The Private & Personal Collection of Dr. Helga Wall-Apelt
Totals Nearly $2 Million!

Auction: March 23rd, 2015

Preview: March 22nd, 2015

Please Note: All prices include the hammer price plus the buyer’s premium, which is paid by the buyer as part of the purchase price. The prices noted here after the auction are considered unofficial and do not become official until after the 46th day.

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Image Lot
Price
Description
2

PAIR OF UNDECORATED WHITE JADE PALACE-STYLE BOWLS.

Late 18th, early 19th century, China. Nephrite: uniform pale yellowish-green. Fashioned from superior quality jade material, and characterized by everted rims, well-formed foot rings, gently swelling profiles, and finely-polished surfaces, these elegant thin-walled translucent bowls are shaped according to precedents established in porcelain for bowls associated with palace commissions. Commonly made in pairs (Watt Seattle, p. 122; Ip, p. 252, #226), such bowls are among the most popular jade forms produced for upper-class use in the 18th and 19th centuries, although there are Ming prototypes (Clunas, p. 149; Watt 2, p. 178, #152-53). Graceful, functional, and generously-sized, they are usually left undecorated so that the material may speak for itself, as here. This pair has a low polish on the interior and a high polish on the exterior. Some extant examples are reign-marked (Spink 81 , #6, with a Jiajing mark; and Keverne, p. 182, #137); some have domed lids (Kuwayama, #35); and still others come with associated jade chopsticks (Beurdeley, p. 143). Pairs of jade bowls were intended for use as dinnerware at the table of elite society, or “to serve a delicacy made of dried petals of the chrysanthemum flower soaked in wine” (Schedel, pp.104-05, #37), or as part of an altar offering suite, particularly in a Tibetan Buddhist or imperial temple context (Hartman, p. 94; Medley, p. 17). Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 3.13″ x 7.5″. (7.9 x 19.1 cm.) CONDITION: Each bowl in very good condition. One with possible repolished spot on outer foot edge rim. 9-95004 (30,000-50,000) – Lot 2

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3

FOOTED MARRIAGE BOWL WITH BAT DECOR.

Late 18th-early 19th century, China. Nephrite: grayish yellow-green (celadon). This deep, flat-bottomed bowl has four high-relief animal heads supporting independently-moving rings placed along a low-relief decor band circling the exterior; between this band and the lip, there are two small exquisitely detailed incised border bands. A well-modelled low-relief design composed of five realistically detailed bats and a floral sprig is asymmetrically disposed about the interior. The bowl, resting on four shaped short feet, has an overall low polish and is moderately translucent though it is not thinly carved. Popularly known as “marriage bowls”, these interesting and elegant containers, of which a number are known from the 18th through early 20th centuries, were produced for other auspicious occasions as well, their symbolic decor reflecting the specific nature of the event. Among the more common motifs are those associated with longevity, such as ruyi (magic fungus) (Poor, #54), marriage, such as double fish (Spink 81, #3); and good fortune and happiness, including bats (Chew, p. 90). Some bowls of greater complexity combine auspicious or seasonal imagery for a compound message (SL 6/8/82, #313). At times scenic designs are worked in relief in the base of the bowl, most having some water component (Keverne, p. 150, #52, with fish and waterweeds). Other bowls bear designs borrowed from ancient bronzes or porcelains, including dragons rhythmically progressing about the body (Kuwayama, #36, and also Foster, p. 86, #178; Keverne, p. 197, fig. 4), or floral sprigs and petals (NPM 2, #31; Keverne, p. 162, #87). It has been suggested that the five bats (a particularly auspicious number of bats) and floral sprig interior decor of this bowl indicate that it was produced for presentation upon the occasion of an 80th birthday. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 3.25″ x 7.13″. (8.3 x 18.1 cm.) CONDITION: Stone with small fissures. Very good. 9-95202 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 3

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9

TABLE SCREEN WITH LONGEVITY THEME.

