its crowned muzzle: post front sight and loading lever catch are original. The reason for this mis-numbering? Possibly occurred at the time of assembly, either by mistake or because correctly-numbered barrel was defective. Another theory: Correctly numbered barrels might not have passed inspection and were discarded. Remember, serial numbers were only important to the Confederate gun makers to aid them in fitting together the various parts: function was their goal. Thus, Spiller & Burr #190 takes its place as being one of the approximately 1300 revolvers made by that company, joining the small overall production of what are considered to be the primary Confederate handguns: Griswold & Gunnison, 3600: Leech & Rigdon, 1500: Rigdon & Ansley, 900. A grand total 7306! With the high mortality rate of Confederate handguns, combined with the hard use they generally received rendering most in poor condition, Spiller #1990 is truly a collector’s Treasure! Frederick R. Edmunds Curator Gettysburg, Pennsylvania December 1, 1998″. CONDITION: Metal surfaces gray with scattered pitting. Loading assembly is possibly replaced since there are no serial #s. Brass is patinaed with scattered scratches and nicks. Stocks are well fit and exhibit scattered scratches and dings. Holster & belt are solid & sound with some crazing to the holster and new black dye added to flaked areas. 4-32947 JS509 (20,000-25,000)

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1312

SPILLER & BURR CONFEDERATE REVOLVER. SN 67. Cal. 36. This rare, early serial numbered Spiller & Burr is marked “CS” on right side of frame, and “Spiller & Burr” is stamped on top bbl flat. SN is found on bbl, cyl, frame, and base pin. Loading assembly must have broken on this gun, and the soldier continued to use it by improvising a solid end where loading assembly once was. Stocks, when removed, have a date, a name, and other barely discernible writing. Further research may ascertain identity from these markings. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are gray/brown. Brass has been cleaned and has numerous scratches and dings. Stocks are dented, with several cut notches in each, and a 1” x ½” sliver is missing from toe of left stock. Cyl appears to have old repair which is pitted and rusted. Action does not work. Triggerguard is not serial numbered and is probably from a Whitney. 8-76223 JS229 (12,000-15,000)

