2-Day Winter Antiques & Fine Art Auction
Pre-sale Low Estimate $2.3 Million
Realized Over $4 Million!!!

Auction: February 4 & 5, 2010

Preview: February 3, 2010

Please Note: All prices include the hammer price plus the buyer’s premium, which is paid by the buyer as part of the purchase price. The prices noted here after the auction are considered unofficial and do not become official until after the 46th day.

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Image Lot
Price
Description
1033
Revised: 2/4/2010

Correct: This piece is NOT signed and is attributed to the artist.

JONATHAN HOTZ (American, 20th/21st Century) OVERLOOKING GLOUCESTER HARBOR. Oil on canvas winter scene of Gloucester Harbor in winter looking through a tree onto snow covered buildings and colorful water. Signed lower left. Housed in a partial gilt molded wood frame. SIZE: 20″ x 16″. CONDITION: Very good. 9-98105 (1,000-1,500)

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1040
Revised: 2/3/2010

Additional Information: Accompanying the painting is a copy of the book “Gruppe on Painting”.

EMILE A. GRUPPE (American, 1896-1978) SUNLIT WOODS. Oil on canvas scene shows an early fall woodland scene with colorful trees and leaf strewn wood forest floor. Bright sunlight brightens the impressionistic view. Signed lower right. Housed in a fine gilt replacement frame. SIZE: 25″ X 30″. CONDITION: Relined, cleaned with minor inpainting. Otherwise very good. 9-98271 (7,000-9,000)

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1118
Revised: 2/3/2010

Correction: This is St. Patrick’s Cathedral, not Trinity as indicated.

GUY CARLETON WIGGINS (American, 1883-1962) “MID TOWN FIFTH AVENUE, WINTER”. Oil on canvas New York city scene shows Fifth Avenue with colorful cars and buses with heavy snow and people walking near buildings, some with umbrellas. The multi-story buildings are seen flying American flags and the twin steeples of Trinity Church can be seen through the snow. Signed lower left “Guy Wiggins NA”. Titled and signed on reverse of canvas. Housed in a fine gilt molded wood replacement frame. SIZE: 18″ x 12″. CONDITION: Very good. 9-97884 (30,000-50,000)

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1157
Revised: 2/3/2010

Additional Information: We have been told by a source that Major Robert McGregor was a direct descendent (great grandson) of Rob Roy.

SIR HENRY RAEBURN R.A. (British, 1756-1823) PORTRAIT OF “MAJOR ROBERT MCGREGOR”. Oil on canvas three quarter portrait of a military officer dressed in red waist coat with black lapels, white shirt and pants. A sword scabbard is attached to his belt and his gloved hand holds his black hat and sword while his other hand is held at waist. Green to brown background. Housed in a large gilt molded wood antique frame. Two Newhouse Gallery labels affixed to cardboard back with title, artist, etc. Appears to be unsigned. Paper on the reverse states “Major Robert McGregor in the Honorable East India Co. service was Secretary and Persian Interpreter in the field, fell at the Battle of Deli, 11 September, 1803. In uniform, holding his sword and hat in his hand. The owner of this picture was a descendant of the person represents, and the picture has never been out of the family. Raeburn received 200 pounds for painting it, and was a friend who used to visit the family at Portobello, where McGregor lived. The picture came from Norman McGregor, who until recently was living at Taunton. Probably the portrait was not known to Sir Walter Armstrong when he made his book on Raeburn as it has never been out of the possession of the family”. NOTE: Listed and illustrated in James Grieg’s Book on Raeburn confirming this painting to be by Sir Henry Raeburn. Our research indicates that a painting of this name was sold at Christies, London in 1907. Raeburn is most known for his portraits and the most recognized for “The Skating Minister”. SIZE: 49-1/2″ x 39-1/2″ . PROVENANCE: Newhouse Galleries, New York; Prominent New Jersey home. CONDITION: Relined, some inpainting. Very good. 9-98282 (18,000-25,000)

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1283
Revised: 2/3/2010

Additional Information: Craquelure and one small canvas patch to reverse.