Mid-late Qing Dynasty, China. Nephrite: very light greenish-gray with lesser areas of very light yellow-brown. Of rectangular shape and with sensitive relief carving on both sides, this jade table screen is an excellent example of a much prized form of the late Ming and Qing dynasties. Intended as an adornment of a scholar’s desk or presented on a free-standing table in an elegant household, such screens serve both as superb decoration, indicating the elevated status and taste of their owners, and as spur to the imagination of the contemplative viewer. Some screens depict didactic scenes of the type favored by the earlier Qing emperors (such as the rice-planting and harvesting cycle: Laing, p. 76. #16), while others depict legends (such as the Eight Horses of Mu Wang: Na, pp. 144-45, #184) and paradises. The major source of the instructional, legendary and imaginative images which appear in eighteenth century jade screens was contemporary painting and woodblock prints (Laing, p. 63). Simply cut in slab form, with plain sides intended for easy placement in the frame of the typical formal hardwood stands, this jade piece was worked intelligently with strongly diagonal lines which conceal minor flaws and reveal beautiful sections of the material. The differing levels of technical and aesthetic approaches possible among Qing jades depicting roughly similar subject matter are apparent when comparing such details as the piercing of the pine branches and roots of this work with those of others, which seem more pedestrian in their placement and overall effect. From base to top, the low-relief and incised designs of this screen depict the type of populated outdoor setting as found on other great mountains, but the work achieves its effect through minute, detailed effects carefully carved in various relief levels from the flat background. Many of the standard themes are apparent here – a rapidly moving river which foams to a wavy conclusion at the base of one side of this slab; empty pavilions awaiting guests; elders, including the God of Longevity with his staff and peach together with servants, enjoying the scenery; and emblems of longevity such as pine trees, lingzhi along one cliff face, and deer (See #40; Palm, p. 118, #118; SHK 5/20/87, #705; SPBNY 2/28/90, #231A; NPM, #46; Kuwayama, #44; Munakata, p. 172, #90). The concern with specificity even with routine forms is apparent in the animation of the deer, one cavorting joyously along the stream while the other grazes (Schedel, pp. 108-111, pl. 39-40). Both front and back contribute to the overall message of longevity and both are most successfully carved, their forms clear and the direction of flow legible. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 8.63″ x 6.38″ x .63″. (21.9 x 16.2 x 1.6 cm.) CONDITION: Well carved and polished. Very good. 9-95171 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 9

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11

ARCHAISTIC GU WITH LONGEVITY CHARACTER.

19th-early 20th century, China. Nephrite: light grayish-yellow with traces of white and brown. Inscription: One seal-script auspicious character, Shou (“Longevity”), on the side of the vessel. This gu features low-relief shou, or longevity, characters written in seal-script style calligraphy. The mingling of large scale auspicious characters with a more traditional taotie (animal mask) design on the upper portion and the blade pattern on the lower portion of the vessel exemplifies the Qing predilection for combining post-classic symbolic ideas (including auspicious characters) with traditional, classical, imagery. Other Qing jade vessels of this form bearing the shou character are known (TCJ, p. 322-23), and precedents for longevity designs are found in the later Ming period. The interior of the foot is hollowed all the way to the waistline, and the flanges are shaped like curled and stretching dragons, with eyes indicated on the archaic-form heads. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 7.13″ x 3.25″. (18.1 x 8.3 cm.) CONDITION: With natural small fissures. Good overall. 9-95192 (1,500-2,500) – Lot 11

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16

SEATED BODHIDARMA OR LUOHAN.

19th-early 20th century, China. Nephrite: light grayish yellow-green with minor gray markings. Built on an impressive scale (31 lb., 14 kg.) and sculpted with monumental simplicity, this jade image convincingly portrays a holy Buddhist figure. In facial and body type it conforms to the standard portrayals of Bodhidarma and bears a marked resemblance to the “Redrobed Bodhidarma” of the Kogakuji in Japan, in which the “robust, full-featured patriarch sits erectly, his- broad-shouldered figure emanating a strong psychological presence”, his face given a “treatment of minute details in a realistic manner…in the style of a Chinese chinso portrait” (Fontein, p. 49. #20). This unlabeled sculpture, however, also bears a resemblance to a number of late Ming-Qing images of luohan (also called rakan or arhat), disciples of the Buddha who have overcome the enemies of passion, hatred and ignorance (Smithies, p. 260). As illustrated in several of the grotto scenes in this Collection, the luohan may be depicted as a generic holy image, heavily robed with a full face, included as a member of a large set of similar, unidentifiable but certainly holy images. Often it appears as an identifiable single figure assigned a specific personal history, legends, associated attributes and vehicles, and physical appearance, or it may be included as a member of a set of identifiable luohan images, in either painting or free-standing sculpture. The type is established early, by the Song, and continues into the present day in both fine and folk art (Barling 2, p. 335, carved wood, with one knee down and one bent, as here; Wang, p. 111, #54, bamboo, mid-Qing; Markbreiter, cover photograph, modern Fukienese style sculpture; CNY 11/29/90, #196, a blanc de chine luohan with long necklace, trimmed beard, pendulous ears, and identical pose). Jade versions from the Qing are known (Keverne, p. 168, #99; Yang, p. 83, #4; and see Schedel, pp. 186-87, pl. 81, a “Buddha”), but few have the quality of stillness, and almost glowering intransigence, so eloquently depicted by this securely seated image. As is typical of many Qing and later sculptures, the fully-shaved head is disproportionately large, particularly noticeable here when compared with the size of the emerging foot. The pose of the legs is conveyed skillfully by the graceful arrangement of the soft outer robe, and the undergarment as it emerges into view on the lower torso is equally convincing. The string of rosary beads, held by the right hand and clinging to the surface of the material, is detailed with equal care. The remarkable face exhibits peculiar goateed beard fronds, deeply knit brows, staring eyes, pudgy cheeks and firmly-clenched mouth. The ears, set close to the head, are elongated, and there is almost no neck. The two-toned green material is well-polished overall. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 13.5″ x 9″ x 6″. (34.3 x 22.9 x 15.2 cm.) CONDITION: Stone with small fissures. Very good. 9-95016 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 16