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1313

COLT NAVY CARRIED BY CAPTAIN THOMAS CHUBB OF THE CONFEDERATE SCHOONER ROYAL YACHT. SN 23167. This wonderful condition model 1851 Colt Navy was recently found in the state of Vermont where Chubb died at his summer home in 1886. Chubb’s son had a business of manufacturing fishing rods and reels with the Thomas H. Chubb brand, which are highly collectible today. This business was near Chubb’s summer home in Post Mills, Vermont. The commemorative inscription on backstrap of gun reads “CAPT T. H. CHUBB, 1861-1865” and “CSN ROYAL YACHT” back of triggerguard. Accompanying this gun is a large folio of history which tells us more than has been published in texts on the Confederate Navy. Thomas Moebs, in his definitive Confederate Navy volume, knows little of Chubb’s life or service, though his record on the Royal Yacht and his exchange from Ft. LaFayette are mentioned. From the attached records; Chubb is listed as being Commodore “born in 1811 of good old Revolutionary stock and within the very shadow of the Bunker Hill Monument where his parents and grandparents lived”. Chubb in his 80th year “was one of the most sprightly participants in the Bunker Hill celebration which took place on June 17, 1890”. Thomas Chubb had a long history with the sea and various navies. “Mr. Chubb left his Puritan Home when a mere boy, contrary to the wishes of his parents, and engaged as cabin boy on a coasting schooner, next on board of a man of war, and was soon a full fledged seamen. When the United States squadron was ordered to the Mediterranean in 1827, Chubb was numbered among the crew of the flagship JAVA under the command of Commodore Crane. A call for volunteers to man the US schooner PORPOISE against the Greek Pirates that were preying upon American merchant men in the Mediterranean was responded to by Chubb. The cruise offered sufficient site of bloodshed and carnage to fully appease the young man’s desire for naval combat. In 1838, Captain Chubb, then in the very prime of manhood and abundantly supplied with wealth, became so earnestly aroused in behalf of the Texans in their struggle for independence that he loaded the Brigg, CECELIA, with munitions of war and sailed for Texas In 1839 he established a head-right in Texas, his family joining him the same year coming from Massachusetts. He was appointed superintendent of public construction by Sam Houston (who was a warm friend of the Captains) He continued in this service until the outbreak of the Civil War, when the association’s pilot boats were all captured by the blockading fleet, excepting the Royal Yacht. Though an Eastern man by birth and education, he was a Southern man by adoption and inclination; at the secession of his state he took up arms in defense of his rights and his property with the same determination that characterized his whole life. He was one of the first men afloat in the Confederate Navy, and his vessel, the ROYAL YACHT played an important part through the entire war”. Captain Chubb was involved in the capture of the federal steamer STAR OF THE WEST which was taken as a prize and sent to New Orleans. The Royal Yacht was commissioned on the 9th of September 1861 and was attacked by the enemy on the eighth day of November following. This attack, near Galveston, from the USS Santee overwhelmed Captain Chubb 100 U.S sailors to 13 aboard the ROYAL YACHT. When the attack was first made, there were only two men on the deck, one of whom was slightly wounded. The noise of the attack soon brought Captain Chubb and Captain William Saunders to the deck and they alone stood combating against a hundred men. The fight was a desperate one and lasted until all the means of defense on the YACHT were exhausted. Their shots had told with effect on the enemy, killing seven of them, and wounding eight others, some mortally”. Captain Chubb was placed on the Santee, transported to New York where he and his men were marched in irons through the streets…. they were afterward sent to Fort Lafayette….. Chubb was later exchanged….” and upon arriving in Texas he was met by any most cheering reception by the citizens of Houston and was asked to tell the story of his capture and confinement…..Upon reaching Galveston…. was lionized as hero of one of the most gallant fights of the war. It was this engagement that gave Jewett his promotion and cost the warmest friendship between Admiral Jewett and Commodore Chubb. Commodore Chubb continued in the fight as long as there was a ray of hope left, and contributed freely of his ample means. But when Lee surrendered he was among the first to step back to the old standard of the Stars & Stripes….. soon after the close of the war he was appointed by Mayor Bolton and Alderman of the city of Galveston to the office of harbor master at the port of Galveston which office he held until his death” at his summer home in Vermont. Chubb is buried in Galveston, Texas. CONDITION: This gun is mechanically fine, tight with sharp edges in as found condition. Gun overall is gray with scattered pitting over 20 or 30% bright blue on bbl. Cyl scene is complete but with scattered pitting. Backstrap and triggerguard retained a portion of their silver-plate. Stocks are very good with much orig varnish, a small chip is present on inside toe of left stock. 4-32838 JS352 (10,000-20,000)

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1314

SCARCE TRANSITION FIRST MODEL PARIS LEMAT. SN 663. Cal. 10.6 mm/16 ga. Usual configuration with 6-3/4″ oct bbl, dovetail brass front sight, engraved on top flat “COL. LeMat Bte sgdg Paris”. It has rammer mounted to left side as with 2nd models. It has usual 9-shot cylinder. Smoothbore bbl is about 6-5/8″ threaded on the head for bbl boss attached to oct bbl. It has spring loaded bayonet, latch with spur trigger guard, 2-pc checkered walnut grips & a swiveling stud & lanyard ring in butt. Hammer nose is articulated with a rounded short stud from each side. These grapeshot revolvers were a favorite of the Confederate Cavalry and saw extensive use throughout Civil War. CONDITION: Good to very good, all matching including grips. Overall retains a smooth medium brown patina with some very fine pitting at muzzle end of bbl & on cylinder. Bbl slip ring, at cylinder end, shows welding repairs with some alteration on rammer pivot, which may be an old replacement. Oct bbl also shows some artificial aging. Grips are sound showing heavy wear. Mechanics are fine, strong dark rifle bore, lightly pitting smoothbore. 4-32945 JR335 (17,500-27,500)