OTTO CARL KNATHS (American, 1891-1971) “HALF REMEMBERED”. Oil on canvas abstract in colors of green, black and white. Housed in its original painted wood frame with painted liner. Title written on stretcher and dated “7.15.50”. Signed lower left. SIZE: 24″ x 34″. CONDITION: Very good. 9-96322 (3,000-5,000)

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2000
Revised: 2/3/2010

Additional Information: Also accompanying this lot is a letter from the Mt. Vernon Ladies Association dated August 31, 1956 which indicates in the Athenaeum Catalog that Washington subscribed for two sets and in a letter to Clement Biddle, August 14, 1797 he speaks of having given away one set in boards and wishes the other bound for him.

AFFIXED ON THE INNER LABEL A HANDWRITTEN PLATE IN PERIOD INK SCRIPT “PRESENTED BY GEN. WASHINGTON TO COL. LEAR” THREE VOLUMES OF 1798 ENCYCLOPEDIAS. ENCYCLOPEDIA OR A DICTIONARY OF ARTS, SCIENCES, AND MISCELLANEOUS LITERATURE. Phila; Dobson, Vol. 17, (1798); Vol. 18 (1798) & Supplement, Vol. III (1803). With the bookplate of Col. Lear’s Son, Benjamin Lincoln Lear. Folios, bound in calf, each volume with bright and fine red and gold gilt stamped spine labels. Vol 17 & 18 in dark calf, the Supplemental Vol. in a lighter shade. Accompanied by the 9/19/1956 letter by Walter C. Densmore of the Mt. Vernon Ladies Assoc.: “We are very happy to have your confirmation of our belief that the set of American Encyclopedia must be the one given by General Washington to Tobias Lear.” In addition to this document there is another extraordinary document that further affirms conclusively the original ownerships of these encyclopedias. In the papers of Tobias Lear was an itemized handwritten inventory titled “Catalog of Books Received from Washington”. Lear lists the books by title and indicates in the right hand column how many volumes. On the first page of this multi-page inventory Lear lists encyclopedia and under volumes 21, clearly and convincingly these same volumes here that have descended from the Lear family. A copy of the original inventory sheets will be included with this lot. These books descended from the Lear family and have always been known as the Washington Encyclopedias. Please Note: There are seven additional volumes of this same encyclopedia offered later in the sale from another branch of the Lear-Decatur family. CONDITION: Small paper adhesions to front cover of Vol. 18, else very good to fine. 9-97953 (5,000-10,000)

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2009
Revised: 2/3/2010

Correction: It lists two copies of “A Narrative of British Embassy to China”. There is only one copy.

BOOKS CITED IN THE “CATALOGUE OF BOOKS RECEIVED FROM WASHINGTON”. Found in this estate and sold as Lot 2135 in this catalog. ECONOMICA: A STATISTICAL MANUAL FOR THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. City Of Washington. P for the Author, 1806. Octavo, original boards (weakly attached), water stains, occasional annotations. Tobias Lear signature. Howes B-537. WITH: THE NEW ANNUAL REGISTER, OR GENERAL REPOSITORY OF HISTORY, POLITICS, ETC. LONDON: 1780 & 1781 (two volumes), Octavo, half calf, boards loose, chips to crown and tails. Bookplate of B. L. Lear. WITH: Anderson, Aeneas, A NARRATIVE OF THE BRITISH EMBASSY TO CHINA. Basil: Tourneisen, 1795. Octavo, in the yap edged “ship’s” binding Damage to top of yap edge, else very good. WITH: a Folio English Dutch Dictionary. Amsterdam: 1735. Two volumes, small folio, full velum (quite soiled),. Some damp staining. Front free fly of the Dutch volume torn with missing piece. Each title signed/or with the book plate of Benjamin Lincoln Lear. WITH: THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. Phila: Folwell, 1796. 8vo, full calf, crown chipped, B. L. Lear bkplt. Volume II of three volumes. With the signature of THOS. HERTY, noted 18th and 19th Century American jurist. WITH: A DIGEST OF THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. Washington City, 1802. Compiled by THOMAS HERTY. Octavo, cloth over marbled boards. Four copies, mostly very good. AND six odd volumes from the aforementioned list, some with bkplt of B. L. Lear. Poor to fair condition of these six-odd volumes. One of which Fox, George. A JOURNAL, OR HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF THE LIFE, TRAVELS, ETC. London: 1709. The second part. Front board detached. WITH: THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. Phila: 1796. Volume III only of three. Foxed, missing numerous pages, and mis-numbered. WITH: THE NEW ANNUAL REGISTER, OR GENERAL REPOSITORY OF HISTORY, POLITICS, AND LITERATURE, FOR THE YEAR 1781. Anderson, Aeneas. A NARRATIVE OF THE BRITISH EMBASSY TO CHINA. Basil: Tourneisen, 1795. Octavo, in the yap edged “ship’s” binding. Damage to top of yap edge, else very good. WITH: a large English and Dutch dictionary, Amsterdam: 1735. Two volumes, small folios, full vellum (soiled). Some damp staining. Front free fly of the Dutch volume torn with missing piece. Each title signed/or with the book plate of Benjamin Lincoln Lear. CONDITION: Condition varies. 9-97998 (1,000-1,500)

