The Private & Personal Collection of Dr. Helga Wall-Apelt
Totals Nearly $2 Million!

Auction: March 23rd, 2015

Preview: March 22nd, 2015

Please Note: All prices include the hammer price plus the buyer’s premium, which is paid by the buyer as part of the purchase price. The prices noted here after the auction are considered unofficial and do not become official until after the 46th day.

If you have questions please email antiques@jamesdjulia.com.


| Click here to view prices realized column

Image Lot
Price
Description
1
Revised: 3/6/2015

There is a very small and minor old area of abrasian

ARCHAISTIC CHIMERA COUPE.

Mid-Late Qing Dynasty, China. Nephrite: light yellow-green (celadon) with brown patches. There is a lengthy history behind this type of animal coupe, from the Eastern Han (Beijing, #94), through post-Han (Green, p. 34; ACGB, #178, #185), through the Ming, when “Water pots of this type are mentioned in every notebook by later Ming scholars …” (Watt 2, p. 132, #109; and see also Spink, #163; Hai, p. 105, #105, a Freer example). It appears for the same “scholar’s desk” purpose in the Qing (Poor, #7). Over the centuries it has been fashioned from a variety of materials, most often bronze and hardstones. Attempts to definitively name the beast have brought about a number of designations, including bixie (usually, if not accurately, translated as “chimera”), or simply, “mythical beast” or “winged fabulous animal”. Although there are slight variations on the animal’s form, it is generally distinguished by the double horns behind large eyebrows (which may be striated), the bared teeth, a crouching flattened body which may be strongly sculpted, sprawling back feet, and bifid (or, “bifurcated”) tail. The fur may be indicated by hatching or, as here, by small star-like incised marks to either side of the sculpted opening in the back. When used as a water container, the beast has a hole in the back, and an open mouth which sometimes has a cup-like appendage such as a bei, or “eared” cup (BSL, p.13, #9). There may be a round or mushroom form lid for the hole. The hole on this example is a slightly undercut drilled tubular shape, and the body itself is not hollowed out. This water coupe possesses the standard physical attributes, and exhibits as well a rather winsome expression, heightened by color added to the eye area. A strange striated necktie-like tongue (?) lies flat along the belly. The work is hard to date, since the tradition for such forms survives over a succession of centuries, but the particular material and finish indicate a mid- or late-Qing date. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 2″ x 6″ x 3.5″. (5.1 x 15.2 x 8.9 cm.) CONDITION: With natural fissures. Flea bites to edge of left ear. Otherwise good. 9-95079 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 1

Have a similar item you want to sell?

2

PAIR OF UNDECORATED WHITE JADE PALACE-STYLE BOWLS.

Late 18th, early 19th century, China. Nephrite: uniform pale yellowish-green. Fashioned from superior quality jade material, and characterized by everted rims, well-formed foot rings, gently swelling profiles, and finely-polished surfaces, these elegant thin-walled translucent bowls are shaped according to precedents established in porcelain for bowls associated with palace commissions. Commonly made in pairs (Watt Seattle, p. 122; Ip, p. 252, #226), such bowls are among the most popular jade forms produced for upper-class use in the 18th and 19th centuries, although there are Ming prototypes (Clunas, p. 149; Watt 2, p. 178, #152-53). Graceful, functional, and generously-sized, they are usually left undecorated so that the material may speak for itself, as here. This pair has a low polish on the interior and a high polish on the exterior. Some extant examples are reign-marked (Spink 81 , #6, with a Jiajing mark; and Keverne, p. 182, #137); some have domed lids (Kuwayama, #35); and still others come with associated jade chopsticks (Beurdeley, p. 143). Pairs of jade bowls were intended for use as dinnerware at the table of elite society, or “to serve a delicacy made of dried petals of the chrysanthemum flower soaked in wine” (Schedel, pp.104-05, #37), or as part of an altar offering suite, particularly in a Tibetan Buddhist or imperial temple context (Hartman, p. 94; Medley, p. 17). Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 3.13″ x 7.5″. (7.9 x 19.1 cm.) CONDITION: Each bowl in very good condition. One with possible repolished spot on outer foot edge rim. 9-95004 (30,000-50,000) – Lot 2

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

3

FOOTED MARRIAGE BOWL WITH BAT DECOR.

Late 18th-early 19th century, China. Nephrite: grayish yellow-green (celadon). This deep, flat-bottomed bowl has four high-relief animal heads supporting independently-moving rings placed along a low-relief decor band circling the exterior; between this band and the lip, there are two small exquisitely detailed incised border bands. A well-modelled low-relief design composed of five realistically detailed bats and a floral sprig is asymmetrically disposed about the interior. The bowl, resting on four shaped short feet, has an overall low polish and is moderately translucent though it is not thinly carved. Popularly known as “marriage bowls”, these interesting and elegant containers, of which a number are known from the 18th through early 20th centuries, were produced for other auspicious occasions as well, their symbolic decor reflecting the specific nature of the event. Among the more common motifs are those associated with longevity, such as ruyi (magic fungus) (Poor, #54), marriage, such as double fish (Spink 81, #3); and good fortune and happiness, including bats (Chew, p. 90). Some bowls of greater complexity combine auspicious or seasonal imagery for a compound message (SL 6/8/82, #313). At times scenic designs are worked in relief in the base of the bowl, most having some water component (Keverne, p. 150, #52, with fish and waterweeds). Other bowls bear designs borrowed from ancient bronzes or porcelains, including dragons rhythmically progressing about the body (Kuwayama, #36, and also Foster, p. 86, #178; Keverne, p. 197, fig. 4), or floral sprigs and petals (NPM 2, #31; Keverne, p. 162, #87). It has been suggested that the five bats (a particularly auspicious number of bats) and floral sprig interior decor of this bowl indicate that it was produced for presentation upon the occasion of an 80th birthday. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 3.25″ x 7.13″. (8.3 x 18.1 cm.) CONDITION: Stone with small fissures. Very good. 9-95202 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 3

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

4

ARCHAISTIC CONG.

Late 18th, early 19th century, China. Nephrite: light grayish-yellow with prominent granular band of green. One of the most familiar shapes in Chinese art, the cong appears at least as early as the Neolithic era. In newly excavated sites of the Liangzhu Culture, datable to at least 4,800 years ago, many cong have been recovered. (Yeung, pl. 1. #10, and p. 184; AOC, pp. 124-6; Johnson, p. 9, and #17; and HKM, “Jades” discussion, a nine-cornered tall example from Tinglin). The cong is a prominent form among the jades of the Shang and Zhou periods, and appears repeatedly in revival works of later eras, notably the Sung, Ming, and Qing, in a variety of media. Its exact significance as a ritual work has intrigued writers from antiquity to the modern era, and while many theories as to how it was actually used have been offered (Teng; Berglund), few seem fully satisfactory. The shape is essentially a circle within a square, the height of the tubal configuration differing with the age of the piece. Animal parts, including “thick-browed, round-eyed, wide-mouthed, longfanged-monster-design” masks may be engraved on each raised face of cong with articulated zones (Johnson, p. 9; Keverne, p. 53, #7, a Liangzhu cong with human facial features incised on the angled corners; and see ACGB, p. 32, #39, an Eastern Zhou work with incised lines and circle decor; and NPM, #7, a Zhou work with five corner “frets”). This massive (11 lb., 5 kg) cong has eleven layers of angled corners and a shaped central opening. Gouge marks are visible on the border of each of the angled corners. There are no animal or human features incised on the corners; rather, it is left to the richly-mottled material itself to enliven the surface. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 9.25″ x 4.5″ x 4.38″. (23.5 x 11.4 x 11.1 cm.) CONDITION: Chip in side, Natural stone fissure cracks throughout. 9-95160 (2,000-4,000) – Lot 4

Have a similar item you want to sell?

5

INKSTONE WITH ANIMAL MASK.

19th-early 20th century, China. Jadeite: Mottled light to dark green with micaceous inclusions. Inscription: Apocryphal Qianlong Reign mark, with date to Autumn of the Third Year of the Reign, and “Treasure of the Old Gentleman of Stones”. Like brushes, inkstones were a prized possession of a Chinese scholar, and depending on his heritage, he might have a number of inkstones handed down from previous generations of his family, or, if such a happy circumstance did not prevail, might be able to acquire older inkstones. lnkstones are made in a variety of materials, including ceramic and metal, but most are carved from some type of stone, those fashioned from the famed Tuan stone being particularly revered. Some are inscribed or decorated on front and possibly the reverse; others are left plain. The ancestry of the inkstone, its materials, its shape and designs, and its efficacy in action, as a medium through which ink can be ground and retained for use, are all important qualities to consider in inkstone connoisseurship. This inkstone is a later product of Chinese culture, and because of the richness of its material, was probably intended for presentation upon some appropriate occasion. The design is low-key, two stylized confronting dragons with a pearl between them carved at the top of the stone with a simple incised line running around the frame of the stone. The rectangular hold area itself is undecorated, though the material furnishes not only some patterning but also a nubby texture. The shape is straightforward and practical and the work large enough to serve not only as inkstone, but also palette or paperweight (See also examples in Foster, p. 83, #133; Keverne, p. 180, #131: Palm, p. 121, #125; and Moss, pp. 264-65, #130). Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: .75″ x 7.75″ x 5.5″. (1.9 x 19.7 x 14 cm.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-95480 (300-500) – Lot 5

Have a similar item you want to sell?

6

BODHIDARMA RIDING ON WAVES.

Late 19th-early 20th century, China. Nephrite: light greenish-gray. An Indian Buddhist who came to China in the sixth century a.d., during the formative years of Chinese Buddhism, Bodhidarma’s life, legend, and influence upon East Asian religion have been the subject of many books. The twenty-eighth and last patriarch of the Indian Buddhist school, he became known as the first Chinese Buddhist Patriarch, and the founder of Chan, or Zen, Buddhism. One of the favorite images in East Asian religious art, this religious leader appears in a variety of situations based on both his actual biography and on the legends which have built up about him. Bodhidarma, or “Damo”, as he is known in Chinese (“Daruma” in Japanese) often is portrayed in his role as patriarch, accepting disciples or handing over the reins of religious leadership to the next generation. Another common pose finds him sitting in meditation, directly facing the viewer or – reflecting the physical circumstances of a popular legend – turned to face a cave wall in meditation, a practice he is said to have continued for nine years. This jade sculpture portrays the famous figure in one of the popular legendary scenes associated with his life, that’s titled “Bodhidarma Crossing the Yangtze on a Reed”. Said to date back to the 13th century, this theme has been represented in diverse media, including Dehua ceramics, textiles, paintings, and hardstones (Fontein, #22, pp. 53-6). At times, as here, the reed is absent, and the patriarch seems to skim across the roiling waves directly and with the greatest of ease, his movement conveyed by his robes sweeping off to one side. Whatever the pose or situation, there are certain factors related to physiognomy and body type which are routinely associated with Bodhidarma in the art of later periods. The patriarch, being of lndian origin, usually is given a non-Chinese appearance including a heavy, jowly face with a low stubble or shaped short beard and elongate earlobes (a feature borrowed from images of the Buddha) from which large loop earrings may be suspended. Protruding, staring eyes are set deeply under heavy eyebrows, and the relatively squat, often hairy-torsoed, body is enveloped in a full robe which may be extended to cover his head. The imposing head may be either partially (as here) or fully shaved. The facial expression varies only slightly, from introspective to “truculent” (Fontein, p. 51), and at no time is the figure physically attractive, although his powerful personality is conveyed convincingly. Associated attributes may include discarded straw sandals, rush mats, rosary beads, or bowing acolytes. In this slightly polished, flat-based and uniformly-toned jade portrayal of Bodhidarma, the severe-looking figure skims across the carefully delineated roiling waves. To convey motion and weight, the jade carver has undercut the waves and robe deeply. The relatively slim figure (a Chinese mode adopted in Ming and Qing art, including Dehua porcelain portrayals: Scott, p. 68, #38; Chait, p. 3) stands securely on the waves, his arms folded under the robe, and his face staring out at the viewer. Facial features are clearly and crisply depicted, and there is extensive drill work used to portray the curling locks rimming the ear and neck. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 10.5″ x 3.25″ x 2.75″. (26.7 x 8.3 x 7 cm.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-95002 (5,000-7,000) – Lot 6

Have a similar item you want to sell?

7

EWER WITH CHAIN AND LONGEVITY CHARACTER.

Mid-Later Qing Dynasty, China. Nephrite: medium greenish-yellow. Inscription: One seal-script auspicious character, shou (“Longevity”), on the side of the vessel. The ancestry of the body of this graceful work might be traced to the bronze hu of late Zhou-early Han in the essential proportions of the ewer’s body, but the overall configuration is strongly related to Persian metal prototypes. During the Ming period, examples appear in several media, including metal, cloisonne, and ceramic (Gyllensvard, p. 64, #67, a Ming silver ewer, dated to the 16th century). Though rare, there are also Ming jades of this form, such as the early 16th century green nephrite ewer excavated from the Shenzong Emperor’s tomb which, according to Watt, appears related in date and workmanship to an example from the “Northern School” of jade carving now in the Seattle Art Museum (Watt Seattle, p. 114, #96). Later Ming jade versions of the ewer with longevity motifs including Shouxing (the God of Longevity) and the Eight Immortals are known (Keverne, p. 140, #31), indicating that the association of longevity symbolism and the ewer form, as encountered in this graceful work from the Yangtze River Collection, has precursors in previous centuries. The ewer form continued from the Ming into the Qing, with variations on the basic decor: there might be a contained space within which designs of auspicious or more general vegetative import are contained, or decor might be more generally distributed across the surface. An elaboration of the chain motif overcomes many of the very late Qing and early modern works. The Seattle ewer dated by Watt to the late Ming has a peach-shaped double line “flame” with an interior design of floral sprays, and space for stone indentation in the style of Mughal hardstone carving. The present ewer has a very similar cartouche area, with a low-relief design representing an auspicious character and musical stone, not unlike a 18th century example published by Keverne (Keverne, p. 170. #106; see also p. 140, #31, a covered Ming ewer with longevity motifs). The body of the present ewer has a low-polished surface with the major decor area (consisting of a longevity character, a lotus, and a swastika) located on the low swelling belly. The handle is angular, reflecting metal work, and the spout, joined to the body with a disc, is gracefully curved with a bulbous base adorned with an upward-facing animal head in refined low relief. The simply-shaped foot is small but secure. The curved lid has a graceful lotus-bud knob, linked by a functional chain to the top of the handle. The form is well-shaped, its component parts organized in harmonious proportion one to another. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 10″ x 6.5″ x 2.75″. (25.4 x 16.5 x 7 cm.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-94925 (5,000-6,000) – Lot 7

Have a similar item you want to sell?

8

ARCHAISTIC “HERO VASE”.

20th century, China. Nephrite: Light yellow-green (celadon) with brown patches. The name of this popular double-cylindered shape, “hero” or “champion” vase, is based on the punning possibilities inherent in the Chinese language. The sounds for the two main decorative motifs of this shape are ying (an eagle) and xiong (a bear), which collectively have the same sound as the compound phrase ying xiong (“hero”), although the written characters are entirely different. The vase is said to have been “given as rewards for military prowess” (Cox, fig. 762), or as a trophy “to winners of sportive contests” (D’Argence, p. 74). The form is ancient, datable back to at least the Western Han, where bronze examples have been uncovered in recently excavated tombs of known date (Watt 2, pp. 156-57; Kerr, pp. 226-27). There have been suggestions of foreign influence on the shape, including a possible Sassanian influence (Gure, p. 156), although that would surely post-date the form’s earliest appearance in China. Watt suggests that the name appears more recent than the form itself (Watt 2, pp. 156-57; and Kerr 2, p. 76). Though the earliest known hero vases are in bronze, the form was translated into hardstone and other materials at least as early as the Song (Gure, pl. 32, #la-b; Green, p. 35, a Sackler example, dated here 11th-12th century: ACGB, p. 99, #320, the same Sackler work, dated 13th-15th century; Watt 2, p. 156, #108, St. Louis example, 12th-13th century; D’Argence, p. 74, dated 10th-13th century; Hai 2, p. 182, #180, a Cleveland version with squat proportions). Later metal versions and occasionally a rhinoceros horn example (SNY 6/3/92, #103) as well as a plethora of jade versions appear in the Ming and Qing (Poor, #64; Kerr, p. 193; CNY 11/27/91, #176, all said to be of the Qianlong period). Hardstone versions from the 19th century are not uncommon (SPBNY 2/28/80, #266). Although the name implies an eagle and bear combination, the later jade versions ofren sport other beasts: the eagle may become more like a puffy quail, sharp-eyed falcon, or elaborately-feathered phoenix. The bear, if present, may be represented only by an indistinct squat creature upon which the major protagonist-a dragon, bird or feline-stands and stretches up the sides of the cylinders. The shape usually includes a connecting link between the double cylinders at the base and possibly on or just below the lip; there may be one joined or two individual lids, perhaps with an animal knob. In more cunning and/or later works, the animals’ posteriors are presented in full round on the reverse, and the base “bear” squats under the central space between the cylinders to emerge at the front, while the dragon or feline may curl sinuously through upper reaches of that space to emerge at the front and rise up towards or even over the top of the cylinders. There may be extremely elaborate shaping of the various creatures, and attached ring handles suspended from mouths or beaks. The carver may have been able to suggest a definite personality for each of the creatures. The dragon may be winged and restless, the bird may look stately or aggressive, the bear downtrodden and displeased. Later works, as might be expected, are more detailed in their presentation of the creatures, and the wings of the dragon or bird often become prominent design elements in their own right. In this hero vase, the bi-colored material makes an important contribution to the overall appearance of the work, and the creatures are strongly sculptural. The lowest of the creatures squats, its limbs akimbo at an acute angle on both front and reverse, and it appears to have a lengthy tail and marked rib area as well as wing-like appurtenances on the elbows of the front paws. A dragon, its thin legs extended and tail joined in a freeform loop with the base creature, strides across and up the reverse of the vase, attempting to grasp the pearl affixed to the neck. On the front, a fancifully winged bird (perhaps a phoenix) with a diving bird headdress, well-developed wing feathers and drum-stick legs perched on the base creature’s head, grasps an independently-moving ring in its beak. The lid is compound, the two cylinder caps united by a well-sculpted dragon and cloud combination on the top. The cylinders themselves are strongly indented at the base and neck, with flanking incised key fret designs which are found also on the base of the lids. Further incised lines, on the lower portions of the cylinders, echo the graceful wings of the bird. The informality of the bi-colored jade material combines harmoniously with the formally-disciplined shape, and the work overall is pleasingly proportioned. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 9″ x 5.38″ x 3.75″. (22.9 x 13.7 x 9.5 cm.) CONDITION: Stone with small fissures. Very good. 9-95001 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 8

Have a similar item you want to sell?

9

TABLE SCREEN WITH LONGEVITY THEME.

Mid-late Qing Dynasty, China. Nephrite: very light greenish-gray with lesser areas of very light yellow-brown. Of rectangular shape and with sensitive relief carving on both sides, this jade table screen is an excellent example of a much prized form of the late Ming and Qing dynasties. Intended as an adornment of a scholar’s desk or presented on a free-standing table in an elegant household, such screens serve both as superb decoration, indicating the elevated status and taste of their owners, and as spur to the imagination of the contemplative viewer. Some screens depict didactic scenes of the type favored by the earlier Qing emperors (such as the rice-planting and harvesting cycle: Laing, p. 76. #16), while others depict legends (such as the Eight Horses of Mu Wang: Na, pp. 144-45, #184) and paradises. The major source of the instructional, legendary and imaginative images which appear in eighteenth century jade screens was contemporary painting and woodblock prints (Laing, p. 63). Simply cut in slab form, with plain sides intended for easy placement in the frame of the typical formal hardwood stands, this jade piece was worked intelligently with strongly diagonal lines which conceal minor flaws and reveal beautiful sections of the material. The differing levels of technical and aesthetic approaches possible among Qing jades depicting roughly similar subject matter are apparent when comparing such details as the piercing of the pine branches and roots of this work with those of others, which seem more pedestrian in their placement and overall effect. From base to top, the low-relief and incised designs of this screen depict the type of populated outdoor setting as found on other great mountains, but the work achieves its effect through minute, detailed effects carefully carved in various relief levels from the flat background. Many of the standard themes are apparent here – a rapidly moving river which foams to a wavy conclusion at the base of one side of this slab; empty pavilions awaiting guests; elders, including the God of Longevity with his staff and peach together with servants, enjoying the scenery; and emblems of longevity such as pine trees, lingzhi along one cliff face, and deer (See #40; Palm, p. 118, #118; SHK 5/20/87, #705; SPBNY 2/28/90, #231A; NPM, #46; Kuwayama, #44; Munakata, p. 172, #90). The concern with specificity even with routine forms is apparent in the animation of the deer, one cavorting joyously along the stream while the other grazes (Schedel, pp. 108-111, pl. 39-40). Both front and back contribute to the overall message of longevity and both are most successfully carved, their forms clear and the direction of flow legible. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 8.63″ x 6.38″ x .63″. (21.9 x 16.2 x 1.6 cm.) CONDITION: Well carved and polished. Very good. 9-95171 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 9

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

10

ARCHAISTIC ZUN WITH HIGH-RELIEF HEADS.

20th century, China. Nephrite: Medium yellow-green with light and darker patches. A broader version of the gu form, with a similar three-fold vertical division of decor, and foot and neck curvatures, but with a wide waist band and generally a larger overall dimension, the zun is another useful and graceful form incorporated into the Qing jade workshop repertoire. Characteristic of the late Shang and Zhou periods, the zun can be impressively sized, and may come in pairs, often as part of an altar garniture set. This stately (14.3 lb.) version retains elements of the flanged profile characteristic of some early Zhou versions, together with the bold proportioning symptomatic of that period. The emphatic animal heads (which here have no function apart from decoration) as well as the large-scale and boldly patterned taotie and bird decor are also found in the early Zhou. As with a late Qing square zun based on 10th century b.c. prototypes, now in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, this work should be considered “more an adaptation than an imitation” (D’Argence, p. 126, #LVI). Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 10.63″ x 8.5″. (27 x 21.6 cm.) CONDITION: Minor roughness to edge of top rim. Very good. 9-94995 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 10

Have a similar item you want to sell?

11

ARCHAISTIC GU WITH LONGEVITY CHARACTER.

19th-early 20th century, China. Nephrite: light grayish-yellow with traces of white and brown. Inscription: One seal-script auspicious character, Shou (“Longevity”), on the side of the vessel. This gu features low-relief shou, or longevity, characters written in seal-script style calligraphy. The mingling of large scale auspicious characters with a more traditional taotie (animal mask) design on the upper portion and the blade pattern on the lower portion of the vessel exemplifies the Qing predilection for combining post-classic symbolic ideas (including auspicious characters) with traditional, classical, imagery. Other Qing jade vessels of this form bearing the shou character are known (TCJ, p. 322-23), and precedents for longevity designs are found in the later Ming period. The interior of the foot is hollowed all the way to the waistline, and the flanges are shaped like curled and stretching dragons, with eyes indicated on the archaic-form heads. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 7.13″ x 3.25″. (18.1 x 8.3 cm.) CONDITION: With natural small fissures. Good overall. 9-95192 (1,500-2,500) – Lot 11

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

12

TWO WRIST RESTS IN BAMBOO FORM.

20th century, China. Nephrite: mottled dark green. Inscription: Four-character incised inscription on the front of each, reading “Treasure for use for generations”. This pair of relatively thick wrist rests in the form of bamboo sections might be used as ink beds or paper weights. The bamboo section is a favorite design for arm and wrist rests (Keverne, p. 213, #7; Spink 2, #103), since by nature its form is cylindrical, suiting the needs of the purpose for which it was intended. The convex sides of these two are carved in low relief with bamboo fronds, node marks and culm dots, while the reverse, concave, sides are plain. There is a high polish overall except amidst the interstices of the bamboo design. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 10.88″ x 1.88″ x 1.125″. (27.6 x 4.8 x 3.2 cm.) CONDITION: Each well carved mottled spinach green example in good condition. 9-95543 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 12

Have a similar item you want to sell?

13

ARCHAISTIC GU.

Late 18th/19th century, China. Nephrite: pale yellowish-green with light to dark brown streaks. Both ceramic and bronze examples of the gu are known from the late neolithic period. By the Anyang phase of Shang culture it had evolved into a classically graceful, useful, and versatile form, one much imitated in diverse media in later centuries. The gu is a frequent member of altar furniture and garniture sets, when it may be referred to as beakers. A gu is composed of a moderately wide and secure foot (which may or may not be shaped and rather high), a gently decreasing lower belly flowing into a well-defined waist, succeeded by a gently increasing upper belly and shoulder area which curves without interruption into the neck and lip. Depending on the period and production locale, the lip may be mildly or more extremely everted. The concave profile is often emphasized by the flanges which rise from foot to lip. Lids are not traditionally associated with the shape. If it is a marked separate feature, the foot may be decorated with a band of design; decor bands also may ring the lower belly and the waist, with “blade” or “cicada” shapes rising from the waist into the shoulder-neck zone, or descending from the waist into the foot area. This jade gu is true to the spirit of the Shang bronze versions in its use of a continuous profile with articulated flanges, but the flanges have become playful floral scrolls, a late development, and the form overall is square rather than circular in shape, which has caused some observers to dub it a zun rather than a gu. The incised dragon decor, the finished edges, and the double-bordered relief designs are well executed. The interior of the foot is hollowed to the waist-line, a treatment found also on the gu. The upper part of this vessel has a mottled appearance, with ribbons of dark color running through the otherwise light green body, lending the otherwise formal work a degree of informality. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 9.38″ x 4″. (23.8 x 10.2 cm.) CONDITION: Small triangular chip at corner of foot rim. 9-95191 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 13

Have a similar item you want to sell?

14

PILLOW IN FORM OF LOTUS-DRAPED BOY.

18th-19th century, China. Jadeite(?): pale greenish-yellow with brown fractures and added color. Pillows in the form of small boys are found in ceramic and hardstone form from the Sung period on, but during the later Qing period there was an explosion of interest in, and production of, jade pillows shaped like kneeling boys holding objects of symbolic import. Both pairs and single images of this form are known in jadeite and nephrite. The general shape is that of a kneeling boy, feet tucked up under his hips, arms crossed with hands resting on opposite shoulders, and head up and looking straight ahead. Often the boy wears only a stomacher (belly warmer) or a lotus leaf, but in some examples he may be more fully dressed, in jacket and leggings (Palm, p. 52, #39). One or both hands may hold a sheng (mouth organ), a lotus (SHK 11/18/86, #193), a ruyi (magic fungus) (Keverne, p. 8, #2), or other objects such as a bird (Gump, p. 159). There may be bracelet pairs encircling wrists and ankles, and on some technically spectacular pillows of this type, this jewellery may revolve independently. The boy’s head may have hair assembled into a top knot (or top knots), or there may be a lotus cap. As well as being functional, the boy bedecked with a lotus and mouth organs (as here) symbolizes an important rebus, the wish for “continuous birth of noble sons”. This is based on the homophones lien and sheng, “lotus” and “mouth organ”, which are akin verbally to the lien and sheng of “continuous birth” (Barth, fig. 13). The felicity of thought accords with the typically blissful smile on the boys’ faces. It is unlikely that this work ever served as a pillow, since the effective space available for a head is only about 3.5″ (8.9 cm) wide. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 7″ x 7.88″ x 3″. (17.8 x 20 x 7.6 cm.) CONDITION: Stone with variegated russet inclusions and multiple natural fissures. Good polished surfaces. 9-95075 (2,000-3,500) – Lot 14

Have a similar item you want to sell?