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1315

FINE LONDON LEMAT GRAPESHOT REVOLVER. SN 8545. Cal. 42/16 ga. Usual configuration with 6-5/8″ oct bbl, with orig tall dovetail front sight and marked on top “LEMAT & GIRARD’S PATENT LONDON” with a smoothbore bbl/cylinder pivot mounted into frame. It has a 9-shot 42 caliber cylinder, missing one nipple. Loading lever is on left side of bbl and has a welded repair above pivot. It has a sliding pin bbl/frame connection and has checkered 2-pc walnut grips with a Fleur-de-lis proof on left raised panel. Front end of frame has assembly number “599” which number is also found on back of cylinder & inside face of bbl boss. Inspector or assembly number “02” is also found in this location and on rear of cylinder. This revolver, while not documented as a specific Confederate used sidearm, is only 39 numbers away from a known Confederate revolver, serial number 8584, which was used by Lt. Simeon Cummings of the C.S.S. Alabama to commit suicide or accidentally shoot himself on board the Alabama while in port in South Africa. This story is related in LeMat The Man The Gun, Forgett & Serpette. Accompanied by an early pine casing that may or may not be orig to this revolver. It has coarse green wool fabric lining that appears to have great age. Compartmented in bottom for revolver, an orig LeMat brass bullet mold with s[rue cutter for a conical bullet and two small rnd balls. It also has a small decorative brass & copper flask, what appears to be a maple handled orig nipple wrench with half of orig ebony cap and a turned maple tamping rod for shot bbl. It is generally accepted that the London LeMats are Confederate firearms. CONDITION: Fine, all matching. Bbl retains about 80% glossy orig blue with flaked areas a dark patina. Cylinder retains 60-70% flaked orig blue with its missing nipple. Frame is flaked to a medium patina with traces of orig blue. Grips show light wear and retain most of their orig oil finish. Rammer is orig with matching number its welded repair. Rifled bore is strong with moderate to heavy pitting. Shotgun bore has scattered spots of pitting. Case has a couple of cracks in lid and another in bottom and shows heavy wear. Interior is faded with moth damage inside lid with wear & soil in bottom. Flask is fine, mold is very fine. A rare set that would fit into anyone’s collection. 4-31115 JR201 (8,000-12,000)

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1316

FINE SECOND MODEL PARIS LEMAT GRAPESHOT REVOLVER. SN 1581. Cal. 10.6 mm/16 ga. Usual configuration with 7″ oct rifled bbl & 6-3/4″ smoothbore bbl/cylinder pivot. It has rammer mounted on left side with bbl engraved in script “Col Le Mat Bte s.g.d.g. Paris”. It has usual 9-shot cylinder with an articulated hammer nose by means of a central thumb lever. Mounted with 2-pc checkered walnut grips and has an integral lanyard loop in butt. These revolvers were a favorite of the Confederate Cavalry and saw extensive service throughout Civil War, especially by Gen. Beauregard who was a personal friend of Le Mat. CONDITION: Fine plus, all matching except grips which numbers could not be determined. Oct bbl retains 35-40% orig blue mixed with brown patina. Smoothbore bbl & cylinder retain a mottled dark brown patina. Frame retains 15-20% strong orig blue on bottom & top of frames and recoil shield. Grip frame, trigger guard & sides of frame are a dark smooth brown patina. Rifled bore bosses are stuck to smoothbore and will not unscrew although the smoothbore will unscrew from frame. Grips show moderate wear with a hand worn patina. Mechanics are fine, rifled bore is strong with moderate to heavy pitting; smoothbore is clean with fine pitting. 4-32955 JR336 (20,000-30,000)