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2010
Revised: 2/3/2010

Correction: Grammatical Error in the last sentence..”Two volumes, for the years 1780 & 1781″ is not part of this description.

BOOKS FROM THE LIBRARY OF BENJAMIN LINCOLN LEAR. LECTURAS UTILEY Y ENTRETENIDAS By Cespedes Y Monroy. Madrid: 1801. 16mo, five vellum volumes about fine. Well illustrated with numerous engravings. WITH: AVENTURAS DE GIL BLAS. Madrid: 1805. 16mo, full leather (soiled and dog-eared) with numerous steel engravings. In Spanish, complete in five volumes. WITH: THE PHILOSOPHICAL WORKS OF HENRY ST. JOHN (Lord Viscount Bolingbroke). London: 1754. Complete in five volumes, 8vo, very dry full leather with chipped crowns, but tight. Damage to spine labels. Also with the ownership signatures John Hewitt of “Washington City”. WITH: A Spanish-French dictionary published in Leon in 1803, Volume II only. About very good in full leather binding. WITH: GARDENERS KALENDAR. Missing the title page. Likely an early 19th Century edition. Half calf, weak hinges, chipped head and crowns, but still tight. Minor water stains. Two volumes, for the years 1780, and 1781. Together 17 volumes all with the bookplate of Benjamin Lincoln Lear. CONDITION: As noted. 9-97994 (1,000-1,250)

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2032
Revised: 2/1/2010

Additional Information: This information provided to us by the Maryland State Archives: Click Here to View (6MB pdf file)