15

ROTUND BRUSH WASHER WITH DECOR OF HIGH-RELIEF IMMATURE DRAGONS.

20th century, China. Nephrite: pale yellowish-green (celadon) with brown patches. Like three other examples from this collection, the exterior of this massive (28 lb., 12 kg.) brushwasher features dragon decor. The sinuous, simple immature dragons crawl around and up the bowl, some with paws and snouts emerging at the otherwise plain edge. Overall, it is a far simpler work than other examples in this collection. The surface against which the dragons crawl is undecorated, although there are fungal-style low relief cloud forms at the top, and there is an overall high polish. Both the style and the material are reminiscent of the “hero vase” from this collection. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 6″ x 13.38″ x 11.25″. (15.2 x 34 x 28.6 cm.) CONDITION: Variegated stone with pronounced fissures on interior. Good overall. 9-95014 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 15

Have a similar item you want to sell?

16

SEATED BODHIDARMA OR LUOHAN.

19th-early 20th century, China. Nephrite: light grayish yellow-green with minor gray markings. Built on an impressive scale (31 lb., 14 kg.) and sculpted with monumental simplicity, this jade image convincingly portrays a holy Buddhist figure. In facial and body type it conforms to the standard portrayals of Bodhidarma and bears a marked resemblance to the “Redrobed Bodhidarma” of the Kogakuji in Japan, in which the “robust, full-featured patriarch sits erectly, his- broad-shouldered figure emanating a strong psychological presence”, his face given a “treatment of minute details in a realistic manner…in the style of a Chinese chinso portrait” (Fontein, p. 49. #20). This unlabeled sculpture, however, also bears a resemblance to a number of late Ming-Qing images of luohan (also called rakan or arhat), disciples of the Buddha who have overcome the enemies of passion, hatred and ignorance (Smithies, p. 260). As illustrated in several of the grotto scenes in this Collection, the luohan may be depicted as a generic holy image, heavily robed with a full face, included as a member of a large set of similar, unidentifiable but certainly holy images. Often it appears as an identifiable single figure assigned a specific personal history, legends, associated attributes and vehicles, and physical appearance, or it may be included as a member of a set of identifiable luohan images, in either painting or free-standing sculpture. The type is established early, by the Song, and continues into the present day in both fine and folk art (Barling 2, p. 335, carved wood, with one knee down and one bent, as here; Wang, p. 111, #54, bamboo, mid-Qing; Markbreiter, cover photograph, modern Fukienese style sculpture; CNY 11/29/90, #196, a blanc de chine luohan with long necklace, trimmed beard, pendulous ears, and identical pose). Jade versions from the Qing are known (Keverne, p. 168, #99; Yang, p. 83, #4; and see Schedel, pp. 186-87, pl. 81, a “Buddha”), but few have the quality of stillness, and almost glowering intransigence, so eloquently depicted by this securely seated image. As is typical of many Qing and later sculptures, the fully-shaved head is disproportionately large, particularly noticeable here when compared with the size of the emerging foot. The pose of the legs is conveyed skillfully by the graceful arrangement of the soft outer robe, and the undergarment as it emerges into view on the lower torso is equally convincing. The string of rosary beads, held by the right hand and clinging to the surface of the material, is detailed with equal care. The remarkable face exhibits peculiar goateed beard fronds, deeply knit brows, staring eyes, pudgy cheeks and firmly-clenched mouth. The ears, set close to the head, are elongated, and there is almost no neck. The two-toned green material is well-polished overall. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 13.5″ x 9″ x 6″. (34.3 x 22.9 x 15.2 cm.) CONDITION: Stone with small fissures. Very good. 9-95016 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 16

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

17

DAOIST PARADISE.

20th century, China. Nephrite: light greenish-gray with minor gray and brown markings and a light brown rind. Fully and deeply carved on both sides of this irregularly shaped low-polished jade block, the details provided by the workshop clearly indicate that this is indeed a shoushan, or mountain of longevity. There are lingzhi fungus nestled by the base of a small entrance into the interior cavities. Pine trees flank openings, a servant carries a calabash, and a crane poses on one leg in a grotto. An image of Laotze riding on his buffalo emerges from another deep cavity (See also Ip, p. 266, #238; Laing, p. 70, #5). The standard forms of waterfall, path, hut and bridge are well-detailed and on the reverse there are several youths clambering over the rocks. The tightness of the detail, producing a rich surface of heightened realism, and the mysterious unseen interior passages which are deeply carved contribute to the interest of this carving. The staining does not relate to any one particular area or form, but rather adds an abstract note of additional visual attraction. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 7.25″ x 6.75″ x 2.5″. (18.4 x 17.1 x 6.4 cm.) CONDITION: Variegated stone carved in deep relief. Very good. 9-95198 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 17

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

18

BAMBOO BRUSH OR SCROLL HOLDER.

Late 18th, 19th century, China. Nephrite: very pale yellow-green with light brown markings. Inscription: Title, “Autumn Fresh and Cool”, followed by reign date and cyclical Bingwu year of the Qianlong reign, and name of carver with a seal. Of remarkable size and realistic appearance, this imposing (42 lb., 19 kg.) three-part jade brushholder is large enough to hold scrolls as well as bigger brushes. The left-hand, tallest stalk is also the most upright; the central one appears gently squeezed between the two outer stalks and its color is fresher than the left-hand stalk; the third, with a stalk barely emerging from fresh growth roots, leans away from the group at a sharp angle. Freely carved and high-relief bamboo leaves decorate the well-polished work, and the nodes and circular marks on the culm are carefully detailed. The convincing depiction of this popular form is typical of the mid-late Qing taste for realism in botanical subject matter (Keveme, p. 151, fig. 57). The symbol of an upright gentleman, bamboo is an appropriate subject for articles associated with a scholar’s studio. Choice sections of the actual plant itself often are used as brushholders. Bamboo is also one of the most common decorative arts designs from the Sung period on. Considered among the more challenging subjects for painters, the appearance of bamboo in differing conditions and states of growth has been the subject of intense scrutiny by those determined to capture its form through brush and ink. Although small jade carvings of the subject are known (Spink, #129), works of this size in jade are unusual (Palm, p. 81, #76, a bamboo-form vase dated Ming-Qing, 27.9 cm. h.). The lack of emphasis on extended symbolic messages, such as longevity, which are found on many contemporary jade bamboo carvings (CNY 11/29/90, #3 18, double bamboo vase with peach, crane and lingzhi; Spink 81, #11, bamboo-form vase with phoenix and lingzhi) also distinguishes this carving, which otherwise reflects both later Qing taste and the possibilities afforded jade workshops by the increased size of jade material available after the mid-Qing. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 16″ x 14″ x 5″. (40.6 x 35.6 x 12.7 cm.) CONDITION: Natural fissures throughout. Very good. 9-94914 (30,000-50,000) – Lot 18

Have a similar item you want to sell?

19

PAIR OF MASSIVE SCREENS WITH LANDSCAPE DESIGN.

20th century, China. Nephrite: uneven medium “spinach” green with distinct streaking and patches. Of compelling size and color, these impressive screens are carved on the front in low to medium relief with landscape scenes of deep mountains into which are set a number of temple buildings sheltered in pine forests. Closely imitating landscape painting, the shallow relief and incised designs on the reverse depict a continuously receding series of enormously high mountain ranges. The oval discs, which have a finished plain border, are supported by a framework of large pine needle buttresses, inserted into modern elaborately carved wood stands (Markbreiter 2, p. 63). Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 34.25″ (87 cm) (including stand). 26.75″ x 22″ (67.9 x 55.9 cm) (visible areas of jade screens). 24.75″ x 21″ (62.9 x 53.3 cm) (jade oval plaque, not including buttress support). CONDITION: Polished surfaces. Very good. 9-94975, 9-94976, 9-94977, 9-94978 (30,000-50,000) – Lot 19

Have a similar item you want to sell?

20

GOD OF LONGEVITY.

19th-20th century, China. Nephrite: pale yellow-green with light brown markings. Known as “Shoulao” or “Shouxing” (The Star God of longevity), this popular image from Taoist lore is mentioned first in early Han chronicles, and the worship of Shouxing was sanctioned in the 8th century during the Tang Dynasty (Little, p. 41, #13). As with the figure of Bodhidarma, there have been many legends associated with the original figure, in this case Laozi, a probably mythical but possibly historical person who by the Sui Dynasty was being represented as a deity (Pontynen, p. 308). The seated or standing Shoulao is frequently the subject of later Chinese works of art, appearing in such diverse media as painting, textiles, ivories, ceramics, and hardstone. Most commonly he appears in the guise of a standing fully-robed, stoop-shouldered elderly, bearded gentleman of benevolent appearance with a large (peach-shaped) head and wrinkled forehead. Supported by a staff of gnarled wood, which may have a gourd hanging from the crook, he carries a large peach or a ruyi scepter in one hand. He may be accompanied by a small boy carrying another peach, bats flying about his head, a crane, or a spotted stag (Palm, p. 130, #134; TCJ, p. 352 top; Watt Seattle, p. 85, #62; Keverne, p. 166, #96). The peach, stag, crane, fungal-shaped ruyi scepter, and gourd all have longevity connotations. This frontally-disposed carving illustrates the standing fully-bearded old man, supported by his large gnarled, gourdbearing staff and carrying a large peach in his right hand. A small boy, tucked behind his right sleeve, carefully holds a peach with both hands. The elongated earlobes draped over the hunched shoulders and the disproportionate size of the head, together with the lack of a neck, are formulaic “holy image” features of many later Chinese works of art. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 17.75″ x 11″ x 5.25″. (45.1 x 27.9 x 13.3 cm.) CONDITION: Stone with contrasting fissures and seams throughout of rust brown color. Very good. 9-94916 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 20

Have a similar item you want to sell?

21

FLAT-BELLIED ARCHAISTIC HU.

20th century, China. Nephrite: streaked pale grayish green to yellowish green with added brown accents. The hu, brought to perfection in the late Zhou and early Han periods, has remained one of the most popular forms in later Chinese art, appearing in many different media including ceramic, cloisonne, bamboo, and hardstones. Its importance in famous collections of the 18th and 19th centuries is attested by its inclusion in catalogues of those collections (Beurdeley, p. 203, and p. 57, an early Zhou example). Later, “revival”, versions sport a variety of decor, some unrelated to bronze prototypes. Often the hu will appear as a pair, used for altar flowers or as important components of impressive ritual or garniture sets, but it also appears alone, and in miniature as well as grand-scale format. The hu illustrated here, which is essentially a handled variation of the hu, is quite different, illustrating the overall utility of this basically simple yet sophisticated shape. A hu begins with a firm round or ovoid foot, moving quickly into a low swelling belly, with a continuous curve through a narrowing waist and long extended shoulder-neck area. The lip often lacks strong definition, and there may or may not be a contemporary lid. Decor in the original bronzes and on bronze-influenced later versions is based on zones of motifs encircling the work, typically with zones of greater dimensions on the upper belly and shoulder areas, and duplicated motifs immediately above the foot and below the lip. There may be two handles on the original bronzes, attached to the neck (or shoulder neck) area. Often they are shaped like elephant heads from which the trunk curves back into the vessel. In some later Bronze Age examples, there are independently-moving suspended bronze circles captured within the grasp of the trunk, or placed partially within the mouth of an animal mask. This flat-bellied strongly-mottled archaistic hu is characteristic of certain revival versions of the classic model, with a much more angular profile and large heavy lid with a fully-developed crouching lion knob. There are also suspended handles of differing sizes attached to growling feline head forms, and a flat-sided belly with large-scale taotie mask form, with the usual pig snout and glaring eyes. This heavy (25.3 lb., 11.5 kg.) variation on the Zhou-Han models, with one large area on the belly reserved for an important design, is not untypical of some of the later revival hu forms in hardstone or even bronze. A later hardstone hu in the Metropolitan Museum, for example, also has a large-scale decor zone on the belly of the vessel, with designs of auspicious portent, and with elephant handles supporting suspended rings (Hai, p. 163, #163). The foot of the present work is a shaped rectangle, and indeed the vessel’s overall shape is neither ovoid or round, but a modified rectilinear form. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 16.5″ x 9″ x 3″. (41.9 x 22.9 x 7.6 cm.) CONDITION: Stone with small fissures. Very good. 9-95017 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 21

Have a similar item you want to sell?

22

MASSIVE CONVOLUTED MOUNTAIN.

Late 18th-19th century, China. Nephrite: Pale yellowish-green with minor darker areas and pale brown markings. A wonderfully-contorted and fissured jade mass, this fully carved off-center mountain has a number of high relief and free-standing images and objects scattered around the convoluted surface. The standard man-made elements such as villages, bridges, stone-laden paths and city walls are carefully detailed, right down to the stone blocks which make up the massive ramparts of the wall. Such realism in the midst of an otherwise fantastic setting may be found in Qing painting as well as elaborately carved jades, with city walls and villages often located at the top of the precipitous setting (Spink 81, #76; Columbus, pp. 18-9, #23, 23a, “Traveler in Snow-covered Mountains” by Zhang Gu, dated 1659). The figures, the focus of the work, are proportionally larger than the man-made elements, and are set discreetly into small groups isolated in smaller settings scattered about the entire mass. A series of internally connected grottoes is created by the convoluted surface, the natural fissures of which are enhanced by carefully carved passages emphasizing their depth and directional turns. The spotted stag and the pines convey a message of longevity, and the figures, some of whom happily strum instruments, are making full and pleasurable use of their multifaceted setting. With a wide base, a strongly diagonal vertical orientation, and naturally asymmetrical and folded surfaces enhanced by well-carved pictorial elements, this low-polished mountain is endlessly fascinating, and must be experienced in the full round to be appreciated. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. Auctioneers note: Jade mountains of this size are truly rare, indeed any object of jade this large is extremely hard to find. SIZE: 23.63″ x 20″ x 14.25″. (60 x 50.8 x 36.2.) CONDITION: Fissures throughout. Very good overall. 9-95066 (30,000-50,000) – Lot 22

Have a similar item you want to sell?

23

JADE BUDDHIST MONK WITH BEGGING BOWL.

19th-20th century, China. Nephrite: light grayish yellow-green (celadon). The elongated earlobes, monk’s robe, shaved head, gentle withdrawn attitude, and alms bowl all identify this image as a Buddhist monk. While the image is presented frontally, the robes flare out to one side, and the bowl, in counterbalance, is held tenderly out to the other side. A pendant-bedecked sash is suspended from the waist. The sparely-detailed large head, with its downcast eyes and tucked-in mouth, sits directly on the shoulders. Sandal-bound feet emerge slightly from the undergarment. The material is well-polished and the undercutting expertly manipulated, providing an impression of depth in the robe. Prototypes for such figures often wear small cloth caps or display slightly more body movement, though most achieve their effect through spatial manipulation of the drapery (SL 6/8/82, #316 and Palmer, Pl. 24; Poor, #78). This is a placid, effective and substantial (15 lb., 7 kg.) presentation of a well-known Buddhist image. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 12.75″ x 6.5″ x 4.25″. (32.4 x 16.5 x 10.8 cm.) CONDITION: Small shell crack on base rim. Otherwise good. 9-95071 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 23

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

24

WINE VESSEL WITH DRAGON DECOR.

18th century style, China. Nephrite: uniform medium greenish-yellow. A variation on a Song theme, this heavy “U”-shaped ewer or rhyton has three high relief chilong (immature dragons) climbing up and over the shaped mouth of this elegant shape; one, who has achieved the summit, serves also as handle. The vessel is otherwise undecorated, without any archaic bronze-style bands of design as are found on similar works from the Kangxi and Qianlong eras. (SHK 5/19/87, #337-38; Palm, p. 76, #69; Watt Seattle, p. 124. #107; Hai, p. 160, #160). The distinct small foot rim, drooping lip and softly curving top are typical of mid-Qing versions of this useful and decorative form, as are the soft dragon forms which cling closely to the surface (Hai, p. 157, #157. Asian Art Museum, San Francisco example). The material is slightly mottled and exhibits a high polish. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 7.13″ x 6.25″ x 4″. (18.1 x 15.9 x 10.2 cm.) CONDITION: Stone with small fissures. Very good. 9-95000 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 24

Have a similar item you want to sell?

25

BOULDER-SHAPED MOUNTAIN WITH TEMPLE AND BRIDGE.

20th century, China. Nephrite: very light greenish-gray with rich brown rind. Inscription: “[From] Hanshan Temple out of Gushu [now Shuzhou City, [in] the middle of the night the sound of the temple bell [spread] to the [ears of] the travelers on the boat”, a Tang poem, preceded by a gourd-shaped seal with a cyclical date of “Ren Wu“. Stained ruddy brown on portions of the low-polished exterior, this regularly-profiled pebble-form boulder has a deep opening on the front with two different levels of extremely well detailed settings and activities divided by an irregular cliff face. On the lower level a boat (partially visible) has brought a visitor to the base of a river, with a bridge stretching across it and a path extending to the left side, by means of which the traveler may make his way to the upper level. There, he will find a gated wall (executed in a complex perspective view) set around a several-story-high temple, with a pagoda visible at the very back of the concavity (Ip, p. 256, #238; Hai 2, p. 202, #200, similar works). On the reverse of this small boulder the gourd-shaped cyclical date and the two lines (of seven characters each) of the Tang poem, written in seal script, are engraved into the richly stained surface. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 6.13″ x 3.63″ x 2.63″. (15.6 x 9.2 x 6.7 cm.) CONDITION: Carved in deep relief. Very good. 9-95078 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 25

Have a similar item you want to sell?

26

ARCHAISTIC RHYTON.

Ming Dynasty or later, China. Nephrite: greyish-yellow green (celadon) with brown splotches and streaks. One of the most familiar shapes in Chinese hardstone history, the rhyton with animal mouth base and tail is an important component of the jade workshop repertoire from the Song period until today. The Chinese name for a bronze form roughly akin to this is guang (NPM, #23, a Song jade guang), but because there are so many versions of that form, and because of the non-Chinese origin of this particular version of a basic cup form, in English these works are generally labeled “libation cups” or “rhytons” (or, more properly, “rhyta”). Originating in the Hellenistic world and transmitted to China via the Sassanian empire trade from Persia, the earliest examples in Chinese art history are said to be the Tang Dynasty libation cups created in various media including gold, ceramic, onyx and agate (Gure, pl. 29, #102; Roberts, p. 44, #32; ROM, pp. 26-7, #11). The form is a deep horn-like cup “apparently engulfed by the open jaws of a powerfully fanged dragon” (Lion, p. 119). Because of the extended period of popularity of this form, there are numerous “period styles”, with variations in terms of proportions, size, surface motifs, and handle form. Even the creature’s facial appearance may differ markedly from one cup to the next. It is not uncommon for the gently swelling cup portion to have circular bronze-style decor bands over most of its surface, and for chilong (immature dragons) to be sculpted freely around the outside as well as the inside of the cup (Ip, pp. 240-42, #214; SNY 4/10/86, #263; CSHK 3/19/90, #886; TCJ, p. 339; Hai, p. 91, #91, an example in the Musee Guimet). The handle is often twisted and diagonally-oriented in relation to the cup (as here), and may develop into a floral scroll, rather than sustaining the animal mouth/ mask theme. Although the yellow jade Song pieces (Foster, p. 68, #97; ACGB, p. 88, #277) have proved difficult for later workshops to copy, due to the lack of similar material, the green/ brown Song works (D’Argence, p. 88) and grey/brown-toned Yuan-Ming jade materials (lp, pp. 240-41, #214) are imitated in many later archaizing cups. Some of the Qing works also take advantage of the beautiful white jade (Spink 81, #13) or spinach-green jade (SNY 4/10/86, #263) available during that period. Although the present jade has many Song features both in its proportions and decor types, the flatness of the base has led most observers to conclude that it must be dated to the Ming period, if not later. This is a very rewarding piece to handle, with a tactile surface and thin, somewhat translucent, walls. Although its appearance would seem to indicate that it is a weighty work, in fact it is relatively light. Its surface is loaded with refined carving of carefully arranged archaic designs such as key frets, blades and stipple marks. The base has a complex of spirals related to the animal shape holding the cup, and the contorted handle is striated overall. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 5.25″ x 5″ x 2.63″. (13.3 x 12.7 x 6.7 cm.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-94924 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 26

Have a similar item you want to sell?

27

ROUND BRUSH WASHER WITH DENSE DRAGON AND CLOUD DECOR.

18th-19th century, China. Jadeite: opaque white with small bright patches of emerald green and light violet. Brushwashers (xi) and large bowls intricately decorated with a dragon, and sea and cloud combination are known in hard stone examples dating as far back as the Yuan, when a particularly famous “black” (dark green) jade example was created (Keverne, p. 130, Fig. 5; Till, p. 43, two views). During the Ming there were many dragon-sea-cloud bowls or brush washers produced in jade for scholars’ studios and palace use (Watt 2, pp. 134-35, #111; Palmer, #21-2; Poor, #6). Because of the respect accorded scholar’s desk objects as well as the potent symbolism implied by this combination of decorative motifs, these bowls or brushwashers generally are of extremely fine quality. Often the dragons are shown as rising from a swirling watery base and rising into the clouds, a spring scene of great import for an agricultural economy, implying fertility and rain for crops in the fields. The dragons may number from two up to nine in number on any one bowl. The popular theme of a “flaming pearl” being chased by two dragons also appears on some brushwashers. During the Qing, the dragons may appear in high relief against an undecorated or simply decorated body with cloud patterns (as with #27; Beurdeley, p. 232: NPM, #41). Alternatively, dragons and clouds may unite to create a frenzied, roiling surface from which no individual form emerges in high relief. The overall configuration of the bowl or brush washer also varies widely, from a circular form with handles, as here, to a plain circular form, a gourd shape (as in Keverne, p. 148), a nonconforming bulbous shape, and other alternatives, as dictated by the shape of the material and desires of the patron or workshop. This classically simple circular bowl, with long-tongued ram-horned animal-mask handles supporting independently-turning rings at two sides, has a sunken undecorated base and undecorated interior. The sensitive low relief overall design of dragons and clouds froths over the entire surface, leading up to the circular mouth opening. The color patches of violet and green upon the cream vase further enliven the surface, and create an unexpectedly assymetrical gracenote to the otherwise formal and traditional piece. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 2.5″ x 9″ dia (7 x 22.9 cm dia) (mask to mask). CONDITION: Very good. 9-95015 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 27

Have a similar item you want to sell?

28

RECTANGULAR BI-COLORED BRUSH HOLDER WITH FIGURES IN LANDSCAPE.

20th century, China. Nephrite: Greyish yellow-green (celadon) with large areas of dark brown. Inscription: Thirteen-character seal script text reading : “To mount high to view the spectacle between sky and earth (i.e., in the world), the big river is wild and goes beyond return”, followed by a seal reading “Pine”. A handsome, boldly carved work, this flat-based brush holder makes clever use of its two widely differing tones to create a landscape scene of the type found on Qing jade and bamboo brushholders (Wang, p. 120, #64, for example). The indebtedness of these forms to the painting medium is undeniable. The deep brown craggy mountain foreground, through which a stream flows, gives way to a lighter-toned cloudy region, with a small hut and a distinguished figure walking down a path and over a bridge below a waterfall, followed by a smaller, stoop shouldered attendant; other figures approach around the side. The rapidly-flowing stream culminates in heavy waves at one side, while on the other, a man with an attendant observes two flying birds, and a deer enters the scene at the lower left. The clouds are lingzhi (magic fungus)-shaped, and no doubt there are longevity implications throughout the work. The poem on the reverse is an apt description of the scene on front and side. Though the rectangular form is not as common for brush holders as round or ovoid forms, there are other known examples such as the nine-dragon rectilinear brushholder of the 18th century in the National Palace Museum, Beijing (Keverne, p. 172, #112). This massive (15 lb., 7 kg.) brushholder from the Yangtze River Collection is a relatively recent production, though in the style of the 18th century, and illustrates the strength of tradition continuing into modern workshop productions. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 9.5″ x 7.13″ x 4.75″. (24.1 x 18.1 x 12.1 cm.) CONDITION: Very good with polished surfaces. 9-95018 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 28

Have a similar item you want to sell?

29

VERTICAL CLIFF FACE WITH LAYERS OF FIGURES AND ANIMALS.

Late 19th-20th century, China. Nephrite: homogeneous very light greenish-gray, on a modern fitted wood and metal instant stand. Almost rectilinear in shape, with scalloped borders suggesting mountain walls, this jade slab reflects certain elements of the other mountain boulder carvings but is less deeply cut and convulsed, and more regularly organized. Beginning from a rocky base upon which a peasant and buffalo are posed gazing upwards, as if amazed at the apparition above them, there are four levels of standing, beautifully garbed feminine images, arranged in sets of one or two per level. Some hold peaches or fans and other attributes of female immortals. Unconcerned with the dynamics of their rocky setting, they assume inactive and entirely frontal positions. The reverse is simply designed with cloud bands winding among the rugged mountain faces. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 17.88″ x 6″ x 1.25″. (45.4 x 15.2 x 3.2 cm.) CONDITION: Very good with well polished surfaces. 9-94923 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 29

Have a similar item you want to sell?

30

BULBOUS BRUSH WASHER WITH MULTIPLE DRAGON DECOR.

Late 18th-19th century, China. Jadeite: off-white with extensive green and lavender areas. Inscription: On the base, a difficult set of characters, which may read “Dragon-X Imperial Brush Washer”, the “X” possibly reading “Stream” or “Day”; on the interior, a “Shou” or “Longevity” character. This brush washer bulges in irregular fashion and has a petalate loti-form deeply undercut lip and a sculpted body with dragon, wave, and cloud decor executed in both high and low relief. The petalate loti-form foot rim has a compound inscription on the sunken base, set in an irregularly-shaped cartouche form, the interior in a more regular ovoid form. The body’s decoration s both lush and detailed, requiring extended study to decipher. It also has a highly tactile and well-polished surface. The elegance, the drama, and the baroque qualities of this imposing (8lb., 3.5 kg.) work are typical of mid-to late-Qing workshop carvings. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 5″ x 7.75″ x 6″. (12.7 x 19.7 x 15.2 cm.) CONDITION: Dense carving throughout. Very good. 9-94915 (5,000-7,000) – Lot 30

Have a similar item you want to sell?

31

LUOHANS IN CAVES.