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1317

RARE MURDAUGH CONFEDERATE NAVY CONTRACT PARIS LEMAT GRAPESHOT REVOLVER. SN 2431. Cal. 10.6 mm/16 ga. Usual configuration with 6-5/8″ oct rifled bbl with tall dovetail front sight, rammer on left side with small block letter address “SYSTme LEMAT Bte s.c.d.g. PARIS” and British proofs on lower left flat. Right side of bbl has LeMat’s star over “LM” logo. It has usual 9-shot cylinder with small British proofs between all of nipples with one stamped “M” for Confederate Naval Lt. William H. Murdaugh who was sent to London in 1864 to inspect & receive all arms for Confederate Navy. It has usual 6-3/4″ smoothbore bbl and standard hammer with articulated nose by means of a central thumb lever. It also has checkered 2-pc walnut grips with an integral lanyard loop in butt and trigger guard without spur. It is unknown how many of these Murdaugh inspected grapeshot revolvers were actually purchased but few survive today. CONDITION: Fine, all matching except rammer which is unnumbered and appears to be a fine replacement as are the rammer screw & latch. No orig finish remains being a thin, mottled, silver/brown patina on bbl and a smooth gray patina on cylinder & frame. Grips are very fine with moderate wear & a dark oil stained patina. Mechanics are fine, worn dark rifled bore, moderately pitted smoothbore. A rare Confederate revolver seldom ever encountered in any condition. 4-32946 JR337 (25,000-35,000)

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1318

TRANSITION LEMAT GRAPESHOT REVOLVER. SN 1002. Cal. 10.6 mm rifled bbl/16 ga. smoothbore. Second model configuration with 6-5/8″ oct bbl, high dovetail front sight with left side mounted replacement rammer that appears to be orig equipment but is not numbered. It has 6-3/4″ smoothbore bbl/cylinder pivot & usual 9-shot cylinder. It has second model style hammer with pivoting nose, broken thumb lever. It has first model bbl/frame latch and a spur on trigger guard with 2-pc checkered walnut grips & an integral lanyard loop buttcap. These revolvers were greatly favored by Confederate Cavalry & used throughout Civil War, especially by Gen. Beauregard. CONDITION: Good to very good, all matching including grips, except rammer as noted. No orig finish remains being a smooth worn gray patina with only traces of bbl inscription remaining. Grips have chipped heels, otherwise are sound, showing heavy wear with a dark oil-stained patina. Hammer is without half cock notch, otherwise mechanics are fine, very worn dark rifled bore and lightly pitted smoothbore. 4-33336 JR340 (7,500-12,500)

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1319
Revised: 10/19/2007

(Additional Information) We have been contacted by Doug Adams, noted author of The Confederate LeMat Revolver and he has indicated that early on LeMat had an inspector by the name of Chapman, although he does not know whether this is, in fact, the same early inspector, or not, however it would be an excellent topic for future research.