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17

DAOIST PARADISE.

20th century, China. Nephrite: light greenish-gray with minor gray and brown markings and a light brown rind. Fully and deeply carved on both sides of this irregularly shaped low-polished jade block, the details provided by the workshop clearly indicate that this is indeed a shoushan, or mountain of longevity. There are lingzhi fungus nestled by the base of a small entrance into the interior cavities. Pine trees flank openings, a servant carries a calabash, and a crane poses on one leg in a grotto. An image of Laotze riding on his buffalo emerges from another deep cavity (See also Ip, p. 266, #238; Laing, p. 70, #5). The standard forms of waterfall, path, hut and bridge are well-detailed and on the reverse there are several youths clambering over the rocks. The tightness of the detail, producing a rich surface of heightened realism, and the mysterious unseen interior passages which are deeply carved contribute to the interest of this carving. The staining does not relate to any one particular area or form, but rather adds an abstract note of additional visual attraction. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 7.25″ x 6.75″ x 2.5″. (18.4 x 17.1 x 6.4 cm.) CONDITION: Variegated stone carved in deep relief. Very good. 9-95198 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 17

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23

JADE BUDDHIST MONK WITH BEGGING BOWL.

19th-20th century, China. Nephrite: light grayish yellow-green (celadon). The elongated earlobes, monk’s robe, shaved head, gentle withdrawn attitude, and alms bowl all identify this image as a Buddhist monk. While the image is presented frontally, the robes flare out to one side, and the bowl, in counterbalance, is held tenderly out to the other side. A pendant-bedecked sash is suspended from the waist. The sparely-detailed large head, with its downcast eyes and tucked-in mouth, sits directly on the shoulders. Sandal-bound feet emerge slightly from the undergarment. The material is well-polished and the undercutting expertly manipulated, providing an impression of depth in the robe. Prototypes for such figures often wear small cloth caps or display slightly more body movement, though most achieve their effect through spatial manipulation of the drapery (SL 6/8/82, #316 and Palmer, Pl. 24; Poor, #78). This is a placid, effective and substantial (15 lb., 7 kg.) presentation of a well-known Buddhist image. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 12.75″ x 6.5″ x 4.25″. (32.4 x 16.5 x 10.8 cm.) CONDITION: Small shell crack on base rim. Otherwise good. 9-95071 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 23

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43

PEACH SHAPED SEAL INK BOX WITH HINGED LID.

Ming Dynasty style, possibly mid-late Qing Dynasty, China. Nephrite: white with yellowish overtones and gray patches with brown markings. An extremely refined, well-polished work, this appealing carving features leaves, blossom, and tendrils intricately disposed over the surface of the peach-shaped box. The presentation is realistic, the natural forms being executed in an admirable variety of relief carving levels with extremely fine cross-hatching for the heart of the flower. The effectively-employed color patches lend a further touch of realism. The two halves of the box are connected by a device of interlaced stems and circle, both halves and the circular connection being carved from the same piece of jade. There are Ming precedents for this type of peach-shaped box (ACGB, p. 109, #358; Keverne, p. 143, #37), which continues to appear in the Qing (Keverne, p. 152, #61-2), but at no time is it common. Both halves are well-hollowed, and the box can function as a seal ink container, although there is no evidence that this example was ever so used. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 2″ x 5″ x 3.5″ (5.1 x 12.7 x 8.9 cm) (closed). 9.8″ w (25.1 cm) (when opened and fully extended). CONDITION: Very good. 9-95005 (8,000-12,000) – Lot 43

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44

HU WITH LOW RELIEF DECOR.