20th century, China. Nephrite: Grayish yellow-green (celadon) with darker green and brown areas. Inscription: Biboyan: A huge stone like a mountain they are meeting at Biboyan. Over 4000 years have gone by just like that (like the snap of the finger) and the stars did not record spring and autumn as they passed. Learning about truth and calming your desires–whatever happens, do not worry! Nothing is important. The old Monk can see through the entire world. When there is nothing to do, I close my eyes for meditation. Sleepiness is gone, and I still have not fallen asleep. The sound (of the priests chanting) continues while the moon is already in the sky. The dragon, ghost, trees and flowers come to disturb, and there is also the ever troublesome fox (woman) with eyes so very seducing. I should not be a Buddhist Monk and come here listening to other people’s services. Sealed and signed: Monk Jukong. Horizontally-inclined, this mountain setting presents discrete grotto settings for the individual luohan who populate the front of the carving, while at the top, a cloud form drapes over the front and back, in a manner associated with a number of Qing mountains and brush holder carvings. The combination of “The luohan-in-Grotto theme and the swirling clouds are commonly found in (the late Ming-early Qing) period”, according to Ip (Ip, p. 262, #234), and comparable works from both early and mid-Qing are known (Spink IV, p. 123, #172). The association of luohan and caves is illustrated on a grand scale at several actual sites in China, in particular at the Eight Luohan Mountain near the Xi Ling, the Western graves of the Manchu Emperors (Smithies, p. 265); and the famous Fei-lan-feng, in the hills west of the city of Hangzhou and near the great Chan (Zen) Buddhist temple. Ling-yin-ssu, where a Maitreya Buddha rests blissfully in a niche amidst a semicircle of eighteen luohan figures, all individually conceived in terms of pose and appearance. The sculptures, in “living rock” are formed out of a series of natural limestone formations (Edwards). Luohan are associated especially with two schools of Chinese Buddhism, the Tiantai and the Chan. According to Whitfield, the “cult of Lohan” is primarily a post Tang phenomenon, and the usual open-air depiction for the main group of sixteen luohan accorded well with the standard settings accorded Daoist representations of sages and hermits (Whitfield). In the literature, luohan are all provided with individual histories or characteristics and may be identified by associated attributes. Although they are listed in a numerical order in the sets described in Buddhist texts, the exact order may not be followed in a particular art work. Thus, in the example from the 18th century illustrated in the Spink catalogue noted immediately above, the figures have been tentatively identified as the first, third, fifth, seventh, ninth, eleventh, thirteenth and fifteenth members of the set, accompanied by a boy worshipper-attendant. Sometimes the particular luohan is identified by inscription, or at other times, by associated attributes such as a particular animal companion or a physical quirk. It is not uncommon that a specific identification is lacking, and then these images and the standard Daoist recluse images are virtually inseparable. In this carving from the Yangtze River Collection, some of the eight members of the luohan population may be identified, as for example the top left image with the smoking round incense burner, and the long-eyebrowed individual casually posed to the lower right, while others are less distinctly particularized. They are relaxed, some in meditative pose, and all fit compactly into the irregular spaces provided across the carved-out surface. There is less suggestion about internal cavities than found on several other carvings, and the contortions of the boulder are less marked. The cloud formation which drapes the top of the rock continues over to the reverse, which is inscribed at length with a standard Buddhist essay. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 7.5″ x 17.75″ x 2.5″. (19.1 x 45.1 x 6.4 cm.) CONDITION: Carved in deep relief. Very good. 9-95094 (8,000-12,000) – Lot 31

Have a similar item you want to sell?

32

CUP-SHAPED BRUSH HOLDER WITH FIGURES IN LANDSCAPE.

Late 18th-19th century, China. Jadeite(?): Opaque bright green to greenish-yellow. Inscription: four-character Qianlong reign mark. Fully carved with one continuous landscape frieze, this brushholder illustrates riders on horseback journeying through a craggy riverine setting, while in the distance, a walled complex with a two-story entrance and two additional figures in a forest pavilion appear as the brushholder is turned. The pine tree trunks are given their texture through a continuous series of punchmark-style roundels. The inscribed base is sunken and the lip is unusually grooved. A raised cloud band encircles the brushholder below the lip, completing the effect of the high mountain setting indicated by the other elements of the landscape. The device of a cloud band encircling the top of a brushholder is well-known from mid-and later Qing jade (and bamboo) brush holders, such as published examples in the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco (Hai, p.l86, #186; Hai 2, p. 75, #73). Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 7.38″ x 7.38″ x 6.63″. (18.7 x 18.7 x 16.8 cm.) CONDITION: Stone well polished. Very good. 9-95012 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 32

Have a similar item you want to sell?

33

TWO ARCHAISTIC JADE RITUAL VESSELS.

Late 18th-19th century, China. Nephrite: Dark green with black, metallic specks and minor lighter green patches. A pair of shaped basins make up this handsome pair of dark-green thinly-carved highly-polished vessels in the Mughal style from the later Qing period. They are fully-decorated with low relief carving of taotie masks and floral designs over the external surfaces and with the independently-moving handles, so characteristic of the period, suspended from formal floral heads. Their formality and perfection of type are also characteristic of the extant larger altar garnitures produced in several mid-late Qing workshops, either in the archaistic style reflecting the classical past or in the popular contemporary Mughal style (Palmer, #25; Na, pp. 152, 154, #205; Watt 2, p. 170, #144; Foster, p. 62, #121; Keverne, p. 151, #56; and CNY 11/29/90, #334). Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: Shaped dish: 2.25″ x 9.13″ x 5.5″. (5.7 x 23.2 x 14 cm.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-95019, 9-95020 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 33

Have a similar item you want to sell?

34

LI BO WITH HIS JAR OF WINE.

19th-20th century, China. Jadeite(?): very light bluish-gray, on fitted wood stand. During the late Ming and Qing periods, many works of art were inspired by classic or contemporary literary themes, and certain of the authors (particularly those with interesting biographies) were themselves portrayed in diverse media. Among this select number was the Tang Dynasty poet Li Bo, whose poetic prowess and drinking aptitude inspired images of the type illustrated here, a scholar posed at his ease in a rockery with his crackle-glaze ceramic wine jar near at hand (Watt 2, p. 25; Myrtle, p. 119, #1). According to Ip Yee, this pose is common in Kangxi era works of art (lp, p. 192), and it has been used for other popular figures as well, including one of the Daoist Immortals (Fourcade, pp. 170-71, pl. 33). In some portrayals of Li Bo, the wine jar is in the shape of a peach, reflecting the longevity-Daoist imagery associated with the poet (Beurdeley, p. 248, a ceramic work) and in others, the poet is portrayed as very drunk, supporting his slumbering head on one hand (Spink, #142, a soapstone sculpture) or on a stack of books (lp, pp. 192-93, #176; CKYCTC, p. 186, a red and white agate carving). Treated with great respect by the jade carver, this portrayal of the mature Li Bo shows him with one arm securing the jar, the other outstretched on his reclining figure, at ease on his rocky platform. He is dressed fully in an elaborately belted scholar’s robe with underskirt, and his feet are tucked into felt shoes which are fully visible. His handsome face sports neatly trimmed mustache and goatee, and his hair is tied in a neat knot at the top of his head. The clean pale green material has been given a high polish. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 4.5″ x 11.5″ x 4″. (11.4 x 29.2 x 10.2 cm.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-95006 (10,000-12,000) – Lot 34

Have a similar item you want to sell?

35

ARCHAISTIC YOU.

18th century style, China. Jadeite(?): pale green in patchy patterns with brown at base. The utility of the hu shape is apparent in this work. The overall shape of a hu, with its ovoid base, swelling belly, more slender shoulder and neck and unnoticeable lip, influences this form, to which, however, there has been attached a massive swinging handle. The overall configuration thus created appears in the classical bronze repertoire, where it is known as a you (Lawton, pp. 64-6, examples of you from the Qianlong Emperor’s collection), although at times smaller versions with a chain-like handle from which the vase or bottle can be suspended will be designated as hu (Wang, p. 104, #42; Gyllensvard, p. 27. #9: and see discussion of a “handled hu“in Bagley, p. 127, #21). In this Yangtze River Collection example, there is a minute pierced suspension knob at the top of the handle. The deer head terminations on the handle are clearly marked as are the independent animal heads on front and back, and there is a low relief encircling motif on a distinct belly zone, with another design on the thick handle, around the lip of the vessel, and on the well-hollowed and fitted lid. Unlike the other hu vases in this collection this vessel has a strongly marked profile curve, but is within the ovoid-hi tradition, as described by Bagley: “The classic you of Anyang and later times has a pointed oval cross section and is arranged so that the frieze unit spans the full arc of 180 degrees from one end of the oval to another” (Bagley, p. 107, discussing a mid-2nd millennium b.c. you). The handle, which is functional, swings slightly to either side of the body of the work, and although of larger scale than ideal proportioning would permit, is within boundaries of the classical ancestry of this form and its variations, and also is a regular feature of later versions of such you (Palmer, #27 and ACGB, p. 128, #147, the well-known de Menasce Collection example from the 18th century). The material is neither strongly mottled nor uniformly light-toned, as was the case in the other works; it is of medium green hue, with some brown inclusions and with an overall snowflake effect. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 8.75″ x 5.5″ x 2.25″. (22.2 x 14 x 5.7 cm.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-94998 (12,000-15,000) – Lot 35

Have a similar item you want to sell?

36

RECUMBENT HORSE.

19th-20th century, China. Nephrite: Grayish yellow-green (celadon) with white areas and traces of brown markings. This large (59 lb.) Yangtze River Collection Qing-date horse has well-modeled mane and tail, with added color emphasizing the strands. Both the neck musculature and pose are believable, as is the modeling of the four legs tucked under the body. The marked spinal ridge is off center in the pose assumed by the beast, with the fat belly protruding on the opposite side, and the head turns back over the belly area rather than directly down the middle. The face appears both friendly and alert. The brown irregular streaks of the material cross over the sturdy body in interesting fashion, lending an abstract note to the otherwise physically realistic depiction. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 11″ x 17-5″ x 5.75″. (27.9 x 44.5 x 14.6 cm.) CONDITION: Natural fissures and inclusions throughout. 9-94920 (15,000-20,000) – Lot 36

Have a similar item you want to sell?

37

MOUNTAIN WITH FIGURES BENEATH OVERHANG.

Mid 18th-19th century, China. Nephrite: grayish yellow-green (celadon) with bands of opaque brown. Shaped with a relatively regular, ovoid profile, this small but substantial (17lb., 7.5 kg.) mountain has a frontal focus. In effect, the carving resembles a close-up view of one of a scene allowing the viewer to concentrate on a single center of activity. Three elders and their attendants are engaged in what appears to be a scene releasing (or attempting to capture?) a long legged bird which is in flight at the upper left (See also Keverne, p. 171, #108). A slatted box with lid held by one small boy is carefully detailed to the lower left of the clearing in which the scene takes place. The branches of the pine trees flanking the scene and emerging from the cliff are irregularly pierced to heighten the realism of this self-contained work. On the reverse, broad steps lead up a precipitous cliff face fashioned from forbidding angular rock slabs. A heavy overhang towers above the center of activity, in the style of mid-Qing painting and woodblock prints such as those in travel books introducing pilgrims to important sites (Zwalf, p. 232, #239, a page from an 18th century guide to “Putuo shan”). The style is associated with several jade-carving schools of the Qing, including those of Suchou (Watt 2, p. 122, #104). Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 12.38″ x 7.5″ x 3.25″. (31.4 x 19.1 x 8.3 cm.) CONDITION: Very good with natural fissures and occlusions. 9-95067 (10,000-15,000) – Lot 37

Have a similar item you want to sell?

38

DRAGON AND WAVES.

19th century-Early Modern Period, China. One of the first animals to be represented in Chinese art, the dragon is a potent and sensuous form much beloved of artists and philosophers. The manners in which it manifests itself are as numerous as the symbolic messages it bears. King of the animal world, mate to the phoenix, guardian of the east, the dragon rises from its watery palaces in the spring, ascending into the heavens from which it will proffer rain to newly-planted fields (Zhao 2, p. 236). Connotations of fertility are strongly associated with the imaginary creature, whose body is composed of parts borrowed from real animals. Unlike other animals, its body is allowed to change with the passage of years, and there are youthful, mature, and old forms: all of which are popular in art. In early East Asian tomb paintings, dragons occupy the east side of the tomb, with the phoenix on the south, tiger on the west, and the turtle/snake duo on the north. In other early works of art, including jade carvings, the dragon may appear as a compound dragon-horse (Palmer, #34, a late 17th century jade) or dragon-fish (Wan Seattle, p. 66, #41, a 13th-14th century jade plaque), or it might be paired with a phoenix (male-female, emperor-empress), or tiger (rain and wind, east and west). These images are maintained over the centuries and joined by other popular combinations such as the dragon in association with clouds or waves (rain, fertility), another dragon (chasing the elusive “flaming pearl”), or an entire kingdom composed of dragons of differing “official” rank. Dragons may function as gods in their own right or serve as vehicles for other gods and lesser Buddhist, Daoist and folk deities (Rosenzweig, p. 163, 165-70; Zhao, pp. 72-86; Zhao 2, pp. 237-40). In summary, dragons have cosmological, ritual, and agricultural implications, many of which are explored in jade carvings over the centuries. Dragons are not only symbolically charged, they are also useful and compliant beasts for artistic purposes, since they can be draped and twisted around, up, or down objects so easily. In later years. and in both China and Japan, they are often contorted into a writhing circle to provide a support for crystal balls set on their bodies or in their mouths. Dragons as functional stands for such balls are not unique to jade; they appear in the metal arts and cloisonne as well, and are treated with the greatest respect by workmen fashioning this shape (Moss, p. 285, #141, and Moss 2, p. 18, gilt bronze versions). This horned and bushy-tailed dragon, riding on agitated waves, spews a foaming cloud from his mouth; nearby the flaming pearl bobs on a small rush of water. His eyes bulge and glare, his legs are tensed and prepared to move, and the entire work is well-detailed through repeated application of incised and low-relief patterns (as in Watt Seattle, p. 98, #77, a similar fully-detailed dragon, of the Qianlong period). Departing from the norm, this dragon is not bearded, nor is it leonine-maned (Munsterberg, p. 42, #38) or winged. Flames do not radiate from its joints, nor is its head particularly massive and imposing, as is so often the case in the Ming (Keverne, p. 137, #21; Watt Seattle, p. 78, #51). The creature is executed in full round, with incised waves on the otherwise flat base. The material is adventurously worked, with enormous openings through the coiled body leading to two interior cavities, and the overall polish is admirable. As D’Argence has written, the “perpetual posture of combat” as illustrated here, as well as the two-pronged antlers, enormous mouth, and firmly-planted paws are characteristic of mid- Qing dragons (D’Argence, p. 158, pl. LXXII). The “Li” dragon, or dragon of the sea, the subject of this Yangtze River collection sculpture is among the more popular forms taken by this essential creature in Qing art. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 6″ x 10.5″ x 6.63″. (15.2 x 26.7 x 16.8 cm.) CONDITION: Well carved and polished. Very good. 9-94922 (15,000-20,000) – Lot 38

Have a similar item you want to sell?

39

GOURD-SHAPED BI-TONED BRUSH WASHER WITH DRAGON AND CLOUD DECOR.

19th century, China. Jadeite: opaque white to pale yellow-gray with areas of dark green. Designed with a magnificently-colored double-gourd form, a well shaped mouth opening in conforming gourd shape with undecorated interior, a large deep-bellied body fully decorated in uniform low relief, and a plain flat base, this brushwasher is an example of the better workshop products of the late Qing period. The dragons, spewing water from their mouths, are almost indistinguishable from the clouds, and the color patches are unrelated to the subject. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 4.75″ x 9.5″ x 5.75″. (12.1 x 24.1 x 14.6 cm.) CONDITION: Fissures visible in interior. Very good. 9-95013 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 39

Have a similar item you want to sell?

40

PENTAGONAL PLAIN BRUSH WASHER.

19th-20th century, China. Nephrite: pale greenish-yellow with deep brown patches. Inscription: Apocryphal two-character Qianlong mark in seal script form on reverse. Hefty, simple, with a large opening, undercut lip, and shallow basin, this work is reminiscent, in its straightforward simplicity, of some later Ming jade carvings. Its nearest stylistic link, however, is to Qing agate works, a similarity enhanced by the variegated brown splotches occurring at irregular intervals around the surface. Them carving is unrefined, with a low overall polish. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 1.25″ x 6″ x 4.25″. (3.2 x 15.2 x 10.8 cm.) CONDITION: Variegated stone with fissures, nicely polished. 9-95023 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 40

Have a similar item you want to sell?

41

TWO ARCHAISTIC RITUAL VESSELS.

Late 18th-19th century, China. Nephrite: Dark green with black, metallic specks and minor lighter green patches. A pair of zun make up this handsome pair of dark-green thinly-carved highly-polished vessels in the Mughal style from the later Qing period. They are fully-decorated with low relief carving of taotie masks and floral designs over the external surfaces and with the independently-moving handles, so characteristic of the period, suspended from formal floral heads. Their formality and perfection of type are also characteristic of the extant larger altar garnitures produced in several mid-late Qing workshops, either in the archaistic style reflecting the classical past or in the popular contemporary Mughal style (Palmer, #25; Na, pp. 152, 154, #205; Watt 2, p. 170, #144; Foster, p. 62, #121; Keverne, p. 151, #56; and CNY 11/29/90, #334). Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: Zun: 6.375″ x 4″ x 1.5″. (16.2 x 10.2 x 3.8 cm.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-95021, 9-95022 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 41

Have a similar item you want to sell?

42

PAIR OF UNDECORATED SMALL BOWLS.

18th century, China. Nephrite: Uniform pale yellowish-green. Inscription: A six-character Qianlong Reign mark in seal-script form on the base, in three lines of two characters each. Smaller in dimension, and with a slightly more bulbous profile, these undecorated bowls have a similar sturdy and neat foot rim, everted lip, and low polish. They are of the type found from the late Qianlong period up through the early years of the 20th century. The elegance of the profile and quality of material mark these as Qing, and if not of the Qianlong period itself (as indicated by the carefully executed inscription), surely they were produced shortly thereafter. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 2.25″ x 4″. (5.7 x 10.2 cm.) CONDITION: One bowl with tight vertical hairline. Otherwise good. 9-94996 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 42

Have a similar item you want to sell?

43

PEACH SHAPED SEAL INK BOX WITH HINGED LID.

Ming Dynasty style, possibly mid-late Qing Dynasty, China. Nephrite: white with yellowish overtones and gray patches with brown markings. An extremely refined, well-polished work, this appealing carving features leaves, blossom, and tendrils intricately disposed over the surface of the peach-shaped box. The presentation is realistic, the natural forms being executed in an admirable variety of relief carving levels with extremely fine cross-hatching for the heart of the flower. The effectively-employed color patches lend a further touch of realism. The two halves of the box are connected by a device of interlaced stems and circle, both halves and the circular connection being carved from the same piece of jade. There are Ming precedents for this type of peach-shaped box (ACGB, p. 109, #358; Keverne, p. 143, #37), which continues to appear in the Qing (Keverne, p. 152, #61-2), but at no time is it common. Both halves are well-hollowed, and the box can function as a seal ink container, although there is no evidence that this example was ever so used. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 2″ x 5″ x 3.5″ (5.1 x 12.7 x 8.9 cm) (closed). 9.8″ w (25.1 cm) (when opened and fully extended). CONDITION: Very good. 9-95005 (8,000-12,000) – Lot 43

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

44

HU WITH LOW RELIEF DECOR.

19th century, China. Nephrite: uniform, light greenish-yellow. This small hu exhibits greater respect for classical prototypes, with a softly-curving pear-shaped profile in the manner of the Eastern Zhou-early Han. Undramatic, vaguely dragon-like small-scale lugs or handles emerge at the neck zone, and the entire work is supported on a nicely-balanced discrete foot. The lip is gently shaped, matching the base of the work, and the incised and low-relief bands of traditional motifs are arranged horizontally about the work, with blade patterns at the foot and neck areas. There is no single striking design feature emerging from the work and the profile and the uniformly-colored material are much quieter. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 6.13″ x 2.25″ x 1.63″. (15.6 x 5.7 x 4.1 cm.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-95007 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 44

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

45

LIDDED BOX WITH GILDING.

18th century style, China. Serpentine: medium greenish-yellow with lighter streaks and worn gilding. Inscription: a four-character inscription, “Specially made by command of the Qianlong Emperor”, incised on the base. Of simple shape, this translucent mottled yellow/ green hard stone box has shaped corners, and a flat lid, interior and base, with four low shaped foot pads. The rims of the lid and base have been carefully carved to fit together securely. On the lid, sides and base there are gilded double-dragon and floral designs painted on the surfaces. Because of some loss of gilding, the designs today are somewhat indistinct. There is an academic dispute regarding the Qianlong’s Emperor’s attitude toward gilded hardstones, some experts declaring that he disliked such decorated ware; nevertheless, many carvings assigned with relative security to the late Qianlong period have gilded decor and reign marks (Watt Seattle, p. 96, #75), and the carving and decoration of this box are of the caliber associated with that period. Interestingly, Hung Li, the Qianlong Emperor, “… was the first of the Ch’ing [Qing] emperors to advocate the emulation of ancient jades and the inscription of faked marks” (Yang, p. 87), so that induced confusion over the veracity of reign marks is almost by imperial caveat, of long standing. Though the exact dating of this thin-walled is arguable, the fine quality is indisputable. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 1.13″ x 5″ x 3″. (2.9 x 12.7 x 7.6 cm.) CONDITION: Wear to gilding and enamel paint. Structurally very good. 9-95081 (2,000-2,500) – Lot 45

Have a similar item you want to sell?

46

ELEPHANT HOLDING MAGIC FUNGUS.

18th-19th century, China. Jadeite(?): Grayish yellow-green with brown patches and added color. With legs, trunk and tusks released from the well-shaped and polished body, this elephant is technically and aesthetically advanced over the previous example, although it possesses less of the dumpy charm of that work. As with the previous model, the eye is indicated by incised “sunrise rays” and the skin folds by deeper incisions which are filled with brown color, but the body is proportionally more realistic, the head less elevated, the ear folds (shaped yet again like closed lotus leaves) more elegantly modeled. The tusks, issuing from a realistically raised area on the head, emerge on either side of the well-defined trunk, which in turn curls to hold a magic fungus or ruyi scroll carved in relief and openwork. The legs are both functional and anatomically believable, with the toenails distinctly cut and cleverly curled under. The tail also is convincing. Overall, this is a relatively straightforward and graceful portrayal of the favorite animal in its symbolic role as signifier of longevity Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 5.75″ x 8.25″ x 2.75″. (14.6 x 21 x 7 cm.) CONDITION: Variegated stone carved in low relief. Very good. 9-94918 (1,500-2,000) – Lot 46

Have a similar item you want to sell?

47

DIGNITARY WEARING OFFICIAL BELT.

Late 18th-early 20th century, China. Jadeite: opaque pale greenish-grey with darker streaks. Sculpted images of seated dignitaries of mature years usually are extremely formal. Their presentation is entirely frontal, the figures seated stiffly within the confines of a high-backed chair. Their bodies appear bulky, in part due to the elaborate robes with which they are draped. Often there is a noticeable stomach paunch, emphasized by the bend of the figures at that area but also reflecting one common characteristic of middle age, the well-fed belly. The large belt of office which appears to float over their mid-section further emphasizes this rotundity. Although hands and shoe tips may emerge from beneath the robe, the body is otherwise concealed by the stiff garment folds. The carver gives no hint of musculature, nor is there any movement expressed, apart from an occasional bent leg associated with military heroes. Respected individuals from both secular and religious lore, representing both males and females, may be portrayed in the fashion described. Wood folk sculptures of this type are well-known (Link, p. 101, #33), but many are unidentifiable due to the wearing away of specific attributes. Certain highly refined carvings may present generic “dignitaries” (Roberts, p. 35, #24, a Ming “sage”; Hai 2, p. 189, #187, a standing jade dignitary). There are many recognizable icons of popular religion and historical legend, however, such as Guan Di and Wen Chang, identifiable due to associated attributes or appended labels (Frankel, p. 247, “Cheng Wu, God of the North”). Although this jade sculpture in the Yangtze River Collection presents no clues to aid in image identification, the pose is associated with sculptures known to represent Wen Chang, the patron god of literature and one of two popular gods who “symbolized the path to social acceptances and material rewards” (Sheaf, p. 134). Carved with a “strict simplicity”, in the same manner as a “Mandarin deity” assigned to the Yuan period by Schedel (Schedel, pp. 50-1, pl. 10), this sculpture is seated, the right hand emerging from the full sleeve folds (indicated by incisions) to rest on the lap, the left hand grasping the belt in traditional fashion, the legs akimbo and resting on the fitted wood stand. The stand itself has a shou, or “longevity” character and two animal head legs, and on the reverse, three circles which echo the circles on the body. The enormous and strangely flat head appears to be incomplete, needing headgear which would be attached separately, an observation confirmed by the fact that the top is the only unpolished area of the work. The features are not clearly defined; eye and mouth openings are indicated simply by slits across raised, puffy areas. There are further anomalies which make this a puzzling image, including the four incised circles, two each on front and reverse, which appear as though they might be plugs (in fact, X-ray analysis reveals that there are no internal cavities). One of the circles (on the back of the skirt) is incomplete, one is indicated by a single line (the torso), and the others have a double-line profile. Though this appears to be a primitive work from an early period, the material indicates that it is a later piece, perhaps executed as a test piece in a jade carving workshop, as suggested by one knowledgeable observer familiar with workshop practices. There appear to be no “comparables” of known date and workshop location which can answer the various questions raised by this piece. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 9.25″ x 4″ x 3.25″ (23.5 x 10.2 x 8.3 cm) (exclusive of stand). CONDITION: Stone with natural fissures. Good overall. 9-95076 (800-1,200) – Lot 47

Have a similar item you want to sell?

48

MOUNTAIN GROTTO WITH THREE LEVELS OF FIGURES.

20th century, China. Nephrite: light greenish-gray with deeply weathered brown rind. A pebble-form boulder with an off-center orientation, this work is deeply carved, with a path above the lapping waves at the base leading attendants with offerings past the cliff face and (it is implied) into the internal cave regions which are revealed on two upper levels. On the middle level, a seated gentleman contentedly plays a sheng, and on the upper level, two elders stand in front of a hut and glance down over the scenes below. The cave areas are deep and as they retreat into the boulder, the color darkens as it would naturally in such retreats. Stretching across the surface are cliff faces and pine branches, connecting one side of the scene with another, and it appears as though a cloth “skin” had been tightly wrapped around the work. The technical facility with which the tension of the linking elements and outer “skin” has been achieved is astonishing, and reflects the new technology available to modern workshops. A cave is “…an entrance to the transcendental world” in Chinese thought (Munakata, p. 148) and as such is prominently featured in both Buddhist and Daoist art. The mysterious passages, with the end hidden from the viewer’s eye, lead to the paradise of the Immortals. The reverse of this boulder portrays a water flow emerging at the base and a steep path rising up to a temple level beyond which there are a series of openings to the dongtian. The pine, the rocks, the water, and the caves and grottoes convey messages of virtue and longevity, and the “exaggerated realism” (Lytle, pp. 36-7) with which they are expressed here is both typical of very late jade works (Ip, p. 268, #240) and of the Qing paintings which served as their model (Munakata, p. 101). Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 7.88″ x 5.25″ x 2.25″ (20 x 13.3 x 5.7 cm.) CONDITION: Deeply carved example with light natural pitting. Very good. 9-95077 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 48

Have a similar item you want to sell?

49

SEAL IN TRUNCATED SHAPE.

19th century, China. Nephrite: Medium yellow-green stained and checkered with red-brown, with added silk suspension cords and red ink on calligraphy side. Inscription: Six-character seal-script inscription, reading: “Treasure of the Jiaqing Emperor.” possibly Apocryphal. Many Qing imperial seals are square and massive, their application to a painting, calligraphy, or document giving that work the official imprimatur. Many Qing imperial seals are square and massive, their application to a painting, calligraphy, or document giving that work the official imprimatur. As Thorp has written with regard to early Chinese imperial seals, “No imperial document was completely or fully sanctioned without the imprint of the imperial seal, the final and literal stamp of authority” (Thorp, p. 74, #22). Although there are but a few known extant pre-Qing imperial seals, many Qing period seals used for such purposes of sanction may be found in both museum and private collections. Large-scale seals of the Jiaqing Emperior (reigned 1796-1820) appear on many later paintings and calligraphies in the palace collections, but the strokes of these seals are usually narrower and less stiff than those on this seal, leading some observers to believe that it may be a later work in the style of the official Jiaqing seals. Most Qing imperial seals have a dragon or double-dragon knob set on top of a square base (Lytle, p. 110; TCJ, p. 321; Lowe, p. 7). The truncated (sloping sided) form here is unusual, although known in smaller versions (Li, #70d, with discussion of how to appraise seals 51 on pp. 182-83; Beurdeley, p. 204; Spink 2, #155). The seal has a high polish on the top and lower sides, with a low polish on the angled surfaces. Its mottled color and stained veins give the otherwise simply shaped and very heavy (11 lb.) work surface interest. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 4″ x 5.5″ square. (10.2 x 14 cm square.) CONDITION: Seal with veins throughout. Very good. 9-95479 (2,000-4,000) – Lot 49

Have a similar item you want to sell?