RARE PROTOTYPE OR EXPERIMENTAL LEMAT GRAPESHOT REVOLVER. SN 1945. Cal. 42/16 ga. Nickel finish with 6-3/4″ smoothbore oct bbl which was never rifled, usual tall dovetailed front sight with an uncommon tall fixed rear sight. Top flat is engraved in period script “Systeme Le Mat Bte sgdg Paris” surrounded by a line border engraving. Right flat has the serial number and Le Mat’s logo of a star over “LM”. It is very unusual in that it does not screw to the smoothbore bbl but simply slides on with a pressure fit in the front ring and is attached with a screw through the hole where link pin would normally be. Rammer on left side of bbl is about 1/8″ thick flat steel with beveled outer edge and a circular area which would contact bullet nose secured with a normal sized blued screw. It has usual 9-shot percussion cylinder with serial number on outer diameter and a simple incised line around the front edge instead of the usual raised, knurled rim.. Smoothbore bbl is 6-1/8″ long with only markings being serial number on right side at frame. Frame is slightly thinner in some places and trigger guard is also somewhat thinner. Trigger is also thinner with a lighter & shorter trigger guard. Hammer is about identical in contour to the 2nd Model LeMat revolver but it has an unusual articulated nose which is half exposed and without usual thumb lever. It has standard checkered walnut grips with screw from right side rather than usual left side. Bottom of each grip has inked serial number that appears to be “1701” and inside left grip is stamped “L. CHAPMAN” and inside right grip hand written in pencil is “L. CHAPMAN / COLLINSVILLE CONN”. It is readily apparent that Le Mat was experimenting with this piece but to this cataloger’s knowledge none of features found on this revolver were ever implemented in production. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbl & rammer retain most of their strong bright orig nickel with some flaking on left side and sharp edges. Pin retainer spring screw is missing half its head. Cylinder retains about 95-96% strong bright orig nickel. Smoothbore bbl, in exposed area, retains 93-95% orig bright nickel. Frame, hammer & trigger guard retain about 85% of their orig nickel with with most of the losses from heavy flaking on front & backstraps. Grips show light wear with a fine oiled patina. Mechanics are crisp, top bore is bright & shiny with a few spots of light pitting. Shotgun bore is fine with very fine pitting. Altogether a most unusual and rare revolver. 8-87519 JR210 (10,000-15,000)

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1320

EXCEPTIONALLY RARE CONSECUTIVE NUMBERED PAIR OF COLT MODEL 1860 FLUTED ARMY PERCUSSION REVOLVERS WITH CONFEDERATE USE. SN 1542 & 1543. Cal. 44. This extraordinarily rare pair of Colts was shipped to Confederate Maj. Gen. William Thompson Martin of Natchez, Mississippi on Jan. 17, 1861 in a shipment of 160 same type guns along with 80 attachable stocks and 80 flasks. General, at that time Colonel, Martin had ordered these to outfit his cavalry regiment with a pair of Colt revolvers, a stock, a flask & a pair of saddle holsters. This is documented in a Colt factory letter as stated above, a copy of which, for serial number 1542, accompanies this lot. Apparently serial number 1543 is a “no record” at Colt. The likely reason is that they were shipped as a pair and therefore not recorded. Col. Martin, prior to beginning of the Civil War, was the 1st Lieutenant of the Natchez Guard. When the war opened he organized and was elected Captain of the Adams Troop of Cavalry. The Adams Troop was made up of some of the wealthiest men of Adams County & purchased the finest weapons & equipment. Each man had two fine horses and brand new uniforms. After the firing on Fort Sumter, Capt. Martin & his Troop chartered a steamboat to Memphis, TN, where they boarded a train bound for Richmond. Upon arrival at Richmond, the Adams Troop was joined by the Virginia Company (almost as splendid as the Adams Troop). On Oct. 24, 1861, Martin was promoted to Major and given command of this company commonly known as the “brag company of the South”. Maj. Martin and his men were baptized with fire at the Battle of Seven Pines and under Gen. J.E.B. Stewart, was incorporated into the famous Jeff Davis Legion. In the latter part of 1861 he was promoted to Lt. Colonel. The Jeff Davis Legion, as part of Stewart’s cavalry, saw extensive action at the Battle of Williamsburg, and many other skirmishes during May 1862,. On June 12-15, 1862, Stewart made his famous ride around McClellan’s army. Gen. Stewart hand-picked 1,200 men and officers to accompany him on this ride. They included the 9th VA Cav., Col. W.H.F. Lee, the 1st VA Cav. Col. Fitzhugh Lee and the Jeff Davis Legion, Lt. Col. W. T. Martin. The Legion fought in the Seven Days Battle and was with Lee’s Army when he forced McClellan’s Army off the peninsula and saved Richmond. On Sept. 17, 1862, the bloodiest day of the war was fought at Antietam. Lt. Col. Martin was personal aide to Gen. Robert E. Lee during this battle. The Legion attacked U.S. Gen. Abner Doubleday and his 30 guns capturing the cannons and their gunners. The Legion held the left flank supported by Gen. Early’s division. Due to his courage under fire and leadership ability, on Jan. 3, 1863, Martin was promoted to Brigadier General and transferred to the western front and given a cavalry division under Gen. “Fighting Joe” Wheeler as part of Bragg’s Army of the Tennessee. The Jeff Davis Legion went on to fight in many of the most famous battles of the Civil War, including: Brandy Station (June 9, 1863), Upperville (June 21, 1863), Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863), Bristoe Campaign (Oct. 1863), Mine Run Campaign (Nov.-Dec. 1863), The Wilderness (May 5-6, 1864), Spotsylvania Court House (May 8-21, 1864), North Anna (May 23-26, 1864), Cold Harbor (June 1-3, 1864), Petersburg Siege (June 1864-April 1865), Williamsburg Road (Oct. 27, 1864) and the Carolinas Campaign (Feb.-Apr. 1865). This represents an opportunity to acquire an extremely historic pair of early Colt pistols that undoubtedly saw a tremendous amount of heroic service in the Civil War. Accompanied by the aforementioned Colt letter along with a 3-ring binder of the history of the Jeff Davis Legion of Mississippi Cavalry and their service throughout the Civil War. Gen. Martin, had a long & distinguished career after the Civil War in local & state politics, a railroad man and a trustee of a university, a college and a hospital and was eventually elected a state senator and served from 1882-1894. In 1905, at age 82, Gen. Martin was appointed Postmaster of Natchez and died on March 10, 1910, fifteen days before his 87th birthday. He was born March 25, 1823 in Glasgow, Kentucky. The revolvers both have 8” rnd bbls with full fluted cylinders and 4-screw frames cut for shoulder stock, with round headed hammer screws apparently having been changed out some time during period of use. Stock screws are also short & round headed apparently having been changed. They both have brass trigger guards & iron back straps with 1-pc walnut grips. CONDITION: Both revolvers are in nearly identical condition. No orig finish remains being a cleaned gray patina over all metal surfaces, beginning to repatinate. Both have minor dents & dings and apparently have been waxed. Both have chipped grips with No. 1542 slightly battered on bottom. Both grips show moderate to heavy wear and a fine hand worn patina. On both, mechanics are fine with strong bores and moderate to heavy pitting. A truly historic & wonderful pair of documented Civil War used Colts. 4-32670 JR612 (50,000-80,000)