EXTRAORDINARILY RARE AND HISTORICALLY IMPORTANT BATTLE OF YORKTOWN MAP EXECUTED BY JEAN BAPTISTE GOUVION ON OR ABOUT OCTOBER 29, 1781. There can be no military battle more important in the history of our nation than that of the Battle of Yorktown. As a result of the combined American and French forces under siege attach that the British were defeated and the ultimate surrender on October 19, 1781 to General George Washington. Ten days after the battle Lieutenant Colonels Jean Baptiste Gouvion prepared this detailed battle map of the siege of Yorktown. Gouvion, the son of a Royal Administrator, on January 25, 1777 was given leave of absence from his military position in France to go to America. He was one of the four French military engineers sent to American in response to a special request of the US Congress. On February 13, 1777 he was appointed Major of Engineers and on the 17 of November, 1777 was promoted to Lt. Colonel. Gouvion worked with du Portal on planning and developing the fortifications at West Point in 1780. He also built the redoubt at Verplancks Point and also took part in the historic and epic Yorktown campaign of August thru September 1781. On the 16th of November he was brevetted Colonel and later returned to France. He officially retired from the U.S. Continental Army October 10, 1783 and returned to the French military service where on June 11, 1792 during the battle of the French Revolution he was killed at Maubeuge. According to information provided to us from the National Archives in Annapolis, Maryland a copy of a facsimile of a similar map exists and resides in their collection and further information about Gouvion is documented in their text ““Washington’s Official Map of Yorktown”. They state “Gouvion’s achievements won the following long testimonial from Washington at the end of the Virginia Campaign”. “I feel the highest pleasure in rendering justice to the distinguished military talents of Lt. Colonel Gouvion and his indefatigable perseverance and the most valuable service-his decisive judgment and spirit of enterprise have been conspicuous on all occasions-particularly in the late siege of New York-where the opening of the trenches-the commencement of the second parallel-a very important lodgment in two the enemy works that were carried sword in hand, and their connection with our attacks-were committed to him-and executed under the orders with that energy and precision which constitutes the great engineer.” “As the map of Yorktown shows by the signature affixed, Gouvion was the person responsible for the content of the map, although the actual drafting was presumably the work of a draftsman in the engineer unit. The map was drawn in black ink on a sheet about 38” x 29” in a size made up of several irregular pieces of paper. According to the explanation in the lower left corner, the British works were colored in red and those are the French and American in yellow but if the red color was used no traces of it remains. On the whole the original is in fair condition, although there are several holes in the paper that effect some words in the explanation and the interrupt slightly the representation of some of the siege works on the American right. The scale of the original measures about 1-5/8” to 200 yards or about 370 feet to 1 inch or about 1..4440. (The paper is slightly displaced at the 400 yard mark from a tear). On a large scale the map embraced the entire area of the siege works around Yorktown and shows the British defenses across the river at Gloucester as well. Around Yorktown the British works are presumably based on the more complete survey that it was possible to make after the surrender. The details of the American and French works are described in explanation which give a precise description of the siege and relates the point involved to their representation on the map”.” Our, unlike the facsimile at the National Archives is in appreciably better condition. The scale of the map is somewhat smaller and our map shows only the siege side of the river. As with the facsimile it consists of three sheets of paper laid together. The depiction is meticulously done and as the original instructions state and unlike the National Archive copy, our retains the original red coloring marking the British works and the yellow coloring marking the French and American positions. To the right is a legend with details of the phases of the siege and is called “Planned Figure of the Attacks of York and Virginia but the Allied Army of the American and France Commands by his Excellency General Washington, his Excellency Le Count Rachambeau, commanding the French Army. The 28th of September the allied army arrived before York and found the enemy in the possession of the works marked “AAA”. The night of the 29 to the 30 the enemy evacuated these posts, the opening of the trenches was made from the 6th to the 7th. “BBB” the first parallel with its communications begun as above and completed the night following. The Battery’s of the parallel were commenced from the 7th to the 8th. The 9th in the afternoon, some Battery’s were able to fire and in the morning of the 10th they were all opened. The night of the 11th-12th, the second parallel with its communications “KKKK” in the direction of CD was undertaken and finished in the course of the succeeding day and night. The 13th, the battery’s of the second parallel were commended, the _? ef of the first parallel continued to fire upon the two works, “G” and “H”. The night of the 14th and 15th the two works “G” and “H” were carried, fixed in sword in hand by Baron Deviomenil Marched of Camp and Major General Marquis de Lafayette the lodgment effect and the second parallel continued as far as those works and the communications “IIII” were made. The 17th, some of the battery’s of the second parallel commenced their fire the same day Lord Cornwallis sent to offer terms. Took the enemies works are colored with red, there of the allied army with yellow. While the facsimile at the National Archives is not nearly in as good condition as this example it is larger and depicts a wider area of the terrain. Ours is approximately 24” h w 13-1/2” h. It is not known how many of these maps were made, obviously precious few. As a result of extensive research, we were unable to find any information regarding any other example in existence other than the one referenced in the National Archives. It is likely this version was either made for Washington himself because it is a well known fact that Tobias Lear was in possession and handled Washington’s private papers upon his death. It could also be that this was acquired by Tobias Lear at the time that Gouvion executed it. In any case, it is an absolutely extraordinary historic document which has unquestionably descended either from Washington’s’ or at the very least Washington’s aid de camp to present day. It is difficult to envision a more important military map in the history of warfare in this country (our catalogers are grateful to the staff of the OSHER Map Library at the University of Southern Maine, particularly Dr. Matthew Edney for directing us to source material on these maps. Even the OSHER Map Library despite the extraordinary expansive collection does not have an example of this exceedingly rare Govion map). There are indeed other maps that have been made of Yorktown long after the siege but to our knowledge and all of our research, this is the earliest and first map ever executed and also done by Lt. Colonel Gouvion who was actually there and took part in the siege itself and as such is far more important than any other maps done long after the siege. SIZE: 13-1/2″ x 24″. CONDITION: Generally very good. There are breaks on the creases of the fold and as a result the first line in the text is extremely difficult to read. Otherwise the breaks do not create a serious problem. 9-97901 (5,000-50,000)

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2050B
Revised: 2/3/2010

Additional Information: This Stephen Decatur letter is the original period “copy” of the original done by his clerk on board the Intrepid.