50

THREE JADE-HANDLED BRUSHES.

20th century, China. Nephrite: dense forest green. Cap: bright green malachite. Among the most prized possessions of a Chinese scholar are his brushes. Brushes formerly in the possession of famed literati or belonging to one’s esteemed ancestors are particularly cherished by gentlemen. Brushes also were given to a scholar upon a particular auspicious occasion in his life-a sixtieth birthday, perhaps, or a promotion to higher administrative post. Depending on the circumstances of his occupation, a scholar might need a wide repertoire of brush types, with differing hair types and configurations, handle materials, and sizes. These three heavy brushes, with their relatively wide handles and particular types of animal hair assemblage, would have been intended for larger-scale writing or painting, and because of its precious material, was probably made for presentation. The longest one, which is uninscribed, has an incised to low-relief design of a dragon and phoenix flying in clouds above waves with rocks; the brush of middle length has a single incised dragon; while the shortest brush, which has a cupped termination, has no design apart from the double inscription. Auspicious calligraphic inscriptions and symbolic decor are typically paired on later jade brushes. (Foster, p. 66, #136; Ip, pp. 286-87, #267-9;SPBNY 2/28/80, #228). Some brushes have a knob or attached cord at the top from which the brushes can be suspended in a rack, but these examples have identical, bright green malachite caps instead. The hairs of the brushes have been prepared for use (its glue binders dissolved), although it would appear that none has actually not been used. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: Hardstone materials only, not including hairs. Longest brush: 14.75″ (37.5 cm). Middle brush: 13″ (33 cm). Shortest brush with capped holder 12.38″ (31.4 cm). CONDITION: Very good. 9-94926, 9-94927, 9-94928 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 50

Have a similar item you want to sell?

51

BI-COLORED ELEPHANT.

20th century, China. Nephrite: grayish yellow-green (celadon) with rich brown areas and lighter-colored veins. Technically more advanced than other elephant works in this collection in terms of its surface polish, this large (19 lb.) elephant has open-lotus leaf ears, a well-modeled eye area, and a bushy tail which clings in low relief to the hindquarters (found on some Ming examples as well; TCJ, p. 153). Its fully-released trunk curls around with a magic fungus-form termination, and the four short, stubby legs convincingly support the heavy body, whose belly barely clears the ground. Detailing of the skin folds is kept to a minimum. Though competently shaped and finished with a high polish, this elephant lacks the interesting symbolic connotations and to a degree it also lacks sincerity of other elephants in this collection. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 7.75″ x 8.38″ x 3.38″. (19.7 x 21.3 x 8.6 cm.) CONDITION: Very good with fissures and inclusions. 9-94919 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 51

Have a similar item you want to sell?

52

MASSIVE PAIR OF CAPARISONED LIONS ON PEDESTALS.

19th-early 20th century, China. Nephrite or jadeite: light yellow-green of uneven, patchy character with black metallic specks. Associated with the quality of strength, and emblem of the clan to which the Historical Buddha belonged, lions became a popular subject of sculpture in the post-Han period when Buddhism was spreading throughout China. Since, as Thompson has written, “lions are a species known historically to the Chinese only by hearsay or perhaps through an occasional example presented to the Imperial zoo as tribute from foreign lands” (Thompson, p. 29), Chinese artists based their visual concept of “lion” on Indian art examples as well as descriptions of the creatures’ attributed character, arriving at a physical form which has proven satisfactory for successive centuries of artists and public. A single lion serves as the vehicle of the Buddhist figure Wen Shu (CTAP, p. 12), but traditionally lions in east Asian art appear in pairs, set to either side of entrances into important buildings of both religious and secular nature, and in front of throne or altar complexes, a practice possibly dated as early as the second century a.d. (Thompson, p. 30). One of the pair, the male, holds a ball beneath his right front paw, and the other, the female, plays with a cub beneath her left front paw. There are implications of fertility and hope for advancement in official position implicit in the pair and their associated attributes (Thompson, pp. 41-2). Ideally the male should be larger than the female to properly convey the symbolic message, but often they are of similar size, forming a symmetrical pair. Raised on shaped, cloth-draped, and pearl-banded plinths, these massive (each 176 lbs., 90 kg.) lions from the Yangtze River Collection assume the usual stances. The male puts his right forepaw on a ball, the female her left paw on the belly of a small lion cub. Based on prototypes associated with early Chinese Buddhist art and spirit paths, the creatures are seated on their haunches and are fierce in appearance, with snarling faces, tensed paws and strong, aggressively-thrusting chests. As with Six Dynasties, Sui, and Tang examples, the musculature of the beasts is exaggerated and the beasts are ready to attack evil doers who wish to pass by them (Colnaghi, p. 377, a ceramic lion of the 6th century; Barling 2, p. 9, a ceramic Wei period lion; Oster, a jade Six Dynasties example; Mayuyama, p. 22, a Sui stone lion; AAA, p. 59, fig. 5, a painted ceramic. Tang lion; and Ellsworth, p. 232, a marble Tang example). The powerful pose and intense mood of this pair are countered by the decorative touch of beautifully-arranged eyebrows, beards, and manes, the hairs of which are layered into careful rows of curling tufts, and also by the tasseled necklace with a large bell suspended at the front. As is usual with Chinese animal sculptures which recur over the centuries, later lion pairs become more fanciful, bedecked with decorative attributes and the two associations of ball and cub (Sparks, p. 369, a late Ming stoneware pair; Munsterberg 2, p. 105, a gilt bronze 15th century example; ROM, a Ming jade). The draped plinth, as illustrated here, is a form associated with many later lion pairs executed in ceramic, cloisonne, and metals as well as hard stone materials (Butterfield, #800, a 19th century cloisonne pair). Often the lions of later periods are less convincing as guardians, becoming subverted into playful, Pekinese-like creatures (Mitchell, #22, 23, 53), the “Fu”-dogs of bookends designed for tourists. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 25.5″ x 9.75″ x 13.25″. (64.8 x 24.8 x 33.7 cm.) CONDITION: Very good with light pitting. 9-95539 (500-700) – Lot 52

Have a similar item you want to sell?

53

SQUATTING ELEPHANT.

Mid-late Qing Dynasty, China. Jadeite(?): Greenish yellow-green with brown markings and added color in incisions. Elephants, considered one of the Seven Treasures of Buddhism, appear frequently in Chinese Buddhist art, and four-tusked versions are the vehicle of the popular Samantabhadra, one of the favorite disciples of Buddha (SNY 6/3/92, #227, an uncommon single-tusked blanc-de-chine version). The beasts are also considered “the symbol of strength, sagacity and power” (D’Argence, p. 100, pl. XLIII), and are associated with the virtues of longevity and prudence. Through a homonymic connection, Tai Ping Youxiang, an elephant bearing a vase is thought to be “… symbolic of universal peace” (Thorp, p. 94). Another homophone, Ji Xiang Ruyi, links an elephant and ruyi fungus with the concept of “safety, wealth and satisfaction” (CTAP p. 129). Examples dated to the late Tang, Song, and Yuan periods are known in the literature (ACGB, p. 72, #205; Green, p. 34; Gure, pl. 23, #3: CNY 5/30/90, #165; Watt 2, p. 75, #56) and Paludan writes that “The Song were probably the first dynasty to see elephants regularly on their spirit roads” At the Gengzian tombs of the Northern Sung, the elephants were attended by Indians (Paludan, p. 380). During the Ming and Qing, elephants were among the most frequently depicted creatures in the decorative arts, including cloisonne (Thorp, #31-2), metal (Sparks 2, p. 137: J.M.M., p. 332, pl. 6; Scrutator, p. 231 and ceramic, notably the famed Buddhist glazed tiles from Bao’en Temple in Nanjing (Thorp, #51) and export ware famille rose and blanc-de-chine models (OFA, p. 4; SNY 6/3/92, #227 and also #96, a Ming marble blanketed pair). Within the repertoire of animal shapes of Ming and Qing jade workshops, elephants are prominent motifs. Often they are depicted as elaborately caparisoned, with a detailed blanket, tassels and jewels, and perhaps a rider seated on its back in an elegant throne-like chair or a flower-bearing vase carried on its back (Paludan, p. 377; Keverne, title page; Watt Seattle, p. 101, #82; Watt 2, p. 75, #57). Children in groups of two, three or more may swarm around the friendly beast, and if there is a child carrying a vase, a rebus translated as “Peace in the land” (Tai Ping Jingzen) is inherent in the complex form (Ip, p. 182, #166). There may be lotus leafs and flowers, or ruyi vegetative scrolls held in the mouth and trunk of the elephant; indeed, as in this sculpture, elephant ears often appear loti-form. One of the major problems faced by jade workshops over the centuries has been how to free the legs, trunk, and tusks from the body, allowing the legs to function as supports for the heavy body as they do in real life. The overall form of the elephant is given by the standard boulder or pebble shape of the raw material, and early examples respect, and cling to, the contours of that material. The creature is posed in recumbent position, legs and trunk tucked in and under the body and tusks contained within the general frame. If the animal must appear to stand, the artists simply indicated the presence of legs through incisions or slight modelling, without releasing them from the material (CSHK, #881; Spink 81, #82; Ip, p. 166, #153; Schedel, pp. 56-7 #13; Watt 2, p. 75, #56; Hai, p. 118. #118). A common Ming solution was to provide a cloud-form support upon which the short stubby legs could stand, furnishing a base for the sculpture: Morgan suggests that perhaps as jade supplies dwindled in the Ming. “… the idea of giving strength to a standing animal by some simple base in the form of a landscape or waves was developed” (BSL, p. 30; and also see Ip, p. 164, #151; Watt Seattle, p. 89, #54). If the legs were independently indicated, there might be but a small pierced space between body and legs or the legs might be very short and stubby, barely emerging from the bulk of the material (D’Argence, p. 100, pl. XLIII; BSL, #75). Releasing the legs to function by themselves as believable supports for the weighty body, and allowing the tusks and trunk to emerge from the body, are workshop techniques associated with later periods. All three of the jade elephant sculptures in the Yangtze River Collection are upright, standing on four legs which are freed from the bulk of the material. The first of these examples depicts a rather charming if misshapen animal, short trunk upraised, lotus-shape ear carved in relief, eye area simplistically incised in a “sunrise” form, skin flaps more deeply incised, front legs gently bent, and back legs tucked under the hindquarters. A small curved tall briefly emerges from the hind end, and the back curves sharply away and down from the raised head. The entire configuration undoubtedly reflects the pebble or boulder form from which it was shaped. The shape and finish are relatively crude for the Qing and the ungainly body suggests an earlier date, but certain features such as the toe nail and eye delineations appear to be identical technically with the features of the following elephant, which is certainly not earlier than the mid-18th-19th century. The use of jadeite to fashion both elephants also indicates that these carvings are of a later date than would seem to be indicated by their style. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 5″ x 7.38″ x 2.5″. (12.7 x 18.7 x 6.4 cm.) CONDITION: Very good with variegated color, fissures and inclusions. 9-94917 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 53

Have a similar item you want to sell?

54

ARCHAISTIC DRAGON-HANDLED LIEN CONTAINER.

19th-early 20th century, China. Jadeite: pale to light reddish-purple. This shaped octagonal jade is a variation of a classic form known as a lien, a lidded container of cylindrical form. As with the gui, the essential shape has been updated by the addition of a complex of high-relief and free-form animals clambering about the shaped sides of the basic container. There are four animal head feet, with one open-mouthed animal mask and three chilong on the container itself, and the lid sports a full crouching fabulous animal. The lid can only be set on the container in one direction, with the head of its animal knob facing away from the handle. The baroque impression conveyed by the gui and this work, together with the quality of the finish, the nature of their material, and certain details of the animals as well as the processing of the low-relief decor areas, suggest that they were created by the same workshop. Though it lacks the large animals crawling about the exterior featured on the gui and this lien, the ding shares many of the same design elements, including the manner in which the feet are shaped. All three are elaborate reworkings of traditional contexts. The lien is a common later Bronze Age shape, appearing in a variety of media including earthenware and lacquer as well as bronze (Little, p. 38, #10). It was used as a food or cosmetic box. The revival instincts of Song artisans led to a renewed interest in this shape, and many were produced using jade, a fashionable material for imitating bronze-form objets d’art at this time (Gure, pl. 231, #4a-b; SNY 6/3/92, #5). With the advent of the Ming’s antiquarian movement there was again enthusiasm for this form. The increasing popularity of tea and wine drinking during that period led to the affixing of handles to the basic cylinder, so that it could be used to hold liquids (Keverne, p. 138, #25 and p. 143, #35; D’Argence, p. 114, Pl.L, illustrating a kung cup; Foster, p. 70, #114 and also Cardeiro, p. 152, Fig. 5; Ip, pp. 232-33, #209; Palm, p. 124, #128; Kerr, pp. 226-28; ACGB, pp. 99-100, #322). Qing period examples are known, including several with significant lug areas, as here (CSHK 3/19/90, #1036), so that this lien may be regarded as part of a long and continuing jade tradition with echoes of the bronze and lacquer past. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 6.25″ x 4.13″ x 2.88″. (15.9 x 10.5 x 7.3 cm.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-95010 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 54

Have a similar item you want to sell?

55

DOUBLE COUPE IN FLORAL FORM.

19th-20th century, China. Nephrite(?): white to pale greenish-gray with brown surface markings. A charmingly-shaped floral form double coupe, this small work has lingzhi fungal clouds in high relief decorating the front and back of the floral cups, while its gently everted lip simulates the edge of a flower. The ruddy color splotches lend an interest to the otherwise relatively plain surface. The work needs a wood support to hold it upright. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 2.75″ x 5.5″ x 1.38″. (7 x 14 x 3.5 cm.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-95011 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 55

Have a similar item you want to sell?

56

MASSIVE SCULPTED ARCHAISTIC GUI.

19th-20th century, China. Nephrite: grayish yellow-green with darker and lighter patches and overall mottling. Knob added to lid. With precedents in early Western Zhou period (11th-early 10th century b.c.) bronzes, such as the well-known Metropolitan Museum example (Roberts, p. 16, #8), or the Beijing Cultural Relics Bureau example with its high stand and compound dragon handles (Bagley, p. 231, #57; and also Beijing, #44), this massive scalloped edge gui has a complex structure and a highly baroque appearance. The form was one of the three favorite bronze forms of the scholar’s studio of the later Ming, and often imitated at that time in updated metal versions as well as in other media such as small jades (Moss, pp. 287-8, #142; Li, #51). Bronze precedents for the Qing jade gui are illustrated in the Xiqing gu jian (Lawton, p. 54, fig. 5 and figs. 11-12), one of the Qing catalogues commissioned by the Qianlong emperor, and close copies of these metal works appear in jades dated to the 18th century. The lid of this jade gui, with its elaborate chrysanthemum collar and two relief chilong (immature dragons), repeats certain earlier Qing versions (lp, pp. 254-5, #227; Hai, p. 200, #198), and the thick independently moving ring handles are a feature much favored in the 18th century, when they were first accomplished with relative ease by the jade workshop artists (Watt Seattle, p. 121). A dragon-turtle, strutting around the base, carries a smoking incense vase on its back with a bat caught in the smoke; there are also two chilong carved in high relief on the base, repeating a theme found first on the lid. The squat flat-bottomed base has a low polish, and a shaped interior ridge for secure placement of the lid; the interior is essentially unpolished. The base, with its deeply-carved large scale double bands of decor, the complex set of handles for lid and base, and most of all the freestanding carving of the animal built out from the base of the vessel, however, proclaim the taste for large, elaborate, and technologically proficient works characteristic of the late Qing, including the court of the Dowager Empress. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 8.25″ x 12.25″ x 7.5″. (21 x 31.1 x 19.1 cm.) CONDITION: Well carved. Good overall. 9-94994 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 56

Have a similar item you want to sell?

57

MUGHAL STYLE “CAMPHOR” JADE SEAL INK BOX.

Mid-Qing Dynasty, 18th century, China. Jadeite: Sugary “Snowflake” white. In recent years, jade researchers have become increasingly interested in penetrating the history of Mughal and Mughal-style jade and hardstone carvings (Skelton, “Islamic and Mughal Jades”, in Keverne, pp. 273-95; Watt Seattle, pp. 111-13). It is apparent that the original Mughal Empire carvings which made their way to the court of the Qing emperors strongly influenced the late 18th century jade workshops associated with court patronage, but that the ultimate Chinese response was to produce a type of carving based on, but recognizably distinguishable from, the Indian (“Hindustan”) prototypes. Thin-walled chrysanthemum-motif white nephrite carvings, as exemplified by this “camphor” jade seal-ink box, become one of the standard Chinese responses to the Mughal influence (Ip, p. 256, #230; Watt, p. 121, #104; Na, pp. 165, 167, #336-27; SHK 11/14/90, #572). There are three layers of petals on the top and three on the base, with the second base layer serving as a foot rim. The center of each of the two chrysanthemums has crosshatching. As with the jade bowls in this collection, there is a difference in the level of polish on interior and exterior, the interior of this seal ink box displaying a higher polish than the exterior. The extreme thinness of the translucent walls is typically Chinese, just as the fluting of the sides reflects Mughal taste. The Mughal emphasis on formality of floral decor, so evident here, is in great contrast to the naturalistic treatment of floral forms in the Chinese fashion. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 1.38″ x 2.63″ dia. (3.5 x 6.7 cm dia.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-95009 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 57

Have a similar item you want to sell?

58

OVOID BRUSH HOLDER WITH SWAG AND GARDEN MOTIF.

20th century, China. Nephrite: Grayish yellow-green with brown areas. A graceful, gently swelling yet stable form, this brush holder has a curving rim, the shape of which is emphasized by the device of a swag curtain which appears to drape over the top edge. The lower portion of the brusholder has a continuous frieze of a garden setting with ladies demonstrating their achievements with the Four Accomplishments (such as musical ability). Some are seated while others stand, and all are raised in high relief against a flat background with incised details of the house. The elegant garden is planted with pines and banana trees. Even though the theme is hackneyed, the high degree of realistic detail in the furniture and vegetation raises the aesthetic level of the work beyond the ordinary, and the bi-toned material from which the carving is fashioned further contributes to the pleasing overall effect. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 6.5″ x 6″ x 3.75″. (16.5 x 15.2 x 9.5 cm.) CONDITION: Well carved in relief with russet markings. Very good. 9-95197 (2,500-3,500) – Lot 58

Have a similar item you want to sell?

59

ORNATE ARCHAISTIC DING WITH DRAGON HANDLES.

19th-20th century, China. Jadeite: uneven, pale green tones. Taking the shape of late Zhou bronzes, with all the elegance of proportion that implies, this ding (tripod) borrows other ideas from the past, such as the animal head handles, the independently-turning rings, the gracefully curved legs topped by a coiffured animal head, and a lid which, when reversed, can function as a dish or stand. The lid is sculpted with a knob in the design of a snarling, curling dragon, and the legs have delicately clawed terminations, further evidence of the continuing interest in animalia as active decoration from the Bronze Age directly through the later Qing. The body of the well-polished work is covered with large-scale low relief taotie (animal mask) designs, which are repeated on a smaller scale on the lid; on both body and lid this major design is interrupted directly at the snout area by other designs imposed over the surface. The toothed-dragon handles emphatically protrude from the shoulder, and vegetative scroll forms issue from the creatures’ mouths. The pupils of the eyes of all animals are indicated by an incised circle. The associated rings are ponderous, and larger on the base than on the top, a reasonable diminution of proportions that appears on carefully considered hardstone vessels of the later Qing. An unusual device of entwined lingzhi (magic fungus) forms serves to support the rings on the lid. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 9″ x 10.5″ x 6.75″. (22.9 x 26.7 x 17.1 cm.) CONDITION: Fissures visible on interior. Very good. 9-94913 (1,500-2,000) – Lot 59

Have a similar item you want to sell?

60

TWO YOUTHS ENCASED IN A PHOENIX SHELTER.

Probably 20th century, China. Jadeite: Natural boulder with weathered brown surface and light greenish-gray inclusions. The exterior of this large jade boulder has been decorated with a low-relief, ruddy brown matte texture decoration portraying a phoenix with wings outstretched to engulf the top and sides of the pebble-form boulder; a similar matte-finished low-relief brown-toned lotus-leaf pattern adorns the reverse. On the front (upper side) of this unusual work an opening reveals a polished white jade interior scene of two young figures resting in bed, a convincingly-modeled blanket pulled up to their waists. They both wear stomach warmers and bracelets, and while the one on the right carries a pomegranate, the one on the left holds a lotus pod with the seeds prominently displayed. There appear to be no known comparable carvings, although this writer recently saw in a Singapore antique store a single large boulder carving with a very similar ruddy, matte low-relief decorated exterior; however, it lacked the internal figural aspect of the present sculpture. Although the subject of this intriguing lap-size carving is obscure, there have been several suggestions as to a possible identification, the most convincing of which posits that the work illustrates “… the brother and sister who survive the Great Flood by floating to safety in a hu-lu (calabash) gourd”, a theme found among the southern minorities (Henricks). How else to explain this phoenix-wrapped form with its opening revealing two youths, except that since they both bear fertility objects (the pomegranate and lotus pod) with the implied wish for many children, this may be some type of fertility object. Their accoutrements of stomachers and bracelets are similar to those decorating the boy-shaped pillows so popular in later Chinese jade carvings. Certainly the popular pair of the Ho Ho Erhxian never took this form. While this carving appears endlessly fascinating, its date and content have still to be determined. Reference: The Yangtze River Collection, Later Chinese Jades published by Helga Wall-Apelt, 1993. SIZE: 6.38″ x 20.25″ x 9″. (16.2 x 51.4 x 22.9 cm.) CONDITION: Very good. 9-95513 (500-700) – Lot 60

Have a similar item you want to sell?

61

FOUR BRONZE MIRRORS.

Sun to Ming dynasty, China. Two foliate edge mirrors. One with dragons, the other with a landscape and two other mirrors: one with dragons and the other with a scholar in a garden. SIZE: Largest: 8″ dia. CONDITION: Two with minor and two with moderate pitting and corrosion. 9-95454 (300-500) – Lot 61

Have a similar item you want to sell?

62

ARCHAIC STYLE JADE DISC & EXTREMELY LARGE GREEN JADE AXE.

China. Disc: 19th Century. Chou style disc decorated with grain patterns. Jade axe of typical form. 2) Possibly Liangchu period (BC 4500-6000), neolithic style axe blade with two pierced holes. SIZE: Disc: 12-3/4″ dia. Axe: 14″ x 5-3/4″. CONDITION: Disk with oxidation, very good. Blade heavily veined, very good 9-95471 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 62

Have a similar item you want to sell?

63

THREE JADE DRAGON PLAQUES.

1) Han style and possibly of the period, China. Tan colored weathered stone. 2) Probably later Han style, China. Pair of two confronting kuei dragons above a tao tieh mask. Tan and reddish stone considerably calcified. 3) Han style and possibly of the period, China. Carved with scrolling bodies around a pressed lozenge shape. Stone of a red-brown color. SIZE: 1) 2-1/2″ x 1-1/2″. 2) 2-1/2″ x 2″. 3) 3-1/4″ x 2″. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95257, 95313, 95335 (800-1,200) – Lot 63

Have a similar item you want to sell?

64

LARGE SILVERED BRONZE MIRROR.

T’ang Period (618-920), China, Bronze mirror with hound and grapes and a long inscription. SIZE: 8-1/2″ dia. CONDITION: Moderate corrosion and pitting, typical wear due to age. 9-95453 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 64

Have a similar item you want to sell?

65

BRONZE MIRROR.

Han Period (206 BC-226 AD), China or Central Asia. Square form, Ordos style decoration of mythical animals. SIZE: 3-1/4″ sq. CONDITION: Moderate corrosion and pitting. 9-95456 (300-500) – Lot 65

Have a similar item you want to sell?

66

TWO JADE DRAGON PENDANTS.

1) Warring states style and possibly of the period, China. Stone of an amber color. 2) Probably Han period, China. With engraved scrolling on the surfaces. Striated amber colored stone. SIZE: 1) 3″ x 1-1/4″. 2) 2-5/8″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95246, 95258 (800-1,200) – Lot 66

Have a similar item you want to sell?

67

ARCHAIC COVERED BRONZE VESSEL.

Cast with horned animal heads alternating with scrolling reserves, raised on three pairing legs. SIZE: 8-1/2″ h x 9″ d. CONDITION: Heavily corroded and with verdigris. 9-95499 (300-500) – Lot 67

Have a similar item you want to sell?

68

SEVEN ANCIENT BRONZES.

Han Dynasty, China. Includes three garment hooks, a dagger axe and three figural groups. Some with traces of gilt. SIZE: Largest 9″ l. CONDITION: One animal with loss to the legs and tail, all with verdigris and/or corrosion. 9-95530 (1,500-2,000) – Lot 68

Have a similar item you want to sell?

69

BRONZE DAGGER AXE.

Western Chou style and possibly of the period (9th c BC), China. K’o with a bird of prey flange on one side. Thick malachite patina with areas of azurite. SIZE: 11″ l. CONDITION: no apparent losses, green tarnishing and oxidation typical of age. Small repair to tip of blade. 9-95476 (300-500) – Lot 69

Have a similar item you want to sell?

70

CARVED SANDSTONE BUDDHA.

Probably Northern Ch’i Period (550-577), China. Standing figure of Avalokiteshvara in flowing robes. SIZE: 17″ l. CONDITION: Wear consistent with age, some losses along edges. 9-95527 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 70

Have a similar item you want to sell?

71

CARVED AND LACQUERED SHAVING STAND.

Late 19th century. The crest carved in deep relief depicting a court scene flanked by dragons above circular mirror with a carved panel above reticulated and carved panel of court scene raised on simulated bamboo supports. The hinged conforming frontal legs arranged to hold a bowl. SIZE: 66″ h x 26″ w. CONDITION: Structurally good with mostly intact gilt painted and lacquered surfaces. 9-94957 (200-300) – Lot 71

Have a similar item you want to sell?

72

SQUARE BACK ELM ARMCHAIR IN BLACK LACQUER WITH GILT HIGHLIGHTS.

The crestrail with raised center continuing to back curved stiles centering a rectangular splat with caned panel of grapes joined to the rectangular panel section raised on cylindrical legs with reticulated carved frontal gilt and painted apron above a flattened foot rest, all joined by a box stretcher. The whole in black paint. SIZE: 42″ h of back , 20″ h of seat x 23″ w. CONDITION: Structurally good. Painted surface soiled. 9-94960 (300-500) – Lot 72

Have a similar item you want to sell?

73

UNSIGNED (Chinese, 19th Century) PAIR OF ANCESTRAL PORTRAITS.

Oil on silk Housed in simple black painted wood frames Unsigned SIZE: 67-1/2″ h x 36-1/2″ w. Overall: 71″ x 40″ CONDITION: Fair with cracking and stain 9-95529 (500-700) – Lot 73

Have a similar item you want to sell?

74

FOUR TIER STACKING CABINET IN RED WASH LACQUER.

Chinese. Two upper sections with gilt decorated and black lacquer cabinet doors, each with carved gilt scenes of figures in courtyards, the bottom section with pair of paneled doors carved with floral covered tables. SIZE: 70-1/2″ h x 30″ w x 19″ d. CONDITION: Generally good. 9-94911 (400-600) – Lot 74

Have a similar item you want to sell?