19th century, China. Nephrite: uniform, light greenish-yellow. This small hu exhibits greater respect for classical prototypes, with a softly-curving pear-shaped profile in the manner of the Eastern Zhou-early Han. Undramatic, vaguely dragon-like small-scale lugs or handles emerge at the neck zone, and the entire work is supported on a nicely-balanced discrete foot. The lip is gently shaped, matching the base of the work, and the incised and low-relief bands of traditional motifs are arranged horizontally about the work, with blade patterns at the foot and neck areas. There is no single striking design feature emerging from the work and the profile and the uniformly-colored material are much quieter. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 6.13″ x 2.25″ x 1.63″. (15.6 x 5.7 x 4.1 cm.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-95007 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 44

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159

BRONZE FIGURE OF A DANCING APSARA.

Previously sold at Christie’s New York, Sept. 2004, Sale No. 1409, lot 61 described as: Khmer, Bayon Style, late 12th/early 13th Century Finely cast dancing on an S-curved branch, wearing a flaring sarong and elaborate tiara, with an attractive green patina. 11 in. (28.5 cm.) high. SIZE: 11″ x 4″. PROVENANCE: Christie’s sale 1409, Lot 61. CONDITION: Broken off a larger element in antiquity. Good verdigris. 9-95448 (7,500-10,000) – Lot 159

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165

GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF BABY BUDDHA.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Gilt figure of the infant Buddha standing on a lotus throne with lotus engraved robes. SIZE: 4-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Rubbing to the gilt. Roughness to base rim. 9-95442 (300-500) – Lot 165

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170

BRONZE FU LION FORM CENSER.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Cast in the form of a mythical animal, Luo Dan. SIZE: 13″ h x 5″ w x 5″ l. CONDITION: Chip to one ear. Losses to hinge and leg feathers (fetlock) and to tail. 9-95423 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 170

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182

GILT BRONZE IMAGE OF PADMAPANI.

15th Century, Nepal. Seated figure in the pose of “royal ease”. Decorated as a prince with a jeweled crown, earrings, necklace, armlets, bracelets, anklets and rings inset with semi-precious stones and glass. Mounted on a 2-part double lotus throne. SIZE: 19-1/2″ h x 15″ w. CONDITION: Part of the base possibly a later addition. Stones replaced. Casting flaws and rubbing to the gilt. Halo missing. 9-95024 (16,000-18,000) – Lot 182

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184

HUNAMAN GILT COPPER NEPAL.

Sotheby’s New York, September 24th, 2004, Lot 74 described as follows: 18th Century. The five animal-headed and ten-armed tantric form of Hanuman holding ritual implements, supported by a reclining naked figure holding a kapala, on a lotus pedestal atop an inscribed cylindrical pole fitting. SIZE: 21-3/4″ h. PROVENANCE: Sotheby’s New York, Sept. 24, 2004, Lot 74. CONDITION: Surfaces with areas of old gilding. Structurally good. 9-95504 (8,000-12,000) – Lot 184

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188

TANTRIC RITUAL VESSEL.

19th century, Tibet. Kalapa of repousse silver in the form of a skull with a flame shaped base. SIZE: 5″ l x 7″ h. CONDITION: Bent out of round. 9-95101 (600-800) – Lot 188

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197

RARE GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF EKADSURALAKESHVARA.

17th/18th century, Tibet. Standing figure of the eleven head, thousand armed Ekadasuralakeshvara on a lotus and lion throne. Surfaces finely engraved with floral scrolling. Traces of red pigment on the throne. SIZE: 21-3/4″ h. CONDITION: Some areas of corrosion and wear to gilt. Otherwise very good. 9-95110 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 197

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199

BRONZE FIGURE OF GANESHA.