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1321

RARE MARTIALLY MARKED COLT MODEL 1860 FLUTED ARMY PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 2698. Cal. 44. Rare 7-1/2″ rnd bbl fluted Army with New York address and German silver front sight. It has full fluted cylinder with patent date in one of flutes but unfortunately no visible serial number. It has 4-screw frame cut for shoulder stock with flat head hammer screw & short stock screws. It has brass trigger guard with iron backstrap & Army size 1-pc walnut grip that is from a later 60 Army. Grip has the number “7509” in backstrap channel and is carved on bottom left “H.B. JOHNSON.” Accompanied by a Colt factory letter identifying this revolver with 7-1/2″ bbl as having been shipped April 4, 1861 to the United States Quartermaster in New York in a shipment of 300 same type guns. CONDITION: Good, all matching except wedge which is numbered “5848” and appears to be from a Navy sized revolver, the cylinder which is unnumbered and grip as noted above. Bbl retains 30-40% blue turned brown in most sheltered areas. Cylinder retains an artificially aged patina in flutes, cleaned to gray on outer diameters with a few spots of scattered fine pitting. Back of cylinder has all six safety pins prominent. Frame retains faded case colors around screws with balance turned gray. Grip frame is a light brass patina & backstrap is a silver metal color. Wedge screw & a couple of frame screws are replacements. Grip, with legible cartouches, is sound showing moderate to heavy wear and retains 50-60% of its orig finish. Mechanics are fine, strong dark bore with fine pitting. 4-33349 JR362 (1,000-2,000)

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