75

HARD WOOD BENCH WITH ARMS.

20th century, China. Latticework back joined to rectangular arms on square supports centering a conforming rectangular panel seat raised on inset molded legs with shaped returns. SIZE: 37-1/2″ h of bench x 71″ l. CONDITION: Structurally good. 9-94959 (600-800) – Lot 75

Have a similar item you want to sell?

76

CANED TEAK AND ELM STAND.

19th-20th century. The square panel top above the caned and molded frieze raised on square legs joined by molded and shaped box stretcher. SIZE: 40″ h. Top: 18″ x 18-1/2″. CONDITION: Very good. 9-94987 (500-700) – Lot 76

Have a similar item you want to sell?

77

CARVED PINE SETTEE.

20th century, China. Rectangular open back with three horizontal slats joined by an arrangement of vertical mortised supports joined to arms centering a panel plank seat raised on square legs with pierced shaped returns. SIZE: 36″ h of back x 73″ l. CONDITION: Structurally good. 9-94986 (600-800) – Lot 77

Have a similar item you want to sell?

78

PAIR OF HORSESHOE BACK ELM ARMCHAIRS.

19th century. Each curved back continuing to sloping arms centering a shaped splat with caned rondel, the stiles each with carved returns joined to rectangular plank seat with inset panel. Raised on rounds legs with shaped molded frontal borders, joined by box stretcher and flattened footrest. SIZE: 36″ h of back, 20″ h of seat, 23-1/2″ w. CONDITION: Original red lacquer removed. Now polished. One curved arm support needs re-attaching. Repair on crestrails. 9-94907, 9-94908 (600-800) – Lot 78

Have a similar item you want to sell?

79

LARGE ELM PEDESTAL DESK.

20th century, China. Rectangular paneled top with molded apron and center drawer raised on pedestals, each with a bank of two molded drawers on molded legs above an open shelf. SIZE: 35″ h x 70″ l x 38″ d. CONDITION: Very good. 9-94912 (800-1,200) – Lot 79

Have a similar item you want to sell?

80
Revised: 3/19/2015

Please Note: Purchased by Dr. Wall-Apelt from the Kang Collection Korean Fine Art, NY in 2007

YUN YONG-GU (Korean, 1852-1939) CALLIGRAPHY.

Ink on silk Housed in natural wood frame SIZE: 53″ x 15-1/2″. Overall 65″ x 21-3/4″ CONDITION: Good 9-95138 (800-1,200) – Lot 80

Have a similar item you want to sell?

81
Revised: 3/19/2015

Please Note: Purchased by Dr. Wall-Apelt from the Kang Collection Korean Fine Art, NY in 2007

YUN YONG-GU (Korean, 1852-1939) CALLIGRAPHY.

Ink on silk Housed in natural wood frame SIZE: 53″ x 15-1/2″. Overall 65″ x 21-3/4″ CONDITION: Good 9-95137 (800-1,200) – Lot 81

Have a similar item you want to sell?

81a

AFTER HUANG TINGJIAN (Chinese, 1045-1105) CALLIGRAPHY HANDSCROLL.

Ink on paper of calligraphy in handscroll form. With several stamps & seals. SIZE: 20’2″ l x 17″ w. CONDITION: Generally very good with some creases & stains with various old repairs. 9-95174 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 81a

Have a similar item you want to sell?

82

CHINESE SCHOOL, ACCORDION ALBUM OF THE HEART SUTRA DATED THE 61ST YEAR OF THE K’ANG SHI PERIOD.

Accordion album mounted in a plexiglass frame. SIZE: 19-1/2″ h x 118″ overall. 13″ h album. CONDITION: Pages are crisp but some areas with foxing & wear & some staining along the edges. 9-94962 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 82

Have a similar item you want to sell?

83

MONUMENTAL AND EXTREMELY RARE PAIR OF CAST IRON BUDDHIST LIONS.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Seated figures, one with a cub, the other a brocade sphere. Auctioneer’s note: It is extraordinarily rare to find Chinese iron objects of this size and period today. Over the centuries as the demand for metal increased, objects such as these were melted down. These wonderful objects are truly rare in the iron form. SIZE: 45″ x 30″. CONDITION: Minor loss. 9-94983, 9-94984 (60,000-80,000) – Lot 83

Have a similar item you want to sell?

84

BUDDHIST SHRINE OF AMIDA.

19th century, Japan. Black lacquered case. Interior gold lacquered and painted with two figures. Central image of a standing Amida on a lotus throne. SIZE: 13-1/4″ x 4-1/2″. CONDITION: Surfaces of shrine case and figure darkened with age. 9-95431 (500-700) – Lot 84

Have a similar item you want to sell?

85

PAIR OF PORCELAIN JARS.

Meiji Period (1868-1912), Japan. Ginger jar form with drum style decoration of bosses and faux jump rings. Surface decorated in blue with ivory slip accents. Inter lids with molded chicken. Lids with cockerel finials. SIZE: 20″ h. CONDITION: Loss to tail feathers, finials and inserts as well as the edges of the covers restored. 9-95524 (300-500) – Lot 85

Have a similar item you want to sell?

86

BUDDHIST SHRINE OF KANNON.

19th century, Japan. Black lacquered case. Interior gold lacquered with a central image of a standing Kannon. SIZE: 13-1/4″ x 5″. CONDITION: Incense stained interior. Loss to crown. Surfaces of shrine case and figure darkened with age. Small losses to ornamentation. 9-95115 (300-500) – Lot 86

Have a similar item you want to sell?

87

IVORY CARVING OF KANNON.

Meiji Period, Japan. Standing figure of the Goddess of Mercy. Signed on the base. Special Note: This ivory has been examined and determined to be certified to be ESA Antique Elephant (Elaphantidae) ivory. Therefore, according to U.S. Fish & Wildlife current definition of commercial saleable ivory this object complies for domestic sale. SIZE: 5″. CONDITION: Very good. 9-95128 (300-500) – Lot 87

Have a similar item you want to sell?

88

IVORY WRIST REST.

18th/19th century, China. Intaglio carved with Buddhist saints in a mountain landscape. Reverse with the immortal Li Tung Pin. Accompanied by fitted blackwood stand. Special Note: This ivory has been examined and determined to be certified to be ESA Antique Elephant (Elaphantidae) ivory. Therefore, according to U.S. Fish & Wildlife current definition of commercial saleable ivory this object complies for domestic sale. SIZE: 12-1/2″ l. CONDITION: A few age lines. 9-95132 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 88

Have a similar item you want to sell?

89

CORAL CARVED MONKEY GROUP.

19th, early 20th century, China. Deep salmon pink color. Carving of monkeys and birds in a fruiting peach tree. SIZE: 8″ x 7″. CONDITION: Chips & roughness to some points. 9-95521 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 89

Have a similar item you want to sell?

90

THREE ROCK CRYSTAL CARVINGS.

Early 20th century, China and Japan. Includes a pair of foo dogs and a covered vase carved with kylin. SIZE: 3″ and 6″, respectively. CONDITION: Loss to lump ring on the vase and with inclusions, primarily to cover. Foo dogs with inclusions, one having discoloring to top. 9-95520 (300-500) – Lot 90

Have a similar item you want to sell?

91

BRONZE VASE WITH DRAGON.

Meiji Period (1868-1912), Japan. Vase with a bowl shaped base, trumpet flaring neck with foliate rim. Body with a sinuous dragon holding a glass jewel. SIZE: 20-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Very good overall with dark patina. 9-95493 (300-500) – Lot 91

Have a similar item you want to sell?

92

PAIR RED LACQUER AND MOTHER OF PEARL INLAID CABINETS.

K’ang Hsi period (1662-1722), China. Red lacquered surface decorated with birds and camellia plants. Black lacquer inset panels inlaid with figures in garden scenes in colored glass, mother of pearl and malachite. Bronze mounts cast with scrolling dragons. SIZE: 78″ x 50″ x 25″. CONDITION: Old repairs to both. Lacquer surface and stone inlaid panels generally good and original. 9-95206 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 92

Have a similar item you want to sell?

93

MASSIVE GILT LACQUER WOOD FIGURE OF VAIROCANA.

Previously sold at Christie’s New York, September 21, 2004, Lot #140 described as follows: LATE MING DYNASTY, 16TH/17TH CENTURY. Shown seated in padmasana with hands held in guanding yin, the mudra of annointing, wearing loose robes draped with a shawl that falls in graceful folds around the body, the broad face with gentle downcast expression, with black glass pupils, the hair dressed in small conical snail curls that are applied and painted dark blue, the top of the head with matching curls separately made, wearing a separate crown molded with a character, the robes and body in dark red lacquer that has been gilded and the inside of the robe, where visible, in bright red lacquer. Notes: The guanding yin, or abhiseka mudra, is used only by esoteric sects during rites of initiation, usually for the entry of a novice monk into the Buddhist order. There are significant similarities between the present figure and that of a small lacquered-wood figure of Guanyin illustrated by A. Priest, Chinese Sculpture in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1944, pl. CXXVIII, which can be dated to the year 1624 by a piece of silk found inside the figure that bears the date and the names of the donors. The Metropolitan Museum’s figure shares with the current figure similar treatment in the eye sockets, eye brows and realistically modelled nose and full lips, as well as simplified and elegant treatment of the drapery. The present figure also bears similarities to the Ming dynasty gilt and lacquered-wood figure of the seated Buddha illustrated in Ancient Chinese Sculptural Treasures: Carvings in Wood, Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, Taiwan, 1998, p. 49, no. 2. SIZE: 65-1/2″ h x 45″ w. CONDITION: Surfaces intact. Roughness around base. 9-94900 (40,000-60,000) – Lot 93

Have a similar item you want to sell?

94

CARVED STONE PLAQUE OF AVALOKITESHVARA.

N Chou Dynasty (557-581), China. Image depicted rising from a lotus flower. Areas of original color still remaining. SIZE: 34″ x 15″. CONDITION: Traces of polychrome paint remain. Loss at right arm and to top of headdress. 9-95080 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 94

Have a similar item you want to sell?

95

SIGNED (Japan, 20th Century) WATERMELON.

Mixed media including watercolor and ink on paper and gouache Housed in natural wood frame Calligraphic passage with identifying chops to right of image SIZE: 18-1/2″ x 23-1/2″. Overall 25″ x 34″. CONDITION: Good, staining to silk mount 9-95062 (100-150) – Lot 95

Have a similar item you want to sell?

96

TSUNEO SHIMAZAKI (Japan, 20th Century) “LONELY NIGHT”.

Acrylic on canvas Housed in a metal frame Signed lower right, identified in marker on verso, frame and stretcher NOTE: Tsuneo Shimazaki was born in Takasaki in 1933 and has exhibited at The Museum of Modern Art, Gunma, Takasaki SIZE: 68″ x 90″. Overall 69″ x 91″ CONDITION: Good. 9-94944 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 96

Have a similar item you want to sell?

97

YASUNORI FUKUSHIMA (Japan, 20th Century) “A COUPLE”.

Oil on canvas Housed in white wood frame Signed lower left, identified in marker on verso SIZE: 60″ x 65″. Overall 60-1/4″ x 65-1/4″. CONDITION: Good 9-94945 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 97

Have a similar item you want to sell?

98

TSUNEO SHIMAZAKI (Japan, 20th Century) “MARIA MAGDALENA”.

Oil on canvas with heavy impasto Housed in a contemporary black and gold frame Signed upper right, identified in marker on verso 65th anniversary exhibition NOTE: Tsuneo Shimazaki was born in Takasaki in 1933 and has exhibited at The Museum of Modern Art, Gunma, Takasaki SIZE: 63″ x 70″. Overall 66-1/2″ x 70-1/2″ CONDITION: Good 9-94946 (4,000-8,000) – Lot 98

Have a similar item you want to sell?

99

UNKNOWN (Japan, 2004) DOUBLE-SIDED PORTRAIT DRAWING.

Charcoal on paper Housed between plexiglass Identified in Chinese characters lower right and center left; recto dated “Jan. 3 2005″ SIZE: 23-1/2″ x 18”. Overall 27″ x 20-1/4″ CONDITION: Good 9-95061 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 99

Have a similar item you want to sell?

100

ARNAN RATCHAWANG-INN (Thai?, 1973-) “YOUNG GIRL WITH FLOWER”.

Acrylic on canvas Housed in contemporary black and gold frame Signed lower right, inscribed on canvas on verso and identified on Schoeni Gallery Hong Kong, label on verso, numbered “35” on verso SIZE: 40″ x 20″. Overall 45″ x 25-1/2″ CONDITION: Good 9-94942 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 100

Have a similar item you want to sell?

101

TAWATCHAI SOMKONG (Thai, 1964-) “ABSTRACT NO. 2” 2000.

Oil on canvas Housed in contemporary gold washed and silver frame Identified on Schoeni Gallery, Hong Kong label on verso, also inscribed “No A No. 12″ on stretcher bar SIZE: 38-1/2″ 33”. Overall 53-1/2″ x 46″ CONDITION: Good 9-94941 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 101

Have a similar item you want to sell?

102

PHANTHONG SAENCHUN (Thailand, 20th/21st Century) “NO 2”.

Acrylic on canvas Unframed Signed and dated “2001” lower left, identified on Schoeni Gallery, Hong Kong label on verso Phanthong’s inspiration for paintings mainly comes from Buddha images, to which he adds his own imagination and personal feelings. NOTE: Phanthong’s paintings have been exhibited at many occasions and galleries nationwide. The majority of his artwork is displayed in his home and art studio in Phan, a quiet village near Chiang Rai City. SIZE: 37″ x 39″ CONDITION: Good 9-94940 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 102

Have a similar item you want to sell?

103

PHANTHONG SAENCHUN (Thailand, 1965-) “NO 1”.

Acrylic on canvas Unframed Signed and dated “2001” lower left, identified on Schoeni Gallery, Hong Kong label on verso Phanthong’s inspiration for paintings mainly comes from Buddha images, to which he adds his own imagination and personal feelings. NOTE: Phanthong’s paintings have been exhibited at many occasions and galleries nationwide. The majority of his artwork is displayed in his home and art studio in Phan, a quiet village near Chiang Rai City. SIZE: 37″ x 39″ CONDITION: Good 9-94939 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 103

Have a similar item you want to sell?

104

BRONZE BUDDHA.

19th century, Thailand. Ayuthaya style. Accompanied by stand. SIZE: 23″ h. CONDITION: Unisha missing. 9-95039 (2,000-2,500) – Lot 104

Have a similar item you want to sell?

105

TEN INDIAN AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN BRONZES.

19th century and earlier. Including eight deities from India together with two Thai works. SIZE: Largest: 7″. Smallest: 2-1/2″. CONDITION: Nine good to very good with appropriate wear. One with corrosion and losses to base. 9-95169 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 105

Have a similar item you want to sell?

106

BRONZE BUDDHA.

19th century, Thailand. Hands in the “earth witnessing” mudra. SIZE: 27″ h. CONDITION: Break to the neck. 9-95038 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 106

Have a similar item you want to sell?

107

BRONZE BUDDHA.

19th century, Burma. Standing figure with hands in the position of calming waters. SIZE: 24″ h. CONDITION: Repair to right arm. Casting flaws on back. Good color and patina. 9-95515 (300-500) – Lot 107

Have a similar item you want to sell?

108

BRONZE BUDDHIST DEITY.

20th century or earlier, Indonesia. Image of Vishnu in his dwarf avatar? SIZE: 7-1/2″ h x 6″ w. CONDITION: Light corrosion throughout. 9-95427 (100-150) – Lot 108

Have a similar item you want to sell?

109

BRONZE BUDDHA.

Sukho Tai Style, probably 19th century, Thailand. Seated figure with hands in the “earth witnessing” position. SIZE: 28″ h. CONDITION: Undisturbed surface with good patina. 9-95496 (1,500-2,500) – Lot 109

Have a similar item you want to sell?

110

THREE BRONZE IMAGES.

20th century, Thailand. Two standing figures of the Buddha in Sukhothai style together with a standing figure of Vishnu in U-Thong style. SIZE: 8″, 6″ and 12″, respectively. CONDITION: Vishnu figure has casting flaws to the body, otherwise good. 9-95449 (300-500) – Lot 110

Have a similar item you want to sell?

111

STANDING BRONZE FIGURE OF BUDDHA.

Probably Ayuthaya Period (16th century), Thailand. Shell and obsidian inlaid eyes. Hands in “calming the waters” and “witnessing” mudras. SIZE: 18-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Damage to the feet, otherwise good with dark, even patina. 9-95036 (500-700) – Lot 111

Have a similar item you want to sell?

112

BRONZE BUDDHA.

Ayuthaya period, probably 17th century, Thailand. “Earth witnessing” position. Traces of gold lacquer remaining on the surface. SIZE: 17″ h. CONDITION: Small repair to stomach. Losses to rim of base. 9-95514 (300-500) – Lot 112

Have a similar item you want to sell?

113

BRONZE SEATED BUDDHA.

Possibly Ayuthaya period, circa 1600, Thailand. Seated figure in the “earth witnessing” position. Large areas of malachite patination. SIZE: 21″. CONDITION: Retains pennants of paint. Good surfaces with corrosion. 9-95501 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 113

Have a similar item you want to sell?

114

SEATED BRONZE FIGURE OF BUDDHA.

Ayuthaya Period, 17th century, Thailand. Depicting a seated figure of the Buddha in the earth witnessing mudra. SIZE: 20″ x 10-3/4″. CONDITION: Damage to the base with loss, otherwise good with dark, even patina. 9-95028 (700-900) – Lot 114

Have a similar item you want to sell?

115

LARGE BRONZE STANDING FIGURE OF BUDDHA.

U Thong style, 16th century, Thailand. Standing figure with calming the waters mudra. Traces of gilding remaining. Shell inlaid eyes. Accompanied by stand. SIZE: 41″. CONDITION: Piece missing at top of head, crack to the body. Otherwise good. 9-94985 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 115

Have a similar item you want to sell?

116

ELEVEN JADE PENDANTS & CARVINGS.

1) Jade pi disk pendant. Han style but probably of a later period, China. Disk with two chih lung. Grey green stone. 2) Archaic jade pi disk carving. Warring States (4-2nd c BC), China. Pi disk with two flanking dragons. Surface covered with archaic scrolling. Gray green stone with large amounts of ochre. 3) Jade carving. Han style and possibly of the period, China. Disk shape carved and pierced with a mythical anthropomorphized animal figure blowing a conch shell trumpet. Winged animal figure final. Stone of an olive green color. 4) Oval jade pendant. Warring states style and possibly of the period, China. Green and tan stone heavily calcified. Carved in the form of an oval pierced disk with two chih lung and surface engraving. 5) Shield shaped archaic jade pendant. Han Period (2nd c BC-2nd c AD), China. With a pierced center and a pair of sinuous chih lung. Stone of a celadon color with large areas of russet. 6) Archaic style jade disk of Chih Lung. Han style and possibly of the period, China. Oval pierced disk with engraved chih lung projecting and relief scrolling decoration. Black jade with calcification. 7) Jade carving of a tiger & a snake. Style of the Northern and Southern Dynasties (4-6 c AD) and possibly of the period, China. Carved white stone with red veining. 8) Jade pi disk. Probably Sung Period (960-1279), China. Carved with chih lung in relief. Stone of a highly translucent gray-white color with brown areas. 9) Jade ring carved in shape of a tiger. Shang style, China. Russet stone with green markings. 10) Jade ritual disk. 19th century, China. Hsuan chi form with engraved bird standard glyph. Gray green jade. 11) Oval shaped jade pendant. Han period (2nd c BC-2nd c AD), China. With a pierced center. Decoration of a phoenix and tiger with archaic scrolling. Stone of an “onion skin” color with areas of bright red. SIZE: 1) 3-1/4″ l. 2) 4-1/2″ x 2. 3) 3-1/2″ x 2-3/4″. 4) 3″ x 1-1/2″. 5) 2-3/4″ x 2-1/4″. 6) 3″ x 2-1/2″. 7) 3-1/2″ x 2″. 8) 3-1/2″ dia. 9) 2-3/4″ dia. 10) 3″ dia. 11) 3-1/2″ x 2″. CONDITION: Generally very good with appropriate age wear. 3) Finial’s head worn off. 7) Area of erosion to the tiger’s nose. 10) Eroded surface. 9-95220, 9-95232, 9-95235, 9-95248, 9-95251, 9-95252, 9-95300, 9-95306, 9-95341, 9-95348, 9-95351 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 116

Have a similar item you want to sell?

117

TWO CARVED JADE PIECES.

1) 19th century, China. Surface skin carved in low relief with waves, pine trees and rocks. Stone of a green white color. 2) 19th century, China. Gray stone carved as a foo dog with a brocade ball. SIZE: 1) 2-3/4″ l. 2) 3″ x 2″. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 2) Chip to one interior attachment boss. Crack to one side. 9-95363, 95370 (600-800) – Lot 117

Have a similar item you want to sell?

118

JADE CARVING OF TWO FELINE FIGURES.

19th century or earlier, China. Celadon color with pronounced areas of russet. Finely polished. SIZE: 2-1/4″ x 1-1/2″. CONDITION: Very good with no evident damage. 9-95397 (300-500) – Lot 118

Have a similar item you want to sell?

119

CAT & RABBIT JADE PENDANTS.

1) 19th century or earlier, China. Gray white stone with pronounced russet markings. 2) 19th century or earlier, China. Highly translucent grey stone. SIZE: 1) 6″ l. 2) 2-1/4″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear & natural inclusions to side of rabbit example. 9-95364, 9-95373 (600-900) – Lot 119

Have a similar item you want to sell?

120

EIGHT JADES.

20th century, China. Includes a butterfly, a pair of fish, a tiger, a disk with chih lung, a dragon, a female dancer, a marine study and a group of pea pods. SIZE: Largest: 3″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95385 (300-500) – Lot 120

Have a similar item you want to sell?

121

JADE PLAQUES FOR A BELT.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. 19 pieces. Carved and pierced with a dragon and firmament design. Stone of a gray celadon color. SIZE: Largest 2-3/4″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95542 (300-500) – Lot 121

Have a similar item you want to sell?

122

JADE COVERED JAR.

18th/19th century, China. Archaic ritual form. Surfaces carved and engraved with tao tieh masks, cicada motifs, thunder meanders and other scrolling. Green jade with pronounced russet markings. SIZE: 5″ h x 3″ w. CONDITION: Small chips to the mouth & base edge, otherwise very good. 9-95528 (300-500) – Lot 122

Have a similar item you want to sell?

123

SECTIONAL JADE DISK.

19th century, China. Nine pieces carved with chih lung in relief. Stone of a gray celadon color. SIZE: 3-1/2″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95484 (300-500) – Lot 123

Have a similar item you want to sell?

124

TEN JADES.

19th-20th century, China. Includes two fish groups, a double gourd, a lotus plant, a human figure, a dog, a pierced disk, a cylinder, a cicada and a pebble pierced with a hole. SIZE: Largest about 3″. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95390 (300-500) – Lot 124

Have a similar item you want to sell?

125

EIGHT JADES.

Probably 20th century, China. Includes two fish, a group of turtles, a ram, a kylin, a human figure, a pebble carved with prunus and an archaic disk. SIZE: Largest about 4″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95388 (300-500) – Lot 125

Have a similar item you want to sell?

126

THREE JADE ARCHER’S RINGS.

One with reticulated carving. SIZE: 1″ – 1-1/4″ dia. CONDITION: Very good. 9-95210 (300-500) – Lot 126

Have a similar item you want to sell?

127

MOTTLED YELLOWISH JADE CARVING OF A CARP.

Ming dynasty (1368-1644) or later, China. Jade carved in yellow jade with amber russet markings. Two suspension holes at the top fins. SIZE: 7-3/4″ l x 3-1/4″ w. CONDITION: Very good. 9-95205 (300-500) – Lot 127

Have a similar item you want to sell?

128

JADE CARVED STUDY OF THE THREE FRUITS.

20th century, China. Fruits include “San Duo” Buddha’s hand citron, peach and pomegranate with foliage. Stone of a gray color. SIZE: 5-1/2″ x 3″. CONDITION: Chip to the foliage, numerous fissures. 9-95199 (300-500) – Lot 128

Have a similar item you want to sell?

129

NINE JADES.

20th century, China. Includes two bracelets, a figure of the god of longevity, a pi disk, a cicada, a section of bamboo, a ram, a lavender and green figure of Mi Lo Fu and a jade pebble. SIZE: Largest: 5-3/4″ l. CONDITION: Pi disk with natural fissure, one bracelet with small hairline,one figure with natural fissure lines. 9-95181 (300-500) – Lot 129

Have a similar item you want to sell?

130

JADE PENDANT CARVED AS A SMALL BOY.

19th century, China. Gray stone with tan markings. Figure with a pomegranate. SIZE: 1-3/4″ l. CONDITION: Minor roughness to base & robe tip. 9-95362 (300-500) – Lot 130

Have a similar item you want to sell?

131

TWO JADES.

19th and 20th century, China. Carved as a pair of ducks and a miniature rhyton with a dragon’s head. SIZE: 3″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95377 (300-500) – Lot 131

Have a similar item you want to sell?

132

EIGHT JADES.

19th-20th century, China. Includes a carving with a chih lung and a phoenix, a group of pumpkins, a human figure, an Archaic disk, a kylin group, a buddha’s hand citron, an elephant and an oval box. SIZE: Largest: 4-1/4″. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95386 (300-500) – Lot 132

Have a similar item you want to sell?

133

THREE JADE PENDANTS DEPICTING FRUIT/GOURDS.

1) 19th century, China. Green-white stone. Melons carved with foliage. 2 & 3) 19th century, China. Stones of a gray-celadon color with russet markings. SIZE: 1) 2″ l. 2) 3″ l. 3) 2″ l. CONDITION: Minor roughness, generally good with typical age wear. 9-95361, 95378 (800-1,200) – Lot 133

Have a similar item you want to sell?

134

JADE PENDANT CARVED AS ARCHAIC RITUAL PI.

19th century, China. White jade carved with a moveable center and flanking pairs of dragons. Surface carved with grain patterns and silk worm marks. SIZE: 2-1/2″ x 1-1/2″. CONDITION: Minor roughness with typical age wear. 9-95358 (300-500) – Lot 134

Have a similar item you want to sell?

135

TILE SHAPED JADE PLAQUE.

Warring states style, possibly 18th century, China. With carvings of 4 rams heads in relief around a central tao tieh mask with scrolling borders. Stone of a gray brown color. SIZE: 2-3/4″ x 2-1/2″. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95301 (300-500) – Lot 135

Have a similar item you want to sell?

136

THREE JADE BANGLES.

1) China. Rope shaped. Stone of an “onion skin” color. 2) Warring states style, China. Surface carved with 2 tao tieh bosses and T and L pierced scrolling. Heavily calcified brown-green stone. 3) 19th century or earlier, China. Pale green jade with the surface carved with a grain pattern. SIZE: 1) Interior: 2-1/2″ dia. 2) 3-1/2″ d. 3) 3″ dia. CONDITION: Very good with typical wear. 3) Small/minor chips along edge. 9-95283, 95344, 95366 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 136

Have a similar item you want to sell?

137

PAIR OF JADE BRACELETS.

18th/19th century, China. White jade carved as two interlocking ribbons. SIZE: 3″ dia. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95273 (300-500) – Lot 137

Have a similar item you want to sell?

138

JADE PENDANT.

Neolithic Period (2nd c BC), China. Oval double form with two piercings. Stone a pale green color with russet markings. Small rim area of calcification. Accompanied by old collector’s box. SIZE: 2-1/2″ x 2″. CONDITION: Very good. 9-95281 (300-500) – Lot 138

Have a similar item you want to sell?