Previously sold at Christie’s New York, Sept. 2004, Sale No. 1409, lot 56 described as: Khmer, Angkor Period, Bayon Style, late 12th/early 13th Century. Well cast seated on a shaped plinth wearing a short sampot and armlets, his face with a humorous expression and elaborate tiara, with a rich green patina overall. SIZE: 3-1/2″ h. PROVENANCE: Christie’s sale 1409, lot 56. CONDITION: Normal rubbing & losses to gold figure, otherwise very good. 9-95510-1 (5,000-7,000) – Lot 199

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220

BRONZE KARAKO AND DRAGON CENSER.

Meiji Period (1868-1912), Japan. Bronze oviform shape with relief decoration of dragons and clouds with supports and finial cast in the form of small children. Foundry mark on the base. SIZE: 9″ h x 7″ w. CONDITION: Fan in the child’s hand is slightly bent. Good cover and patina. 9-95441 (300-500) – Lot 220

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229

JADE CARVING OF A PAIR OF MONKEYS.

19th century, China. Gray and white stone. Figures carved with a bough of peaches. SIZE: 2″ l. CONDITION: Flea bite to tip of sprig. 9-95374 (300-500) – Lot 229

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236

CARVED JADE STUDY OF TWO QUAIL.

19th, early 20th century, China. Greenish white stone with amber markings. Quail with a branch of millet. SIZE: 5-1/2″ x 4-1/2″. CONDITION: Natural fissures & inclusions. 9-95170 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 236

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258

FINELY CAST BRONZE MODEL OF A FOO LION AND CUB.

17th/18th century, China. Cast in the form of a Buddhist lion playing with a brocade ball. SIZE: 19″ x 17″. CONDITION: Undisturbed surface with good patina. 9-95477 (10,000-15,000) – Lot 258

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260

GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF INFANT BUDDHA.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Standing image of the infant Buddha in dragon embroidered robe. Sotheby’s, New York, Sept. 22, 2004 Lot 46, described as follows: The divine child standing with both index fingers on long arms pointing in opposing directions towards Heaven and Earth, naked but for an apron cast with a large writing dragon chasing a ‘flaming’ pearl, secured above his large rump by tied ribbons, his large bald head set with wide open eyes and impish smile. Notes: Depictions of Sakyamuni as a child, pointing to the sky with his left index finger and to the ground with his right, do not yet show the usnisa, the protruberance of the skull, which is perhaps the most important of the thirty-two outward signs of a Buddha, since this is considered the one that was acquired last. A similar figure wearing a flower-decorated apron in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, is illustrated in Ren?Yvon Lefebvre d’Argenc? Chinese, Korean and Japanese Sculpture in the Avery Brundage Collection, San Francisco, 1974, pl.185, where the textual origin of the iconography, related to the first Seven Steps of Buddha Sakyamuni, is discussed. SIZE: 9″ h. PROVENANCE: Sotheby’s New York, Sept. 22, 2004 Lot 46. CONDITION: Rubbing to the gilt. 9-95100 (8,000-12,000) – Lot 260

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261

HU FORM BRONZE WINE JAR.

Sung to Ming Period, China. Surface decorated with a bovine projection and tao tieh mask handles. Body inlaid with gold and silver with pi disks, chevrons and a band of scrolling demons. Archaic inscription in the base. SIZE: 12″ x 8-1/2″. CONDITION: Shows wear & tarnish, some scuff marks. 9-95189 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 261

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262

PARCEL GILT BRONZE BUDDHA.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Figure of Avalokiteshvara in princely jewels seated on a four tiered lotus throne. Figure with a parcel gilt surface. Throne red and gold lacquered. SIZE: 20″ x 13″. CONDITION: Casting flaws. Wear to painted surfaces of base. 9-95037 (5,000-7,000) – Lot 262

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263

GILT BRONZE STANDING FIGURE OF MANJUSHRI.

Probably Nepal, 17th C or earlier. Robed figure of Manjushri with headdress on plinth. SIZE: Statue: 13-1/2″ h. Overall: 17-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Wear to gilded surfaces, otherwise very good. 9-95105 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 263

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373
Revised: 3/6/2015

There are minor old areas of roughness or abrasion

CARVED ROCK CRYSTAL CENSER.

Early 20th century, China. Fluorite shading from an amethyst color to green. Foo dog finials, handles and feet. Accompanied by fitted stand. SIZE: 4-1/2 x 6″. CONDITION: Very good. 9-95466 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 373

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374

BRUSH POT.

20th century, China. Pi tung of carved greenish white jade. Surface with scampering chih lung. SIZE: 7-3/4″ x 5″ h. CONDITION: Very good. 9-95069 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 374

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