STEPHEN DECATUR TO COMM. PREBLE. 3pp., 4to. on board the ketch “Intrepid” at sea. Feb. 17, 1804. Concerning his authorized destruction of the Frigate “Philadelphia” in the Harbor of Tripoli on Feb. 16, 1804 “The frigate was moved within half gunshott of the Bashaw’s Castle.” About twenty of the Bashaw’s men were killed. “I inform you I had not a man killed in this affair”. An eloquent and detailed letter about this event also listing the American officer employed destroying the Philadelphia. Including James Lawrence, Joseph Barnbridge and Thomas McDonough. CONDITION: Very good condition. 9-97921 (750-1,250)

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2050G
Revised: 2/3/2010

Correction: The Decatur report is as indicated in the catalog a (period) copy and thus not in his hand.

COMMODORE EDWARD PREBLE’S LETTER RECOUNTING BURNING OF THE PHILADELPHIA ALONG WITH STEPHEN DECATUR’S ACCOUNT. Edward Preble LS 2-1/2 pp Feb 17, 1804 on the “Constitution” detailing the burning of the Philadelphia lead by Captain Decatur without losing a man but killing between twenty and thirty “Tripolines”. A vivid blow by blow recounting the dramatic end of the ship Philadelphia. Together with this letter is a copy of Stephen Decatur’s report of the same incident. CONDITION: Very good. 9-98652 (2,000-3,000)

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2086
Revised: 2/3/2010

Additional Information: The Franklin Pierce document is Secretarially signed for him.

LOT OF EIGHT VARIOUS PRESIDENTIAL SIGNED APPOINTMENTS. Joseph M. Bradford as Lieutenant dated the 14th of September 1855. There are two identical appointments both signed by Franklin Pierce, President. Appointment for Bradford as captain on the retired list in the navy dated 2nd of November 1871 signed by Ulysses S. Grant. An appointment for Bradford as Lieutenant in the navy on the 14th of September 1855. An appointment for Joseph M. Bradford as Mid-Shipman 10th of January 1840, signed by President John Tyler. Other appointments include one for Justin Dimick, Captain and Brevet Major 1st Regiment United States Artillery Mexican War, 1st day of July 1854, signed Franklin Pierce. Another for Charles C. Rogers, Captain in the navy October 1908, signed Theodore Roosevelt. Another for Stephen Decatur, Jr. appointed as an Insign in Class I USNRF on February 19, 1918. Finally, an appointment for Philip E.M. Walker, First Lieutenant of the Infantry 2nd day of March 1899, signed by President McKinley. CONDITION: Generally good on all appointments with the exception of the McKinley which has various small bug holes. 9-97942 (1,500-2,500)

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2087
Revised: 2/2/2010

IMPORTANT NOTE: In our original catalog description we indicated that family notes had indicated that this flag came from the U.S.S. Scorpion built in 1813 and used by the U.S. Navy from 1813-1814 on the Great Lakes in the War of 1812. We also noted that at least one flag expert had indicated that there were a couple of construction techniques present in the flag that implied that it could have been made a little bit later in the 19th century. Further research by our flag consultant, John Sexton, has discovered that in the history of the U.S. Navy, there have been six different vessels carrying the name of “Scorpion”; the first built in 1812 which was a block sloop used in the War of 1812 to 1814 as part of Joshua Barney’s Chesapeake Bay flotilla. The second “Scorpion” is the same one referenced in our catalog description. The third “Scorpion” was built in 1847, a bark-rigged steamer of the Mexican-American War and in commission from 1847-1848.