139

JADE ARCHAIC RITUAL DISK.

Probably 19th century, China. Stone of a highly translucent pale celadon color with brown and russet markings. One side carved in high relief with 9 chih lung, the reverse with grain patterns. SIZE: 9-1/2″ dia. CONDITION: Natural fissures. 9-95176 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 139

Have a similar item you want to sell?

140

PARCEL GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF “GREEN TARA”.

19th century, Nepal. Figure of Quanyin wearing headdress and with flowers at each arm. Seated on a lotus throne. SIZE: 8″ h. CONDITION: Well detailed with even patina. Gilding intact. 9-95130 (300-500) – Lot 140

Have a similar item you want to sell?

141

BUDDHIST BRONZE.

19th century, Burma. Shan style image of a seated Buddha with hands in the “earth witnessing” mudra. Engraved details (Burma 1944 Brownie on the base). SIZE: 12″. CONDITION: Head has been re-attached and large horizontal firing crack to back and base. 9-95207 (300-500) – Lot 141

Have a similar item you want to sell?

142

BRONZE MODEL OF A HORSE.

18th/19th century or earlier, India. Caparisoned horse devotional image. Surface with inscriptions in Sanskrit. Well worn surfaces. SIZE: 16″ h x 14″ l. CONDITION: Damage to one hoof. Bases bent. 9-95425 (300-500) – Lot 142

Have a similar item you want to sell?

143

BRONZE STANDING FIGURE OF AVALABASHAVRA.

19th/20th century, Nepal. Standing figure of Tara in princely regalia. Standing on a double lotus pedestal. SIZE: 36″ h. CONDITION: Old repairs to backs of legs. Otherwise good surfaces. Flame fan absent. 9-95500 (300-500) – Lot 143

Have a similar item you want to sell?

144

BUDDHIST BRONZE IMAGE.

19th century or earlier, Burma. Shan style figure of a seated Buddha in the earth witnessing mudra. Finely engraved surface scrolling and a long inscription at the back. SIZE: 11-3/4″ h x 6-1/4″ w. CONDITION: Now with verdigris and slight corrosion. Structurally good. 9-95107 (500-700) – Lot 144

Have a similar item you want to sell?

145

LOT OF TEN GRADUATING WEIGHTS.

19th/20th century, Burma. Group of 9 bronze weights in the form of animals together with a figure of a man. SIZE: Figure: 5-1/2″ h. Largest weight: 3-1/2″, others about 2″. CONDITION: Loss to object in the man’s hand, shows wear. 9-95172 (800-1,200) – Lot 145

Have a similar item you want to sell?

146

TEN MINIATURE BRONZE FIGURES.

19th century or earlier, Asia. Includes 5 Indian bronze figures of deities, 4 Buddhas from China or Thailand, together with a small Khmer divinity. SIZE: Largest: 6-1/4″. Smallest: about 2-1/2″. CONDITION: All with old surfaces. Reclining figure with cracks in plinth. Figure on lucite missing one hand. All with normal wear. 9-95173 (800-1,200) – Lot 146

Have a similar item you want to sell?

147

BRONZE STRIDING FIGURE OF BUDDHA.

19th/20th century, Thailand. Bronze carved Buddha. SIZE: 51″ h overall x 32″. CONDITION: Variegated patina. Otherwise good. 9-95111 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 147

Have a similar item you want to sell?

148

GRAY SANDSTONE SEATED FIGURE OF GANESHA.

Cambodia, stone sculpture, elephant god. SIZE: 19″ h x 11″ w. CONDITION: Typical wear due to age. 9-95029 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 148

Have a similar item you want to sell?

151

STANDING CARVED STONE FIGURE OF VISHNU.

17th/18th century, Southeast Asia style stone Buddha sculpture. Accompanied by stand. SIZE: Statue: 32″ h. Overall: 35″ h. CONDITION: Loss of all four forearms and hands. 9-95030 (10,000-15,000) – Lot 151

Have a similar item you want to sell?

152

GRAY LIMESTONE SEATED FIGURE.

Possibly 11th/12th century, Burma. Stone Buddha sculpture. SIZE: 22″ h. CONDITION: Weathered surface generally good. Head may be re-attached at shoulders. 9-95034 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 152

Have a similar item you want to sell?

153

HARDSTONE TORSO OF A FEMALE DEITY.

Probably 13th century, India. Stone sculpture, lady figure. SIZE: overall 24″ h. CONDITION: Hands/head missing. 9-95008 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 153

Have a similar item you want to sell?

154

SANDSTONE MODEL OF A MYTHICAL LION.

20th century. Stone sculpture, possibly Cambodia or Burma, sandstone. Accompanied by stand. SIZE: 28″ h overall x 32″ w. CONDITION: Weathered surface. Old loss of tail at rump and to tip. Loss of all feet. 9-94990 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 154

Have a similar item you want to sell?

155

BRONZE BUDDHA.

Probably 13th century, Cambodia. Standing figure of the Buddha in “calming of the waters” mudra. SIZE: 15″ h. CONDITION: Old repair to the right side of the robe, otherwise with dark, even patina. 9-95097 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 155

Have a similar item you want to sell?

156

BRONZE BUDDHA.

Probably 13th century, Cambodia. Standing figure in flowing robes and princely jewels. Hands in the position of “calming the waters”. Heavily encrusted malachite patina with areas of cuprite red. SIZE: 17-1/4″. CONDITION: Top of headdress with roughness & loss on peak, old casting flaws, verdigris surfaces with overall corrosion, otherwise good. 9-95533 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 156

Have a similar item you want to sell?

157

BRONZE IMAGE.

Probably 13th century, Cambodia. Standing figure with “calming the waters” mudra. Accompanied by modern wood base. SIZE: 21-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Good verdigris surface. Small losses at bottom hem of robe. 9-95152 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 157

Have a similar item you want to sell?

158

BRONZE IMAGE OF SHIVA.

12th century style, Cambodia. Seated figure with a nagaraja halo. SIZE: 11″ h. CONDITION: Overall wear typical of age, minor casting flaws around base, foot rim and some minor horizontal cracks along base of snake. 9-95534 (800-1,200) – Lot 158

Have a similar item you want to sell?

159

BRONZE FIGURE OF A DANCING APSARA.

Previously sold at Christie’s New York, Sept. 2004, Sale No. 1409, lot 61 described as: Khmer, Bayon Style, late 12th/early 13th Century Finely cast dancing on an S-curved branch, wearing a flaring sarong and elaborate tiara, with an attractive green patina. 11 in. (28.5 cm.) high. SIZE: 11″ x 4″. PROVENANCE: Christie’s sale 1409, Lot 61. CONDITION: Broken off a larger element in antiquity. Good verdigris. 9-95448 (7,500-10,000) – Lot 159

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

160

BRONZE IMAGE.

16th century, Mongolia. Large figure of Samanta Buddha seated on an elephant. Finely cast. Traces of gold lacquer remaining. SIZE: 19-1/2″ h x 14″ w. CONDITION: Traces of gilding, dark patina. Minor corrosion and pitting. Good overall. 9-95201 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 160

Have a similar item you want to sell?

161

BRONZE STANDING FIGURE OF A DEITY.

Possibly 12th century, Cambodia. Standing image of a deity, probably Vishnu. Ornate coiffure and skirt with jeweled armlets. SIZE: 9″ h. CONDITION: Loss to one arm, both feet and loss to an object in the other hand. 9-95447 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 161

Have a similar item you want to sell?

162

BRONZE DIVINITY.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Standing image of a Buddhist Guardian with areas of parcel gilt. SIZE: 18″ h. CONDITION: Old repair to one leg. Areas of pitting, dark patina. 9-95502 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 162

Have a similar item you want to sell?

163

BRONZE VESSEL.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Archaic style kuei with mythical horned animal head handles. Surfaces decorated with tiger heads and dragon scrolling. SIZE: 13″ x 5″. CONDITION: Rough casting, dark patina. Generally good. 9-95469 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 163

Have a similar item you want to sell?

164

LACQUERED BRONZE SEATED FIGURE OF GUAN-DI.

16th/17th century, China. Seated figure of the god of war Kuan Ti in full armor seated on a throne with an incense stick holder at one side. SIZE: 13″ x 8-1/4″. CONDITION: Good color and patina. 9-95446 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 164

Have a similar item you want to sell?

165

GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF BABY BUDDHA.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Gilt figure of the infant Buddha standing on a lotus throne with lotus engraved robes. SIZE: 4-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Rubbing to the gilt. Roughness to base rim. 9-95442 (300-500) – Lot 165

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

166

BRONZE SEATED FIGURE OF BUDDHA.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Figure of Amida Buddha seated on an open lotus flower set on a throne with dharmapala guardian figures. SIZE: 13″ x 6″. CONDITION: Casting loss to the back of one throne leg. Good color with traces of gilding. 9-95420 (1,500-2,500) – Lot 166

Have a similar item you want to sell?

167

LACQUERED BRONZE SEATED FIGURE OF BUDDHA.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Depicting a seated figure of Amida Buddha. Surface lacquered red and gold. SIZE: 9-1/2″ h x 6″ w. CONDITION: Rubbing to the surface with loss. Stand a later replacement. 9-95407 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 167

Have a similar item you want to sell?

168

GILT LACQUER BRONZE FIGURE OF GUANYIN.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Seated figure of a crowned Buddha seated on a double lotus throne. Traces of gold lacquer remaining. SIZE: 11″ x 7″. CONDITION: Chips to the base. Tip losses to headdress at right ear. 9-95417 (2,000-4,000) – Lot 168

Have a similar item you want to sell?

169

BRONZE STANDING FIGURE OF WEI TUO.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Standing figure of the Buddhist guardian figure in armor holding a spear. SIZE: 13″ x 7″. CONDITION: Surface corrosion. Loss to fingertip left hand. 9-95418 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 169

Have a similar item you want to sell?

170

BRONZE FU LION FORM CENSER.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Cast in the form of a mythical animal, Luo Dan. SIZE: 13″ h x 5″ w x 5″ l. CONDITION: Chip to one ear. Losses to hinge and leg feathers (fetlock) and to tail. 9-95423 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 170

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

171

There are a couple of small areas on one vase which may have been re-glazed long ago

PAIR OF LARGE ENAMELED VASES.

Late 18th century/early 19th century, China. Cloisonne decoration of peaches and foliage on a turquoise thunder meander ground with borders of jui-i and acanthus leaves. SIZE: 22″ h x 14″ d. CONDITION: Rubbing to the gilt with some minor loss/pitting. 9-95186 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 171

Have a similar item you want to sell?

172

LARGE BLANC DE CHINE FIGURE OF QUANYIN.

18th century, China. Standing figure of the Goddess of Mercy. Signed. SIZE: 31″ h. CONDITION: Repaired finger. Stress lines through that the body, small chip to the robe and kiln flaws. Otherwise good. 9-95083 (5,000-7,000) – Lot 172

Have a similar item you want to sell?

173

LARGE SANDSTONE MALE TORSO.

China or Southeast Asia, 6-7th century style stone sculpture of Buddha with museum stand. SIZE: 31″ h overall, 26″ h of statue. CONDITION: Old loss of forearms and lower legs and head. 9-95088 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 173

Have a similar item you want to sell?

174

CARVED LIMESTONE HEAD OF BODASTAVIA.

6th century, China. SIZE: 13″ h. CONDITION: Ancient losses. 9-95035 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 174

Have a similar item you want to sell?

175

CARVED LIMESTONE HEAD OF BODASTAVIA.

6th century, China. Figure depicted with flowers in the hair. SIZE: 14″. CONDITION: Ancient losses. 9-95027 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 175

Have a similar item you want to sell?

176

CARVED LIMESTONE BUDDHA.

Probably 5 Dynasties (907-960), China. Seated figure of Amida on a draped throne. SIZE: 14″ h. CONDITION: Ancient loss to one hand. Pitted surfaces. 9-95482 (1,500-2,500) – Lot 176

Have a similar item you want to sell?

177

CARVED LIMESTONE FIGURE OF A BOHTMISAVA.

Wei Dynasty (424-532), China. Standing figure depicted holding a jewel. SIZE: 31″ x 11-1/2″. CONDITION: Old loss of right hand. Surface with normal wear and weathering. 9-94989 (20,000-25,000) – Lot 177

Have a similar item you want to sell?

178

UNUSUAL SET OF 3 GILT LACQUER STUCCO OFFICIALS.

Ming Dynasty, 17th century China. Each seated on iron base. SIZE: 24-1/2″ h. CONDITION: With typical age cracks , wear to edges, minor losses to hands. Heads slightly loose . One with large horizontal crack at knees. 9-95084, 9-95085, 9-95086 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 178

Have a similar item you want to sell?

179

BRONZE VESSEL.

Probably Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Archaic style ritual vessel form Li. Tripod base with upright handles. Surface decorated with stylized birds, cicadas and tao tieh masks. SIZE: 18″ x 12″. CONDITION: Old repaired cracks through the body. 9-95497 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 179

Have a similar item you want to sell?

180

ARCHAIC RITUAL VESSEL.

Possibly Western Chou period (1122-722 BC), China. Kuei with heavy thick malachite covered surface. SIZE: 10″ x 5-1/4″. CONDITION: Good verdigris surfaces with expected corrosion. 9-95483 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 180

Have a similar item you want to sell?

181

BRONZE COVERED WINE JAR.

Probably 18th century, China. Archaic style Lei. Surfaces decorated with bovine heads on a scrolling ground. Malachite surfaces with cuprite red. SIZE: 11″ h. CONDITION: Good verdigris surfaces with areas of corrosion. 9-95481 (300-500) – Lot 181

Have a similar item you want to sell?

182

GILT BRONZE IMAGE OF PADMAPANI.

15th Century, Nepal. Seated figure in the pose of “royal ease”. Decorated as a prince with a jeweled crown, earrings, necklace, armlets, bracelets, anklets and rings inset with semi-precious stones and glass. Mounted on a 2-part double lotus throne. SIZE: 19-1/2″ h x 15″ w. CONDITION: Part of the base possibly a later addition. Stones replaced. Casting flaws and rubbing to the gilt. Halo missing. 9-95024 (16,000-18,000) – Lot 182

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

183

COPPER ALLOY BUDDHIST IMAGE OF MAITREYA.

20th century, Sino-Tibetan. Metal image of a standing figure in princely attire with jewels of glass and semi-precious stones flanked by the wheel of law and the pure water kundika. SIZE: 17″ h. CONDITION: Spire on headdress reattached. Several cabochons missing. 9-95158 (200-300) – Lot 183

Have a similar item you want to sell?

184

HUNAMAN GILT COPPER NEPAL.

Sotheby’s New York, September 24th, 2004, Lot 74 described as follows: 18th Century. The five animal-headed and ten-armed tantric form of Hanuman holding ritual implements, supported by a reclining naked figure holding a kapala, on a lotus pedestal atop an inscribed cylindrical pole fitting. SIZE: 21-3/4″ h. PROVENANCE: Sotheby’s New York, Sept. 24, 2004, Lot 74. CONDITION: Surfaces with areas of old gilding. Structurally good. 9-95504 (8,000-12,000) – Lot 184

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

185

SILVERED COPPER ALLOY SEATED FIGURE OF KUBERA.

17th/18th century, Tibet. Seated figure of a tantric divinity with copper and gilt copper jewelry and crown with cobra around his neck and jewel encrusted eyes, possibly sapphires. SIZE: 7″ h x 5-3/4″ w. CONDITION: Snake broken, loss to objects in either hand, silver is tarnished. 9-95428 (300-500) – Lot 185

Have a similar item you want to sell?

186

SILVER AND JADE INLAY DOUBLE GOURD WALL ORNAMENT.

19th century, China or Mongolia. Double gourd mounted with repousse silver in the form of ribbons and gourd foliage. Surface inset with jades, coral, turquoise and malachite. SIZE: 12″ x 9-1/2″. CONDITION: Intact with old surfaces. Good overall. 9-95182 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 186

Have a similar item you want to sell?

187

GILT COPPER REPOUSSE PLAQUE.

17th century, Tibet. Architectural element with figures of a Buddhist divinity, horse, elephant and scrolling. SIZE: 17″ x 12-1/4″. CONDITION: With dents and weathering. 9-95165 (1,500-2,500) – Lot 187

Have a similar item you want to sell?

188

TANTRIC RITUAL VESSEL.

19th century, Tibet. Kalapa of repousse silver in the form of a skull with a flame shaped base. SIZE: 5″ l x 7″ h. CONDITION: Bent out of round. 9-95101 (600-800) – Lot 188

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

189
Revised: 3/6/2015

There are a couple of cabochons missing

LARGE SILVER AND JADE INLAID EWER.

19th century, Tibet. Repousse silver. Sides inset with white jade plaques, a white jade garment hook in the hand. With coral, lapis and turquoise inlay and jade goose finial. SIZE: 17″ h. CONDITION: One plaque damaged and repaired. Loss to inlay. 9-95103 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 189

Have a similar item you want to sell?

190

REPOUSSE FRAGMENT.

18th century or earlier, Tibet. Gilt, cold painted section of 5 heads from an image of Avalokiteshvara. Now with modern carved double lotus, fitted rosewood stand. SIZE: 10″ h. CONDITION: Losses to painted and gilt surfaces. 9-95516 (300-500) – Lot 190

Have a similar item you want to sell?

191

GILT BRONZE MODEL OF A SNOW LION.

17th/18th century, Tibet. Support piece in the figure of a dancing lion. Ungilded sections painted green and cinnabar red. Now mounted on a museum stand. SIZE: 8″ x 7-1/4″. CONDITION: Gilt surface mostly intact. Traces of old paint remaining. Very good. 9-95403 (1,500-2,500) – Lot 191

Have a similar item you want to sell?

192

GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF TSONGKHAPA & SMALL GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF DAMCHEN GARWA’I NAGPO.

Previous sold at Christie’s, New York, Sept. 2004, Sale No. 1409, lot 152 as described: Tibet, 18th/19th Century. The figure of Tsongkhapa wearing a peaked headdress and robes with incised hems flanked by his attributes of a sword and a book; the smaller figure seated side-saddle on a goat with twisted horns and mounted on a wood base. SIZE: 4-5/16″ (11.8 cm.) h and 3-1/16″ (7.8 cm.) h. PROVENANCE: Christie’s 1409, lot 152. CONDITION: Rubbing to gilt surface. Otherwise good. 9-95096, 9-95510 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 192

Have a similar item you want to sell?

193

GILT BRONZE SEATED FIGURE OF BUDDHA SHAKYAMUNI.

15th/16th century, Tibet. Gilt image of Amida Buddha in the Earth Witnessing mudra. Traces of blue pigment remain in the hair. SIZE: 6-1/2″ h x 5″ w. CONDITION: Surface with considerable rubbing and pitting. 9-95410 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 193

Have a similar item you want to sell?

194

COPPER ALLOY SEATED IMAGE OF AMITAYUS.

18th century, Tibet/Nepal. Gilt image seated in meditation. SIZE: 5″ x 3-3/4″. CONDITION: Considerable rubbing to the gilt, missing the urn in the deity’s hands. 9-95412 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 194

Have a similar item you want to sell?

195

GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF DAKINI.

20th or possibly 19th century, Tibet. Gilt bronze image of a dancing Dakini on a lotus base with a flame halo. SIZE: 10″ x 5-1/2″. CONDITION: Some rubbing to the gilt and corrosion. 9-95438 (300-500) – Lot 195

Have a similar item you want to sell?

196

POLYCHROME BRONZE FIGURE OF YAMA DHARMARAJA.

Christie’s September 2004, Sale No. 1409, Lot 134 described as: Tibet or Mongolia, circa 1800. Expressively cast with Yama standing in alidhasana over a bull and prostrated figure, wearing beaded festoons, a garland of severed heads and a billowing scarf, with wide gaping mouth and flaming hair, with Yami beside him holding a skullcup and chopper. SIZE: 8-3/4″ x 5-1/2″. PROVENANCE: Christie’s sale 1409, lot 134. CONDITION: Some corrosion. Surfaces generally good. 9-95093 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 196

Have a similar item you want to sell?

197

RARE GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF EKADSURALAKESHVARA.

17th/18th century, Tibet. Standing figure of the eleven head, thousand armed Ekadasuralakeshvara on a lotus and lion throne. Surfaces finely engraved with floral scrolling. Traces of red pigment on the throne. SIZE: 21-3/4″ h. CONDITION: Some areas of corrosion and wear to gilt. Otherwise very good. 9-95110 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 197

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

198

RARE & LARGE GILT REPOUSSE BRONZE FIGURE OF GARUDA.

Sotheby’s, New York, Sept. 24, 2004, Lot 85 described as follows: 18th Century. The mythical winged naga eater standing upright on three clawed feet with pendulous belly and arms stretched upward, hair painted green. SIZE: 17-3/4″ x 21″. PROVENANCE: Sotheby’s Sept. 24, 2004, Lot No. 85. CONDITION: Rubbing to the gilt and corrosion to the face. Otherwise good. 9-95099 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 198

Have a similar item you want to sell?

199

BRONZE FIGURE OF GANESHA.

Previously sold at Christie’s New York, Sept. 2004, Sale No. 1409, lot 56 described as: Khmer, Angkor Period, Bayon Style, late 12th/early 13th Century. Well cast seated on a shaped plinth wearing a short sampot and armlets, his face with a humorous expression and elaborate tiara, with a rich green patina overall. SIZE: 3-1/2″ h. PROVENANCE: Christie’s sale 1409, lot 56. CONDITION: Normal rubbing & losses to gold figure, otherwise very good. 9-95510-1 (5,000-7,000) – Lot 199

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

200

FOUR OFFICIALS HAT CHAIRS.

Late 19th century, China. Elmwood yoke back chairs. SIZE: 46″ h, 20-1/2″ seat height. CONDITION: Repairs to back feet. Re-polished. 9-94901, 9-94902, 9-94903, 9-94904 (1,200-1,500) – Lot 200

Have a similar item you want to sell?

201

LONG ELM ALTAR TABLE.

20th century, China. Rectangular panel top above conforming open molded frieze decorated with pierced trelliswork panels, raised on column legs. SIZE: 34″ h x 96″ l x 22″ w. CONDITION: Some shrinkage. In need of repolishing. Structurally good. 9-94961 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 201

Have a similar item you want to sell?

202

WOODEN THRONE.

19th century, China. Elmwood with carved decoration used for the display of a figure of a divinity. Traces of lacquer remaining. SIZE: 90″ h x 40″ w x 32″ d. CONDITION: Losses and damaged elements. 9-94958 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 202

Have a similar item you want to sell?

203

GILT LACQUER CARVED PALANQUIN.

19th-early 20th century, China. Surface carved with auspicious emblems and stories. Lacquered red black and gold. SIZE: 64″ h x 38″ w. CONDITION: Some losses. Otherwise good. Lacquered and gilt surfaces mostly intact. Structurally good. 9-94982 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 203

Have a similar item you want to sell?

204

PAIR OF SQUARE BACK ARMCHAIRS.

19th century. The curved crestrail joined to round stiles with shaped and molded returns centering the rectangular splat with heart shaped carving above the plank seat with inset panel flanked by shaped cylindrical arms on S-curved supports. Raised on square legs with roundel fronts, the frontal legs with shaped and molded apron above a flattened footrest all joined with box stretcher. SIZE: 35-1/2″ h overall. 20″ h of seat. 21-1/2″ w. CONDITION: Original and lacquer surface removed. Now re-polished. Structurally good. 9-94905, 9-94906 (1,200-1,500) – Lot 204

Have a similar item you want to sell?

205

WOOD BUDDHISM SHRINE.

18/19th century, China. Excellent craftsmanship, very rare. SIZE: 56-1/2″ h x 33″ d x 45″ l. CONDITION: Some cracks and discoloration due to age. 9-94955 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 205

Have a similar item you want to sell?

206

EIGHT WOODEN STANDARDS.

19th century, China. Carved wood lacquered red, black and gold with symbol of Buddhism treasure for Guardian, also symbolizes prosperity, hard wood stand, ritual instruments. Carved as stands. SIZE: 85″ x 54″. CONDITION: All in good condition, carved finials intact, some distortion and discoloration due to age. 9-94947, 9-94979; 9-94980 (800-1,200) – Lot 206

Have a similar item you want to sell?

207

PAIR OF HUANGHUALI CABINETS.

Late Qing dynasty, China. With burl wood insets carved with the hundred antiques brass mounts. Traces of lacquer in the interior. SIZE: 72″ h x 43″ w x 22″ d. CONDITION: Very good with nicely polished fronts. 9-95179 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 207

Have a similar item you want to sell?

208

RED LACQUER THRONE CHAIR.

18th century, China. Hardwood with a red lacquered surface. SIZE: 40″ h x 38″ w x 25-1/4″ d. CONDITION: Well polished. Very good. 9-95178 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 208

Have a similar item you want to sell?

209

ELMWOOD APOTHECARY CABINET.

19th century, China. Elmwood with brass mounts. Contents labeled on the front. SIZE: 57-1/2″ x 34″ x 21″. CONDITION: Overall wear showing appropriate age, some shrinkage to panels. Overall good. 9-94956 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 209

Have a similar item you want to sell?

210

EXCEPTIONAL CANED GILT AND LACQUER BED.

Late 19th Century, China. Architectural scale. Lacquer wood, open window and elaborately carved ornament on each panel, many panels, attached with 6 phoenix shaped decorative plaques. Panels caned with various scenes and landscapes. Paneled interior fitted with grass cloth woven floor and long bench fitted with storage compartments. Raised on massive “elephant” feet centering a shaped, carved and lacquered apron, etc. SIZE: 9′ h approx x 8′ 8″ w x 6′ d. CONDITION: Discoloration and chips due to age. 9-94981 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 210

Have a similar item you want to sell?

211

SET OF 6 GILT AND LACQUER WOOD DOOR PANELS.

19th c, China. 6 piece, lacquered, open window, with some sculpture wood ornaments. SIZE: 111-1/2″ h x 21″ w each. CONDITION: Age related loss of paint and chip. 9-94981-1 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 211

Have a similar item you want to sell?

212

PAIR OF HARDWOOD CARVED BASES.

20th century,with cloud pattern, could be base for stone lion. SIZE: 8″ h x 6-1/2″ w x 25″ l. CONDITION: Worn and weathered. 9-94909 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 212

Have a similar item you want to sell?

215

LARGE IVORY CARVING OF QUANYIN.

Late 19th century, China. Standing figure of the Goddess of Mercy holding a basket of lotus and a willow branch. Accompanied by fitted wood stand. Special Note: This ivory has been examined and determined to be certified to be ESA Antique Elephant (Elaphantidae) ivory. Therefore, according to U.S. Fish & Wildlife current definition of commercial saleable ivory this object complies for domestic sale. SIZE: 48″ l. CONDITION: Loss to the crown. 9-95106 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 215

Have a similar item you want to sell?

216

HOUSEHOLD BUDDHIST SHRINE.

19th century, Japan. Shrine of black and gold lacquer with engraved copper mounts. Enclosed is a triad of divinities: a Buddha and two Shinto figures in a mountain landscape, all carved, polychrome decorated and gilded and placed on an ornate throne. SIZE: 22″ h x 14″ x 9″ d. PROVENANCE: Christie’s sale 1410, lot 232. CONDITION: Losses to the hands of the divinities as well as lotus thrown & bird. Case degraded from age. 9-95517 (300-500) – Lot 216

Have a similar item you want to sell?

217

BUDDHIST SHRINE OF THE JUDGE OF HELL.

19th century, Japan. Black lacquer case with copper mounts. Gold lacquered interior with a sandalwood image with painted and gilt details. SIZE: 8-3/4″ x 5-1/4″. CONDITION: Damage to the halo, losses to the objects in the deity’s hands. 9-95090 (300-500) – Lot 217

Have a similar item you want to sell?

218

THREE BRONZE BUDDHAS.

19th century or earlier, Japan and China. Each a standing figure of the infant Buddha. SIZE: 12″ h, 7-1/2″ h, 5″ h. CONDITION: Generally good with old surfaces. 9-95443 (300-500) – Lot 218

Have a similar item you want to sell?

219

BUDDHIST IMAGE.

19th century, Japan. Fudo the immoveable of carved wood with polychrome decoration. Flame halo at the back. Mounted on a rock work plinth. SIZE: 24″ h. CONDITION: Cracks, chips and rubbing to the paint. Old repairs to flame. 9-95505 (300-500) – Lot 219

Have a similar item you want to sell?

220

BRONZE KARAKO AND DRAGON CENSER.

Meiji Period (1868-1912), Japan. Bronze oviform shape with relief decoration of dragons and clouds with supports and finial cast in the form of small children. Foundry mark on the base. SIZE: 9″ h x 7″ w. CONDITION: Fan in the child’s hand is slightly bent. Good cover and patina. 9-95441 (300-500) – Lot 220

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

221

LARGE SHRINE (ZUSHI).

Sold at Christie’s New York, Sept. 2004, Sale No. 1410, Lot 230 described as: Edo period (19th Century) The nashiji case with two doors opening to reveal a multi-armed Boddhisattva seated on a lotus flower above rolling waves, the mandorla behind him decorated with flames and Sanskrit letters, the waves beneath pierced with painted metal lotus blossoms and leaves, interior gold and the insides of the doors painted with the Bodhisattvas Fugen and Monju on their respective mounts, the pediment across the top painted with confronted phoenixes and clouds; hardware carved with scrolling vines and flowers SIZE: 16-1/2″ x 13″ x 5″. CONDITION: Some rubbing to painted surfaces and gilt, flowers generally intact. 9-95518 (1,500-2,000) – Lot 221

Have a similar item you want to sell?

222

LACQUERED WOOD SHRINE OF MAITREYA.

18th/19th century, Japan. Russet lacquer case with brass mounts enclosing a black and gold lacquered image in contemplation with four arms holding various attributes seated on an ornate throne with a cloud halo at the back. SIZE: 25″ h x 14″ w x 10-1/4″ d. CONDITION: Loss to objects in the hands and rubbing to the lacquer. Otherwise good. 9-95092 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 222

Have a similar item you want to sell?

223

GILT BRONZE HORSE PAPERWEIGHT.

18th century, China. Study of a grooming horse with heavy gilt surface. SIZE: 2-1/2″ x 2-1/2″. CONDITION: Rubbing, otherwise very good. 9-95409 (300-500) – Lot 223

Have a similar item you want to sell?

224

GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF AMITAYUS.

18th century, China. Depicting a seated figure of Amitayus on a throne with a gilded surface. SIZE: 8″ h x 4-1/2″ w. CONDITION: Missing vase in the figure’s hands, halo at the back absent and considerable rubbing to the gilt. 9-95406 (1,500-2,000) – Lot 224

Have a similar item you want to sell?

225

BRONZE TAOIST IMMORTAL AND DRAGON CARP.

17th/18th century, China. Taoist immortal holding a double gourd astride the back of mythical animal rising above the waves. Doubles as incense holder. SIZE: 11-1/2″ h x 6-1/4″ w. CONDITION: Replaced dedication plaque and new screw holding the figure and the base together. Otherwise good. 9-95405 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 225

Have a similar item you want to sell?

226

THREE PARCEL GILT BRONZE FIGURES.

18th/19th century, China. Set of three Taoist divinities including a central bearded deity with two flanking attendants. SIZE: Each about 4″ h. CONDITION: Rubbing to the gilt. Replaced wooded bases. Objects missing from the hands. 9-95166 (300-500) – Lot 226

Have a similar item you want to sell?

227

GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF A FEMALE ATTENDANT.

19th century or earlier, China. Standing figure in court costume holding a round covered box. SIZE: 9-1/4″ h. CONDITION: Abraded surfaces worn down the bronze below the gilt. 9-95411 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 227

Have a similar item you want to sell?

228

FOUR SMALL BRONZE DEITIES.

Three Chinese bronzes, Ming Period (1368-1644) including two Buddhist figures and a figure of the immortal Liu Hai. Together with a tantric image of a many armed and headed figure seated on the back of a lion. SIZE: Tallest: 5-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Generally good with old surfaces. 9-95408 (300-500) – Lot 228

Have a similar item you want to sell?

229

JADE CARVING OF A PAIR OF MONKEYS.

19th century, China. Gray and white stone. Figures carved with a bough of peaches. SIZE: 2″ l. CONDITION: Flea bite to tip of sprig. 9-95374 (300-500) – Lot 229

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

230

EIGHT JADES.

20th century, China. Includes a frog, a bear, a kylin, a model of a writing brush, a loom, an archaic disk, a pig and a double gourd. SIZE: Largest: 4″. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95384 (300-500) – Lot 230

Have a similar item you want to sell?

231

EIGHT JADES.

19th and 20th centuries, China. Includes a dragon and phoenix groups, a kylin, a bird, a pair of birds, pea pods, a tiger and two human figures. SIZE: 4″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95387 (300-500) – Lot 231

Have a similar item you want to sell?

232

THREE JADES.

19th century, China. Includes a cylinder carved with a tao tieh mask, a pi disk and a much calcified pig. SIZE: Largest 5″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95392 (300-500) – Lot 232

Have a similar item you want to sell?

233
Revised: 3/11/2015

Please Note: A small section at the top has been glued at some point in time.

CARVED JADE MOUNTAIN IN THREE PARTS.

20th century, China. Vivid variegated green stone carved in deep relief depicting a lush mountain our landscape with waterfall, conifers, Bamboo, exotic birds, deer, etc. SIZE: Approximately 40″ h, including stand. CONDITION: Very good with minimal roughness and chips to some leap tips. 9-95151 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 233

Have a similar item you want to sell?

234

JADE BIRD.

Ming Period or earlier, China. Carving in the form of an owl. Stone of a gray green color with one side considerably calcified. With holes for suspension pierced at the back of the neck. SIZE: 2″ l. CONDITION: Very good. 9-95401 (300-500) – Lot 234

Have a similar item you want to sell?

235

CARVED JADE STUDY OF A HORSE AND FOAL.

Probably early 20th century, China. Stone of a uniform celadon green color. SIZE: 7-1/2″ x 6-1/4″. CONDITION: Natural lines & fissures. 9-95196 (1,500-2,000) – Lot 235

Have a similar item you want to sell?

236

CARVED JADE STUDY OF TWO QUAIL.

19th, early 20th century, China. Greenish white stone with amber markings. Quail with a branch of millet. SIZE: 5-1/2″ x 4-1/2″. CONDITION: Natural fissures & inclusions. 9-95170 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 236

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

237

GREY LIMESTONE STANDING FIGURE OF BUDDHA.

Possibly 6/7th century, China. High density stone Buddha sculpture. SIZE: Approximately 36″ h. CONDITION: Missing both hands and lower legs at knee. 9-95031 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 237

Have a similar item you want to sell?

238

SEATED STONE BUDDHA.

Wei Dynasty, China. Marble seated figure of Amida Buddha, possibly of the period. SIZE: 34″. CONDITION: Loss to both arms and cracks to the body. Otherwise good with normal weathering to surface. 9-95043 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 238

Have a similar item you want to sell?

239

BRONZE BUDDHA.

18th century, Burma. Seated figure in the earth witnessing mudra. Extensive inscription at the base. SIZE: 34″ h. CONDITION: Good surface and patination. 9-95162 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 239

Have a similar item you want to sell?

240
Revised: 3/22/2015

Please Note: Previously sold at Sotheby’s September 24th, 2004, Lot 75. Also Please Note: This head is similar to another head of Bhairava in the Zimmerman Collection; see Pal, 1975, p. 100, no. 67. Also compare with Sotheby’s New York, September 16, 1998, lot 74 and Sotheby’s New York, March 24, 2004, lot 91.

GILT REPOUSSE BRONZE MASK OF BHAIRAVA.

16th century, Nepal. Image with colored details. SIZE: 33″ x 35″. CONDITION: Rubbing to gilt. 9-95091 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 240

Have a similar item you want to sell?

241

PARCEL GILT LACQUER SEATED BUDDHA.

18th century, Burma. Image of the Buddha seated with hands in the earth witnessing mudra. Finely engraved decoration with an inscription at the back. SIZE: 18″ x 11-1/4″. CONDITION: Considerable rubbing to the gilt, otherwise very good. 9-95033 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 241

Have a similar item you want to sell?

242

PARCEL GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF MAHAKALA.

20th century, Tibet. Parcel gilt bronze figure of a standing Yama with cold gold paste and pigments on the face. SIZE: 9-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Very good. 9-95161 (300-500) – Lot 242

Have a similar item you want to sell?

243

SMALL GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF A WRATHFUL PROTECTOR.

Previously sold at Christie’s New York, Sept. 2004, Sale No. 1409, lot 133 described as: Tibet, 14th Century. The three-headed deity trampling in alidhasana with his six arms radiating around him, wearing a tiger skin dhoti and a snake garland, his faces with ferocious expressions and foliate tiara, richly gilt overall. 4 in. (10 cm.) high. SIZE: 4″ x 4″. PROVENANCE: Christie’s sale 1409, Lot 133. CONDITION: Minor surface rubbing, otherwise very good. One or more elements in hand missing. 9-95167 (2,500-3,500) – Lot 243

Have a similar item you want to sell?

244

REPOUSSE GILT METAL PRAYER BOX.

20th century, Tibet or Bhutan. Metal cover with filigree inset with corals and turquoise. Enclosed pages from an illuminated text. SIZE: 14″ x 4″. CONDITION: Cabochons intact. Soiled surfaces. Interior paintings intact. 9-95123 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 244

Have a similar item you want to sell?

245

JADE MOUNTAIN.

Early 20th century, China. Large jade boulder of celadon green color with an amber skin. Deeply carved with the approaches and interior of a tamale with the main shrine enclosing an image of the Buddha. Finely carved hardwood base decorated with waves and clouds. SIZE: 25″ x 14″. CONDITION: Deeply carved. High relief. Very good. Carved base with small losses. 9-94973 (16,000-18,000) – Lot 245

Have a similar item you want to sell?

246

PRAJNAPARAMITA SUTRA: “THE PERFECTION OF WISDOM IN 100,000 VERSES”.

Previously sold at Christie’s New York, Sale 1409, Sept. 23, 2004, Lot 101 described as follows: Circa 15th century, Tibet. Each sheet of 8 lines in Tibetan dbu can script using silver ink with rubrics in gold ink on both sides; the introductory leaves with protective flyleaf and a leaf with upper cover containing writing in 8 lines that is a flap below which is an ornate title in gold characters filling the entire area in one line (with another leaf attached perhaps subsequently for strength); attached to the title leaf is a silk stub once serving as an identifying tag hanging out of a library shelf; the wooden cover depicting the Five Tathagathas in recessed aureoles surrounded by scrollwork, beaded and stylized flame borders. This book contains the first three sections, probably 10,000 lines or verses, from the Perfecton of Wisdom in 100,000 verses. This is a Buddhist sutra text which has been expanded to an enormous extent by the addition of scholarly commentary and devotional exercises. The Perfection of Wisdom is the central canonical text of the Mahayana Prajnaparamita school. Modern scholarship considers that the text was elaborated by a series of additions to a small original core over the period from 50 to 700 AD. SIZE: 27-3/4″ x 10-1/4″ x 4-1/2″. PROVENANCE: Christie’s New York, Sale 1409, Sept. 24, 2004, Lot 101. CONDITION: Wear to the edges consistent with age. 9-95187 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 246

Have a similar item you want to sell?

247

COPPER, ALLOY HEAD OF AVALOKITESHVARA.

19th/20th century, Tibet or Nepal. Crowned head of Avalokiteshvara. Areas of inlay of turquoise and coral. SIZE: 17″ h. CONDITION: Surface rubbed. Inlays and cabochons intact. Otherwise good. 9-95127 (800-1,200) – Lot 247

Have a similar item you want to sell?

248

BLACK LACQUER KIMONO RACK.

18th century, Japan. Surface decoration with brown lacquer and foliation with heraldic emblems. Engraved gilt metal mounts. SIZE: 75″ x 64″ x 17″. CONDITION: Some wear to black lacquer age cracks minor rubbing, loose joints. 9-95052 (200-400) – Lot 248

Have a similar item you want to sell?

249

RATAN RED LACQUER LOW LEG TABLE.

20th century, Japan. With lacquered frame and rateng. SIZE: 12″ h x 72-1/2″ d x 119-1/2″ l. CONDITION: Good, some discoloration due to age. 9-95058 (800-1,200) – Lot 249

Have a similar item you want to sell?

250

LACQUERED SHRINE.

19th century, Japan. The black lacquered cabinet with bi-fold doors opening to latticework bi-fold wire doors beneath a gilt foliate carved filigree opening to a galleried interior, gold gilt with compartments. SIZE: 35-1/2″ h x 18-1/2″ w x 15″ d. CONDITION: Very good with intact surfaces. 9-95519 (300-500) – Lot 250

Have a similar item you want to sell?

251

DATED GILT IRON FIGURE OF A SEATED TAOIST IMMORTAL.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Dated to the Wan Li reign (1573-1619) in an extensive inscription. SIZE: 22″ h x 13-1/2″. CONDITION: Very good, missing element in hands. 9-95506 (10,000-15,000) – Lot 251

Have a similar item you want to sell?

252

SIGNED (Japan, 20th Century) BUTTERFLY ON SPRING BOUGH.

Oil on canvas Housed in wood stylized bamboo frame Indistinctly signed lower left SIZE: 47″ x 60″. Overall 47-1/4″ x 60-1/4″ CONDITION: Good 9-95046 (100-200) – Lot 252

Have a similar item you want to sell?

253

POTTERY FLYING HORSE.

China. Tang style fancifully posed prancing horse with bobbed mane and tail and open mouth. SIZE: 43″ h x 50″ l (statue only) CONDITION: Very good. Ornament on back of neck may have been set in groove. Most of paint loss. 9-95068 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 253

Have a similar item you want to sell?

254

CARVED STONE STELE.

Sui Dynasty (589-618), China. Central figure of Amida with two flanking attendants. Flame aureole at the top. Stand not included. SIZE: 36″ x 19″. CONDITION: Multiple old losses throughout. Weathered surface. 9-95073 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 254

Have a similar item you want to sell?

255

CARVED LIMESTONE IMAGE.

Wei Dynasty (424-532), China. Standing figure of a Bodhisattva in princely attire. Stand not included. SIZE: 32″ h. CONDITION: Normal weathering to surface. Losses to both arms and left side. 9-95042 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 255

Have a similar item you want to sell?

256

STONE CARVED LINGA.

19th century or earlier, Japanese style. Cylinder with dome top on octagonal section on square section. SIZE: 36″ h. CONDITION: Good. 9-94993 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 256

Have a similar item you want to sell?

257

MING LIMESTONE HEAD.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Head of the Boddhisatva Avalokiteshvara. Now mounted on museum stand. SIZE: 13″. CONDITION: Old chips. Otherwise good. 9-95503 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 257

Have a similar item you want to sell?

258

FINELY CAST BRONZE MODEL OF A FOO LION AND CUB.

17th/18th century, China. Cast in the form of a Buddhist lion playing with a brocade ball. SIZE: 19″ x 17″. CONDITION: Undisturbed surface with good patina. 9-95477 (10,000-15,000) – Lot 258

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

259

LARGE BRONZE MING IMAGE OF AMIDA BUDDHA.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Figure standing on lotus throne. Robes with engraved details. SIZE: 25″ h. CONDITION: Nice surface, some wear, very good. 9-95156 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 259

Have a similar item you want to sell?

260

GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF INFANT BUDDHA.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Standing image of the infant Buddha in dragon embroidered robe. Sotheby’s, New York, Sept. 22, 2004 Lot 46, described as follows: The divine child standing with both index fingers on long arms pointing in opposing directions towards Heaven and Earth, naked but for an apron cast with a large writing dragon chasing a ‘flaming’ pearl, secured above his large rump by tied ribbons, his large bald head set with wide open eyes and impish smile. Notes: Depictions of Sakyamuni as a child, pointing to the sky with his left index finger and to the ground with his right, do not yet show the usnisa, the protruberance of the skull, which is perhaps the most important of the thirty-two outward signs of a Buddha, since this is considered the one that was acquired last. A similar figure wearing a flower-decorated apron in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, is illustrated in Ren?Yvon Lefebvre d’Argenc? Chinese, Korean and Japanese Sculpture in the Avery Brundage Collection, San Francisco, 1974, pl.185, where the textual origin of the iconography, related to the first Seven Steps of Buddha Sakyamuni, is discussed. SIZE: 9″ h. PROVENANCE: Sotheby’s New York, Sept. 22, 2004 Lot 46. CONDITION: Rubbing to the gilt. 9-95100 (8,000-12,000) – Lot 260

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

261

HU FORM BRONZE WINE JAR.

Sung to Ming Period, China. Surface decorated with a bovine projection and tao tieh mask handles. Body inlaid with gold and silver with pi disks, chevrons and a band of scrolling demons. Archaic inscription in the base. SIZE: 12″ x 8-1/2″. CONDITION: Shows wear & tarnish, some scuff marks. 9-95189 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 261

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

262

PARCEL GILT BRONZE BUDDHA.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Figure of Avalokiteshvara in princely jewels seated on a four tiered lotus throne. Figure with a parcel gilt surface. Throne red and gold lacquered. SIZE: 20″ x 13″. CONDITION: Casting flaws. Wear to painted surfaces of base. 9-95037 (5,000-7,000) – Lot 262

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

263

GILT BRONZE STANDING FIGURE OF MANJUSHRI.

Probably Nepal, 17th C or earlier. Robed figure of Manjushri with headdress on plinth. SIZE: Statue: 13-1/2″ h. Overall: 17-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Wear to gilded surfaces, otherwise very good. 9-95105 (20,000-30,000) – Lot 263

Click here to view rotating image

Have a similar item you want to sell?

264

SILVER & HARDSTONE INLAID COVERED BOX.

20th century, Tibet or Bhutan. Burlwood inset with brass, silver, coral and turquoise. SIZE: 6″ dia. CONDITION: Discolor surface, wire banding on lid loose, a few minor cracks. 9-95124 (200-300) – Lot 264

Have a similar item you want to sell?

265

SILVER BUDDHIST WINE EWER.

19th century, Tibet or Mongolia. Repousse silver with reserves of the wheel of law and the eight precious emblems on a floral ground. Makala mask spout and dragon shaped hand. Flame finial. Surface inlaid with turquoise and coral cabochons. SIZE: 19″ h x 10-1/2″ w. CONDITION: Missing cabochons, otherwise good. 9-95436 (300-500) – Lot 265

Have a similar item you want to sell?

266

GILT BRONZE RITUAL DAGGER.

18th/19th century, Tibet. Makala headed triangular blade vajra hilt with Hayagriva finial. SIZE: 14-1/2″ l. CONDITION: Generally good. 9-95119 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 266

Have a similar item you want to sell?

267

THREE BRONZES.

Early 20th century, Himalayan Region. Includes a bronze bell, a seated female figure and a bronze tiger with gold inlaid eyes. SIZE: 9″, 4-1/2″ and 11″, respectively. CONDITION: Generally good with old surfaces. 9-95450 (300-500) – Lot 267

Have a similar item you want to sell?

268

GILT BRONZE FIGURE OF DAKINI.

20th century, Tibet. Gilt bronze image of Dakini with cold gold paste and pigments on the head. Inlays of coral and turquoise. SIZE: 10-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Very good with vibrant color. 9-95444 (300-500) – Lot 268

Have a similar item you want to sell?

269

TWO CARVED WOODEN BUDDHIST FIGURES.

19th century, China. Figures of Luohans of joined construction and glass inlaid eyes. Wooden surfaces with traces of the original paint. SIZE: Each about 22″ h. CONDITION: Cracks, loose elements and repairs. Loss to fingertips and lower lip on one figure. Painted surfaces removed. 9-95522 (300-500) – Lot 269

Have a similar item you want to sell?

270

BRONZE BEAKER.

Probably Chou Period (1122-249 BC). Decoration of Tao Tieh masks and cicada motifs. Encrusted surface with cuprite, malachite and azurite. SIZE: 11″ h x 6-1/4″ d. CONDITION: Verdigris surface with overall corrosion. 9-95190 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 270

Have a similar item you want to sell?

271
Revised: 3/6/2015

There is loss to the end of one drape on the robe on the proper left side

GILT BRONZE IMAGE OF GUANYIN OR AVALOKITESHVARA.

Probably Tang Dynasty, China. Figure of a seated figure in princely jewels and robes. SIZE: 4-1/4″ h. CONDITION: Loss to one arms, rubbing to the gilt. 9-95118 (1,200-1,500) – Lot 271

Have a similar item you want to sell?

272

BRONZE TAOIST VASE.

17th/18th century, China. Moon flask shape with a garlic mouth and animal mask handles. Body decorated with the Yin Yang emblem and the eight trigrams. SIZE: 11-1/2″. CONDITION: Very good with old surface. 9-95422 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 272

Have a similar item you want to sell?

273

BRONZE SEATED FIGURE OF BUDDHA.

17th century, Berma. Seated figure of Amida in the earth witnessing mudra. Open work scrolling throne. High tin content metal. Traces of gold leaf remaining. SIZE: 13″ x 8-1/2″ x 7″. CONDITION: Areas of verdigris. Some old damages to bottom of platform. 9-95424 (300-500) – Lot 273

Have a similar item you want to sell?

274

PARCEL GILT BRONZE HORSE FORM CENSER.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Cast in the form of a caparisoned horse. Lid a later replacement. SIZE: 6″ h x 8-1/2″ l. CONDITION: Rubbing to the gilt. 9-95194 (600-800) – Lot 274

Have a similar item you want to sell?

275

KU FORM JADE VASE.

19th-early 20th century, China. Four sided diamond shaped with foliated leaves and a wavy edge. Central section with chih lung carved in high relief. Stone of a highly translucent celadon green color with russet markings. SIZE: 7-3/4″ x 4-3/4″. CONDITION: Very good. 9-95463 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 275

Have a similar item you want to sell?

276
Revised: 3/8/2015

Please Note: There is an ancient casting flaw noted at the top of the headdress.

MING CAST IRON HEAD OF QUANYIN.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Image of the Goddess of Mercy in a flowered headdress with an ornate chignon. Accompanied by museum stand. SIZE: 16″ h. CONDITION: Rusted surface with some flaking. 9-95112 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 276

Have a similar item you want to sell?

277

SEATED FIGURE OF MANJUSHRI.

19th century or earlier, China. SIZE: 7″ h. CONDITION: Loss to objects in the hands, lotus on left shoulder, and the inlaid jewels. 9-95116 (400-600) – Lot 277

Have a similar item you want to sell?

278

BRONZE BIXI MIRROR STAND.

Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), China. Single horned mythical animal with a crescent moon rising from clouds. SIZE: 10-1/2″ x 6″. CONDITION: Dark patina with areas of rubbing. Casting cracks and repair to tail. 9-95509 (300-500) – Lot 278

Have a similar item you want to sell?

279

MING CLOISONNE CENSER.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Square form with a flaring mouth and elephant head feet. Body decorated in cloisonné enamels with a decoration of chih lung and flower on a blue and turquoise background. SIZE: 4-1/4″ x 4-1/4″ x 4″ h. CONDITION: Rough around the edges at the top with enamel loss. 9-95440 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 279

Have a similar item you want to sell?

280

PAIR OF LARGE SCREENS.

First half of the 20th century, China. Panels of translucent spinach green jade carved with figures of the immortals in a landscape. Reverse with Ch’ien Lung inscriptions of seal characters engraved and colored gold. Rosewood frames carved and pierced with Archaic scrolling and inlaid with the eight precious symbols in silver. SIZE: 43″ h x 29″ w. CONDITION: Very good. 9-95157 (10,000-15,000) – Lot 280

Have a similar item you want to sell?

281

RARE AND IMPRESSIVE LACQUER WOOD SEATED FIGURE OF AVALOKITESHVARA.

Ming Dynasty period, China, wood carved and lacquered Guanyin sculpture. Polychrome painted. SIZE: 37″ h x 29″ w. CONDITION: Considerable weathering and loss to painted surface due to age. Structurally good. 9-95059 (15,000-25,000) – Lot 281

Have a similar item you want to sell?

282

JADE CARVING OF A TAOIST DEITY.

Early 20th century, China. Figure in Ming style court costume. Uniform gray stone. SIZE: 7″. CONDITION: Very good. 9-95200 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 282

Have a similar item you want to sell?

283

LARGE JADE FOO LION FORMED PILLOW.

Probably early 20th century, China. Gray-green celadon color stone. Carved in the round as a Buddhist lion dog. SIZE: 12″ l. CONDITION: Natural fissures & hairlines with inclusions. 9-95175 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 283

Have a similar item you want to sell?

284

BRONZE NODDING HEAD MONK LAMP.

19th century, Mongolia. Enthroned seated figure of a monk with a nodding head holding a prayer wheel. SIZE: 8-1/2 x 7″. CONDITION: Heavily rubbed surface and cracks and dents. 9-95508 (300-500) – Lot 284

Have a similar item you want to sell?

285

BRONZE FIGURE OF A SEATED LAMA.

19th/20th Century, Tibet. Seated image of a high lama with engraved details of embroidery. SIZE: 6″ l x 4-1/4″ w. CONDITION: Good with fine, even patina. Roughness to bottom of plinth. 9-95117 (600-800) – Lot 285

Have a similar item you want to sell?

286
Revised: 3/6/2015

There is a very small, old separation at the shoulder

SILVER AND JADE INLAID EWER.

19th century, Tibet. Pitcher with repousse silver lotus scrolling. Surface inlaid with a jade plaque carved with chi lung and coral and turquoise. Handle worked as a dragon in the round. SIZE: 12″ x 7″. CONDITION: Small number of cabochons missing, otherwise good. 9-95104 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 286

Have a similar item you want to sell?

287

SILVERED COPPER ALLOY FIGURE OF KUBERA.

19th/20th century, Tibet. Seated figure in base silver, copper and gilt. SIZE: 7″ h. CONDITION: Loss to an area of the crown. Otherwise good. 9-95113 (1,200-1,400) – Lot 287

Have a similar item you want to sell?

288

THANGKA OF SHAKYAMUNI.

Tibet, 19/20th c. Distemper on cloth, the large thangka depicts Shakyamuni Buddha in the center, complete with box. SIZE: 61″ h x 48″ w CONDITION: Age related wear. 9-95525 (300-500) – Lot 288

Have a similar item you want to sell?

289

PAIR OF SILVER MYTHICAL BEAST FORM CENSERS.

Early 20th century, Tibet or Mongolia. Repousse silver in the shape of winged horned mythical animals. Surface inlay with malachite, coral and turquoise cabochons. SIZE: 7″ h x 4-1/2″ l. CONDITION: Loss to inlaid cabochons, otherwise structurally good. 9-95435 (600-800) – Lot 289

Have a similar item you want to sell?

290

PAIR OF SILVER TURTLE FORM EWERS.

Early 20th century, Tibet or Mongolia. Tortoise shaped repousse silver inset with cabochons of malachite and coral. SIZE: 9″ l x 5-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Some inlays missing. Structurally good. 9-95434 (600-800) – Lot 290

Have a similar item you want to sell?

291

PAIR OF SILVER ARCHAISTIC BIRDS.

Early 20th century, Tibet or Mongolia. Silver repousse with detachable covers. Surface inlaid with cabochons of coral and turquoise. SIZE: 9-1/4″ x 5-1/2″ l. CONDITION: Two inlays missing and replaced cabochons. 9-95433 (600-800) – Lot 291

Have a similar item you want to sell?

292

SILVER MOUNTED CONCH TRUMPET.

19th/20th century, Tibet. Surface carved with 5 Buddhas in relief. Repousse silver mounts inset with turquoise cabochons. SIZE: 8-1/2″ l. CONDITION: Damage to the mouth piece of the instrument. 9-95120 (600-800) – Lot 292

Have a similar item you want to sell?

293

SILVER TANTRIC RITUAL VESSEL.

19th century, Tibet. Kalapa of repousse silver of floral scrolling inset with carnelian, lapis lazuli, coral and turquoise. SIZE: 7-3/4″ h x 4-3/4″ l. CONDITION: Losses to inlay, tarnished surface. 9-95102 (600-800) – Lot 293

Have a similar item you want to sell?

294
Revised: 3/6/2015

There are a couple of small cabochons missing

SILVER AND JADE INLAID WINE EWER.

20th century, Tibet or Mongolia. Repousse base silver inlaid with cabochons of coral and turquoise and inset with a jade garment hook in the handle and two jade plaques in the body and a jade goose finial. SIZE: 16-3/4″ h x 10″. CONDITION: Crack to spout. Generally soiled surfaces. 9-95437 (300-500) – Lot 294

Have a similar item you want to sell?

295

COVERED BOTTLE.

20th century, Tibet or Bhutan. Composite material inlaid with silver, coral and turquoise. SIZE: 14″ h. CONDITION: Shows wear, wire to rim loose, scratch to body on one side. 9-95126 (300-500) – Lot 295

Have a similar item you want to sell?

296

PAIR OF COPPER ALLOY PEN CASES.

19th/20th century, Tibet or Bhutan. Hammered copper inset with coins and inscriptions. SIZE: 10-1/2″ and 9″. CONDITION: Some dents & rub losses, generally good. 9-95122 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 296

Have a similar item you want to sell?

297

SILVER BUDDHIST PORTABLE SHRINE BOX.

20th century, Bhutan. Cruciform with a vajra at the top. Silver filigree inset with lapis, turquoise, carnelian and glass in the shape of Buddhist divinities. SIZE: 4″ x 3″. CONDITION: Hardstone intact, filigree silver intact, overall very good condition. One coral stone detached but present. 9-95488 (300-500) – Lot 297

Have a similar item you want to sell?

298

COPPER AND HARDSTONE INLAID BUDDHIST COFFER.

20th century, Bhutan. Surface inlaid with turquoise, coral, amber, Buddha figures, vajras and Buddhist inscriptions. SIZE: 16″ w x 9-1/4″ d x 13″ h. CONDITION: One handle absent, otherwise intact and good. Shows normal and expected wear. 9-95155 (400-600) – Lot 298

Have a similar item you want to sell?

299

LACQUER WOOD SEATED FIGURE OF AVALOKITESHVARA.

19th century or earlier with earlier elements, China. Seated figure of the water moon viewing Avalokiteshvara. Traces of pigment adhering. SIZE: 45″ x 28″. CONDITION: Weathered surfaces. 9-95495 (6,000-8,000) – Lot 299

Have a similar item you want to sell?

300

LARGE BRONZE CENSER.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Archaic kuei form with animal mask handles. Body covered in bosses. SIZE: 21″ dia x 8″. CONDITION: Well cast surfaces with verdigris and undisturbed patina. Normal and expected corrosion. 9-95498 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 300

Have a similar item you want to sell?

301

MING BRONZE FIGURE OF A ZHENWU WARRIOR.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Seated figure of a Taoist divinity in armor. SIZE: 11″ x 6″. CONDITION: Losses to rear feet of throne. 9-95419 (300-500) – Lot 301

Have a similar item you want to sell?

302

BRONZE SEATED FIGURE OF BUDDHA SHAKYAMUNI.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Seated figure of the Medicine Buddha. Robes engraved with lotus flowers and floral scrolling. SIZE: 11″ x 7″. CONDITION: Roughness along base, general corrosion on surface. 9-95416 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 302

Have a similar item you want to sell?

303

BRONZE DEITY.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Standing figure in court attire holding a lotus flower. Traces of gold lacquer on the surface. SIZE: 32″ h. CONDITION: Possible old repairs back of base, otherwise good. 9-95507 (2,000-4,000) – Lot 303

Have a similar item you want to sell?

305

JADE HORSE.

Ming style, China. Carving of a grazing horse with a monkey on its back symbolizing the rhebus “to become a high official instantly” in gray jade with russet areas. SIZE: 4″ x 2-1/2″. CONDITION: Very good with no evident damage. 9-95395 (800-1,200) – Lot 305

Have a similar item you want to sell?

306

JADE CARVING OF A BIXIE/PI HSIEH.

Ming Period (1368-1644) or earlier, China. Pi Hsieh (“warding off evil”) recumbent figure with a single horn. Stone of a grey color with large areas of russet and a shoulder of creamy white. SIZE: 5-1/4″ l x 3-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Very good with natural fissures. 9-95393 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 306

Have a similar item you want to sell?

307

LARGE JADE BASIN.

Early 20th century, China. Oval form. Surface carved with demon masks and swirling dragons and clouds. Stone of a sea green color with areas of gray. SIZE: 17″ x 12″ x 6″. CONDITION: With natural fissures. Very good. 9-95153 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 307

Have a similar item you want to sell?

309

GILT LACQUER WOOD IMAGE OF A LUOHAN.

19th century, China. Figure in seated position. Surface of a gold lacquer. Stand not included. SIZE: 32″. CONDITION: Structurally good with some losses to gilt surface. 9-95473 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 309

Have a similar item you want to sell?

310

TWO CARVED WOODEN GUARDIAN FIGURES.

19th century, China. Seated figures with multiple arms in full armor. Surface lacquered black and gold. Stands not included. SIZE: 45″ h each. CONDITION: Cracks, surface loss; loss to objects in hands. 9-95072, 95087 (10,000-20,000) – Lot 310

Have a similar item you want to sell?

311

CARVED AND LACQUERED SEATED FIGURE OF AVALOKITESHVARA.

19th century or earlier. Seated in lotus position with two hands in prayer, another two hands holding objects, twenty-two arms flanking the side with green and red lacquer throughout. SIZE: 27″ h x 39″ w. CONDITION: Some overall wear with minor losses and damage. Some arms with restoration. 9-95070 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 311

Have a similar item you want to sell?

312

LARGE SANDSTONE HEAD OF BUDDHA.

15th century, Thailand. Gray sandstone head of the Buddha. Mounted on square pedestal. SIZE: 15″ h. CONDITION: Loss of ornament on top of head. 9-95535 (500-700) – Lot 312

Have a similar item you want to sell?

313

POTTERY CAMEL.

Possibly T’ang period (618-920). Reclining figure in gray pottery. SIZE: 17″ x 15″. CONDITION: Tail detached with some pieces present, chipping to some areas revealing surfaces underneath. 9-95044 (1,000-1,200) – Lot 313

Have a similar item you want to sell?

314

POTTERY HORSE.

Possibly T’ang period (618-920). Standing caparisoned figure with traces of pigments remaining. SIZE: 23″ x 17″. CONDITION: Reglued elements & some detached, missing ear tip. 9-95045 (2,000-2,500) – Lot 314

Have a similar item you want to sell?

315

STUCCO FIGURE OF DEITY.

Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Seated figure in court attire painted in reds and gold. SIZE: 40″ l x 17″ w. CONDITION: Surface loss. 9-95089 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 315

Have a similar item you want to sell?

316

LIMESTONE SEATED FIGURE OF VISHNU.

19th century or earlier. Depicted with halo of ducks. Stand not included. SIZE: 30″ h. CONDITION: Old losses to top of halo and to hands. 9-95074 (8,000-10,000) – Lot 316

Have a similar item you want to sell?

317

BRONZE STANDING FIGURE OF BODHIDHARMA.

Yuan to Ming Dynasty, China. Standing image of Bodhidharma. Accompanied by a later burl wood stand. SIZE: 10″ h. PROVENANCE: Sotheby’s New York, Lot 55. CONDITION: Figure and root stand each very good. 9-95098 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 317

Have a similar item you want to sell?

318

ROSEWOOD FIGURE OF SEATED LOUHAN.

19th/20th century, China. Rosewood carving of a Buddhist saint reading sutras accompanied by a tiger. SIZE: 8″ x 6″. CONDITION: Cracks to body, tiger missing inlays to the mouth, right eye missing, typical age cracks. 9-95129 (200-300) – Lot 318

Have a similar item you want to sell?

319

GILT LACQUER WOOD FIGURAL GROUP.

19th century, China. Historical scene of two figures in armor. Surface lacquered in red and gold. SIZE: 33″ h. CONDITION: Cracks to the wood with good worn gilt surface. 9-95541 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 319

Have a similar item you want to sell?

320

CARVED WOODEN HEAD OF LUOHAN.

Probably Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Mounted on a modern plinth. SIZE: 14″ h. CONDITION: Age cracks and weathering. Otherwise good. 9-95490 (400-600) – Lot 320

Have a similar item you want to sell?

321

LACQUERED WOOD FIGURE OF KUAN TI.

18th/19th century, China. Step figure of the god of war. Surface lacquered in red and gold. SIZE: 11-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Chip to the headdress, otherwise good. 9-95114 (500-700) – Lot 321

Have a similar item you want to sell?

322
Revised: 3/8/2015

Please Note: There is an additional old age crack in the neck region.

ROSEWOOD FIGURE OF LOUHAN.

18th/19th century, China. Rosewood figure of an emaciated aesthetic reading sutras and holding a rosary. SIZE: 9″ h. CONDITION: Right arm with restoration, age crack to right leg. 9-95131 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 322

Have a similar item you want to sell?

323

NANCY CHU WOO (Chinese, 1941-) “THREE GRACES”.

Acrylic on canvas Unframed Signed lower left Note: Ms. Woo has had exhibitions at several museums including the Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai, China SIZE: 50-1/2″ x 49″ CONDITION: Good 9-94933 (6,000-9,000) – Lot 323

Have a similar item you want to sell?

324

NANCY CHU WOO (Chinese/American, 1941-) ABSTRACT.

Ink on paper Unframed Signed lower right in script having calligraphy lower left Note: Ms. Woo has had exhibitions at several museums including the Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai, China SIZE: Image: 36-1/2″ x 30-1/2″; Overall: 43-1/2″ x 36-3/4″ CONDITION: Good 9-94937 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 324

Have a similar item you want to sell?

325

NANCY CHU WOO (Chinese/American, 1941-) “BY THE BEACH”.

Ink on paper Unframed Signed in script lower left and titled in pencil on verso Note: Ms. Woo has had exhibitions at several museums including the Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai, China SIZE: Image: 19-1/4″ x 27″; Overall: 26-1/2″ x 34-1/4″ CONDITION: Good 9-94936 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 325

Have a similar item you want to sell?

326
Revised: 3/19/2015

Please Note: Purchased by Dr. Wall-Apelt from the Kang Collection Korean Fine Art, NY in 2007

MIN KYOUNG-KAP (Korean, 1933-) “BIRD FANTASY”.

Mixed media on paper Housed under glass in contemporary metal frame Inscribed and dated “’93” lower right SIZE: 24″ x 28″. Overall 33″ x 38-1/2″ CONDITION: Good 9-95141 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 326

Have a similar item you want to sell?

327

NANCY CHU WOO (Chinese/American, 1941-) ABSTRACT.

Ink & gouache on paper Unframed Signed lower right in script with calligraphy Note: Ms. Woo has had exhibitions at several museums including the Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai, China SIZE: Image: 46-1/2″ x 36-1/2″; Overall: 54″ x 40-1/2″ CONDITION: Good 9-94932 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 327

Have a similar item you want to sell?

328

NANCY CHU WOO (Chinese/American, 1941-) ABSTRACT WITH FIGURE.

Ink on paper Unframed Signed N Chu Woo in script with calligraphy lower right Note: Ms. Woo has had exhibitions at several museums including the Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai, China SIZE: Image: 46-1/2″ x 33″; Overall: 54″ x 40-1/4″ CONDITION: Good 9-94931 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 328

Have a similar item you want to sell?

329

NANCY CHU WOO (Chinese/American, 1941-) ABSTRACT.

Ink & gouache on paper Unframed Signed in script lower right Note: Ms. Woo has had exhibitions at several museums including the Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai, China SIZE: Image: 46-1/2″ x 33″; Overall: 54″ x 40-1/4″ CONDITION: Good 9-94930 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 329

Have a similar item you want to sell?

330

PAMELA SUMNER (American/Japanese, 20th/21st century) CHAIRS.

Ink on paper (vertical triptych) Housed in a thin, modern black frame Signed lower right SIZE: 72″ x 5-1/2″. Overall 74″ x 8-1/4″. CONDITION: Good 9-95057 (300-500) – Lot 330

Have a similar item you want to sell?

331

LARGE FOLDING SIX-PANEL SCREEN.

20th century, Korea. Paint on paper panels. Signed. SIZE: 67″ h; 146″ l. CONDITION: Generally light wear overall with deterioration to paper along panel sides, notably between panels one and two in area of herons on ground. Cracked and stained, some areas of overpainting, losses along edges where screens fold. 9-95523 (300-500) – Lot 331

Have a similar item you want to sell?

333

UNSIGNED (20th Century) HONORING THE CHOSEN ONE.

Print of an 8th or 9th century scroll Housed in a 20th Century frame Unsigned SIZE: Image: 13-1/2″ x 46″ 1/2″; Overall: 21″ x 53-1/2″ CONDITION: Very good 9-95134 (200-300) – Lot 333

Have a similar item you want to sell?

334

PAIR OF ALBUM LEAVES.

18th century, China. “Blue and green” style paintings on silk. Scenes of palaces with various figures. Framed and glazed. SIZE: 12-1/2″ x 9-1/2″. CONDITION: Old repairs, stains, glued down; small areas of loss. 9-95492 (300-500) – Lot 334

Have a similar item you want to sell?

335

ELEVEN FIGURAL ARCHAIC JADES.

1) Jade seal in the form of a winged bear. Yuan Period (1279-1368), China. Of rectangular form. Finial in the form of a winged single horn dragon. Gray green stone with dark brown markings. No seal impression. 2) Jade carving of a female bear. Probably Han period, China. Standing figure. Translucent yellow green stone. 3) Jade study of a mouse. Possibly Sung period (960-1279), China. Translucent pale green white stone with small areas of yellow. 4) Jade carving of a grooming horse. Han style and probably of the period. China. Calcified grey green stone. 5) Jade seal. Han style but probably 18th century, China. Figure of a standing winged bear. No seal impression. Amber colored stone with red markings. 6) Jade carving study of a pig with three piglets. Probably Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), China. Gray-brown stone with russet and red markings. 7) Jade study of a tiger. Possibly Han period, China. Much calcification and eroded gray-green stone. 8) Jade mythical animal. Sung Period (960-1278), China. Gray stone with brown markings. 9) Jade buffalo. Shang style and possibly of the period. Reclining stylized animal with scroll motifs on the body. Brown green color. Heavily eroded surface. 10) Archaic jade pendant in the form of a frog. Han Period (2nd BC-2nd AD), China. Carved greenish white jade with large areas of calcification. 11) Jade pendant of reclining ram. Yuan Period (1279-1368), China. Yellow-white stone. Study depicted with a branch of lingzhi. SIZE: 1) 1-1/2″ x 1-3/4″. 2) 2-1/4 l. 3) 1-3/4″ l. 4) 2-1/4″ x 1-3/4″. 5) 2-3/4″. 6) 2-1/4″ x 1-1/2″. 7) 2-1/4″ x 1-1/2″. 8) 2-1/4″ l x 1-3/4″ h. 9) 2-1/4″ l. 10) 2-1/4″ l x 1-3/4″ w. 11)1-3/4″ l. CONDITION: All very good with typical age wear. 9-95222, 9-95224, 95231, 95236, 95255, 95286, 95295, 95305, 95311, 95327, 95343, 95345 (2,500-4,000) – Lot 335

Have a similar item you want to sell?

336

TWO GILT BRONZE SEALS AND ONE HARDSTONE SEAL.

1) T’ang Period (618-920), China. Heavy gilt surface. Finial in the form of a squirrel. Seal intact. 2) T’ang Period (618-920). Heavily gilt surface. Finial in the form of a tortoise. Seal intact. 3) Early 20th century, China. Square form with a kylin finial. Sides with tao tieh masks. Impression intact. Olive brown colored stone. SIZE: 1) 1-1/2″ h. 2) 1-1/2″ h. 3) 3-1/2″ h x 3″ square. CONDITION: 1) Corroded verdigris surface. 2) Corroded verdigris surface. 3) One foot with slice missing. 9-95413, 9-95414, 9-95472 (400-600) – Lot 336

Have a similar item you want to sell?

339

SEAL BOX.

19th century, China. Bracket base, domed top. Brass mounts. Surface decorated with dark brown lacquer and chrysanthemum flowers. SIZE: 9″ x 6″ x 6″. CONDITION: With chips and losses to lacquer overall. Otherwise good. 9-95494 (300-500) – Lot 339

Have a similar item you want to sell?

340

MUGHAL STYLE CARVED JADE DISH.

19th century, China. Carving of a scallop shell. Highly translucent gray color with brown and black inclusions. SIZE: 7-1/4″ x 5-1/2″. CONDITION: Fissures and veins along one edge of shell, one side restored, otherwise good. 9-95464 (400-600) – Lot 340

Have a similar item you want to sell?

341

THREE JADE GARMENT HOOKS.

1) 19th century, China. Dark gray with russet markings. Carved as a horse’s head and a monkey for the rhesus “to become a high official instantly”. 2) Han style and possibly of the period, China. Circle of grain pattern on the body. Calcified gray green stone. 3) Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Chicken bone white stone carved with a dragon’s head and lingzhi in relief. SIZE: 1) 4-1/4″ l. 2) 2-1/4″ l. 3) 3″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 3) Hairlines to the body. 9-95148, 95302, 95368 (800-1,200) – Lot 341

Have a similar item you want to sell?

342

FOUR CARVED JADE PENDANTS.

1) Depicts a standing owl. Possibly Shang period, China. Figure highly stylized. Stone of a grey green color. 2) Earring. Han style, China. Cylindrical form with bowstring marks. Chicken bone white stone. 3) Archer’s ring. Possibly Han period, China. Cylindrical with one beveled side and a lateral notch. Surface carved with a tao tieh mask with 2 drilled holes. Yellow brown stone. 4) Silkworm. Probably Han period, China. Pale green jade with areas of calcification. SIZE: 1) 2-1/4″ l. 2) 2″ l. 3) 1-1/2″ x 1-1/8″ d. 4) 2-1/4″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95223, 95230, 95336, 95338 (800-1,200) – Lot 342

Have a similar item you want to sell?

343

FOUR JADE PENDANTS.

1) Depicting a fish in Neolithic style and probably of the period, China. Carved in the round with birds engraved on the surface. Gray-green stone heavily eroded and weathered. 2) Depicting a crested bird. Han style and possibly of the period, China. Carved with a single hole. Olive green stone with traces of ochre. 3) Oblong pendant. Warring states (4-2nd BC), China. With rounded ends carved as buffalo heads with a central human face. Single piercing through the middle. Brown stone with lighter gray markings. 4) Han style and possibly of the period, China. Bar shaped with a dragon projection and a phoenix finial. Yellow color with calcification. SIZE: 1) 2-1/2″. 2) 3″. 3) 1-7/8″ x 3/4″. 4) 2-3/4″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95237, 95279, 95292, 95349 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 343

Have a similar item you want to sell?

344

TWO JADE PENDANTS DEPICTING MONKEYS.

1) Probably Sung period (960-1279). Monkey depicted playing with a shoe. Pure white stone with russet markings. 2) 18th century, China. Pure white highly translucent stone with an area of apricot color. SIZE: 1) 1-1/2″ d. 2) 1-3/4″. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95241, 95299 (800-1,200) – Lot 344

Have a similar item you want to sell?

345

THREE JADE DRAGON PENDANTS.

1) Warring states style and possibly of the period, China. Figures on a shield shaped ground. Stone of a gray green color with calcification. 2) Han style and possibly of the period, China. With single horned chih lung finials. Gray stone with eroded surfaces. 3) Probably Han Period, China. Bar shaped with a chih lung in relief. Reverse with tao masks and comma scrolling. Stone of an olive green color with areas of calcification. SIZE: 1) 2-1/2″ x 1-5/8″. 2) 2-1/4″ x 1-1/4″. 3) 3-1/2″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95272, 95304, 95309 (800-1,200) – Lot 345

Have a similar item you want to sell?

346

TWO JADES DEPICTING DRAGONS.

1) Han style, China. Carved and pierced rectangular form with a dragon and a four character inscription. Amber colored stone. 2) Possibly Chou period, China. Stone of a brown-green color with an area of deep amber. SIZE: 1) 2-1/8″ x 1-1/4″. 2) 2″ l. CONDITION: Very good with typical age wear. 9-95290, 9-95353 (800-1,200) – Lot 346

Have a similar item you want to sell?

347

FOUR JADE PENDANTS.

1) Warring states style and possibly of the period, China. Carved with a tao tieh mask and a pair of chih lung. Tan colored stone that is entirely calcified. 2) Depicts a crested bird of prey. Shang style and possibly of the period, China. With archaic scrolling. Calcified yellow jade. 3) Triangular shape. Han style and possibly of the period, China. Carved with a tiger’s face and scrolling reverse with a bearded dragon. Gray-white stone with red and russet markings. 4) Tao Tieh mask. Han Period (2nd BC-2nd AD), China. Yellow white stone with a banded corner of calcification. SIZE: 1)2-1/2″ x 2″. 2) 2-1/2″ x 2″. 3) 2-3/4″ x 2″. 4) 3-1/4″ x 2″. CONDITION: Overall very good with typical age wear. 1) Truncated projection at the bottom. 4) Surface considerably worn. 9-95259, 95284, 95285, 95326 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 347

Have a similar item you want to sell?

348

JADE WATER BUFFALO.

20th century, China. Reclining study. Stone of a yellow pale green color. SIZE: 18″ l. CONDITION: Numerous cracks and natural fissures. 9-95032 (3,000-5,000) – Lot 348

Have a similar item you want to sell?

349

LARGE JADE CARVING OF A MOUNTAIN.

20th century, China. Forest green color jade with lighter areas. Carved as a mountain with a tiger and a dragon in the clouds. Accompanied by a fitted hard wood stand. SIZE: 25″ x 26″. CONDITION: Numerous natural fissures, highly polished surface, otherwise very good. 9-95154 (4,000-6,000) – Lot 349

Have a similar item you want to sell?

350

TEN JADE FIGURAL PENDANTS.

1) Probably Han period, China. Figure riding a tiger. Gray stone with brown markings. 2) Probably Han period, China. Figure in embroidered robes holding a tiger. Tan colored stone. 3) Possibly Han period, China. Olive green stone with an area of red. 4) Han style, probably 19th century, China. Stone of a green color with heavy calcification. 5) Han style, China. Heavily calcified and eroded green stone. 6) Neolithic style and possibly of the period, China. Stone of a much calcified pale green color. 7) Possibly Han period, China. Brown and olive green stone. 8) Ming Period (1368-1644), China. Figure depicted holding a memorandum table. Tan colored stone. 9) Han style and possibly of the period, China. Figure of a standing central Asian tradesman. Gray colored stone. 10) Hand Period (2nd BC-2nd AD), China. Carved in the round as an official in court finery. Stone of an olive green and brown color with a much weathered surface. SIZE: 1) 2″ x 1-1/2″. 2) 2″ l. 3) 2-1/2″. 4) 2-1/4″ x 2″. 5) 3-3/4″ l. 6) 3″ x 1-3/4″. 7) 1-3/4″. 8) 5″ h x 1-3/4″ d. 9) 2″ l. 10) 4″ l. CONDITION: Generally very good with typical age wear. 8) With natural fissures 9-95225, 95228, 95229, 95261, 95269, 95280, 95294, 95317, 95319, 95333 (2,000-3,000) – Lot 350

Have a similar item you want to sell?

351

JADE CARVING OF A DUCK.

19th/20th century, China. Duck and a duckling with a water plant. Gray stone with slight russet markings. SIZE: 5-1/2″ x 4″. CONDITION: Very minor roughness along leaf. 9-95532 (300-500) – Lot 351

Have a similar item you want to sell?

352

PARCEL GILT AND SILVER RHINOCEROS FORM WATER DROPPER.

Early 20th century, China. Parcel gilt silver image with gilded archaic scrolling and inset with turquoise eyes. SIZE: 8″ x 5″. CONDITION: Very good with old surface. 9-95439 (300-500) – Lot 352

Have a similar item you want to sell?

353

PAIR OF SILVER MYTHICAL BEAST FORM LAMPS.

Early 20th century, Tibet or Mongolia. Repousse silver lamps in the form of mythical animals with cups in their mouths. Surfaces inset with cabochons of coral and turquoise. SIZE: 6-5/8″ l. CONDITION: Generally good. 9-95159 (600-800) – Lot 353

Have a similar item you want to sell?

354

TWO HARDSTONE INLAID BRONZE BUCKLES.

19th century, China. Gilt metal inset with glass, aquamarines, jade and rose quartz. SIZE: Each about 3″ l. CONDITION: One buckle slightly bent. 9-95459 (300-500) – Lot 354

Have a similar item you want to sell?

355

ASSORTMENT OF TEXTILES INCLUDING DOLL & SHOES.

19th, early 20th century, China. Including hats, shoes and purses. Embroidered and inset with faux jewels. Along with a pair of black leather shoes and a doll depicting a woman with a painted face. SIZE: Hats range from 7″ w to 14″ w, doll is 10-1/2″ h. CONDITION: Generally good with wear & losses. 9-94971, 9-94972, 9-95526 (300-500) – Lot 355

Have a similar item you want to sell?

356

TWO WOMEN’S HEADDRESSES.

19th century, China. Metal frames covered in Kingfisher feathers and designs of dragons, phoenixes, bats, insets and foliage with semi-precious stone inlays and cloth tassels. SIZE: 6″ dia, 11″ across. CONDITION: Losses and bent elements. 9-95185 (300-500) – Lot 356

Have a similar item you want to sell?

357

HARDSTONE INLAY MONASTIC HAT.

20th century, Tibet or Bhutan. Textile with beads of glass, coral, agate, turquoise and base silver. SIZE: 9-1/4″ dia x 7-1/4″ h. CONDITION: Very good, dirty, beadwork intact. 9-95121 (1,000-1,500) – Lot 357

Have a similar item you want to sell?

358

JADE AND HARDSTONE INLAY WOMEN’S SILK COLLAR.

19th century, China. Woman’s jeweled collar. Black and green silk with applied sown on jewels of jade, coral, amber, silver and carnelian with Kingfisher feathers. Contained in a demilune lacquered pigskin box with brass mounts. SIZE: Approx. 26″ x 12″. PROVENANCE: Christie’s. CONDITION: Losses to inset stones. 9-95147 (2,000-4,000) – Lot 358

Have a similar item you want to sell?

359

THREE PIECES OF WOMEN’S JEWELRY.

19th century, China. Hair ornament. Gilt metal set with emerald green jade. Together with a pair of circular ornaments set with Kingfisher feathers, jade and rose quartz. SIZE: Hair ornament: 8″ l. Pins: 3″ dia. CONDITION: Minor losses to enamel and cabochons. Otherwise good. 9-95460 (300-500) – Lot 359

Have a similar item you want to sell?