There were future “Scorpions”, all of which definitely are not applicable here; one was a patrol yacht and gunboat commissioned in 1898-1899 which was built far too late to have used this flag. Also a Gato-class submarine commissioned from 1942 until it was lost in 1944 – again too late to have used this flag. Finally, a skip-jack class submarine commissioned in 1960 and lost in the Cold War accident in 1968 – again too late. So of the various “Scorpion” vessels that could be considered, the only ones that could be considered are the “Scorpions” built in 1812, in 1813 (which we reference in our catalog) and in 1847.

If in fact it is the “Scorpion” built in 1847, this ship has a reasonably interesting and important history. It took part in the Mexican War; it was built in 1846 as a commercial steam ship, “S. S. Aurora” by Bishop and Simonson at New York City. The Navy purchased the Aurora” in January of 1847 for use in the Mexican War and commissioned her as the “U.S.S. Scorpion”. She saw one year of service and then in August of 1848 she was decommissioned and sold at auction. The “Scorpion” itself played an important part in helping to shape the development of the U.S. Naval fleet.

At the outbreak of the Mexican War, there was a movement within the Naval Department to transition from sailing vessels to steam vessels; one of the greatest advocates was Matthew Calbraith Perry (1794-1858), he was the younger brother of the famous Oliver Hazard Perry and Matthew, like his older brother, was an important and instrumental figure in the Navy. He had a distinguished service but also, his tremendous advocacy for steam vessels and their benefit to the Navy eventually resulted in his being referred to as the “Father of Steam Powered Fleet”. The “Scorpion”, after being acquired was immediately sent to Mexico to take part in the war. At the time of her arrival, Perry transitioned from the “U.S.S. Mississippi” which he captained to the “U.S.S. Scorpion”, which became the flagship of his squadron. He captured the Mexican city of Frontera, demonstrated against Tabasco and took part in the Tampico expedition. The primary reason for his transition from the “Mississippi” to the “Scorpion” was that the “Scorpion”, a totally steam-powered vessel was capable of doing things that a normal sailing vessel could not. In addition, its draft was very shallow and thus allowed him to travel well up the river to accomplish the various military goals that were set. The usage and ability of the steam-powered vessels by Perry and other Naval officers during the Mexican War, helped to convince the U.S. Navy to transition fully to steam power.

Commodore Perry’s distinguished career did not end with the Mexican War, however, in 1852 he embarked from Norfolk, Virginia for Japan in command of a squadron whose goal was to develop a trade treaty with Japan.

As pointed out in our earlier catalog description, because of the construction techniques it is possible that the flag was made for the “Scorpion” vessel from the War of 1812 but it also, because of a couple of characteristics in the construction of the flag, it also could possibly have been used on the third “Scorpion” built in 1847 which took part in the Mexican War. In either case, this is a most important flag and the history of the vessels that it could have come off each are distinguished and of historical significance. A truly important American Naval flag!

RARE 16-STAR AMERICAN FLAG, IDENTIFIED TO THE USS SCORPION, FROM THE WAR OF 1812. The 16-star American flag was first introduced in 1796 when Tennessee became a state. Precious few of these early flags with this star count are known today in any collections. Consists of four rows with four stars in the canton. The stars are cotton with double appliqué. The flag is totally hand sewn and made of loose wool bunting. On the hoist is inked in very old period script, “SCORPION”. A note accompanying this flag from one of the family members refers to this as the famous USS Scorpion a schooner built in 1813 in Presque Isle Lake Eerie, New York. It was launched in the spring of 1813 for service on the upper Great Lakes during the War of 1812. It was originally commanded by sailing master Stephen Champlin, first cousin of Oliver Hazard Perry. It operated with commodore Perry’s squadron on Lake Erie during the summer and fall of 1813. It participated in various notable engagements. One was in the Battle of “Put-In-Bay”, Lake Erie on September 10th, 1813, which resulted in the defeat and capture of the British fleet. Prior to that on August 14th, the Scorpion together with the Niagara and Tigress blockaded and demolished the British schooner Nancy at the mouth of Mattawasata River. The Scorpion had the distinction of firing the first and last shot in the battle. At the close of the action, she and the sloop Trippe pursued and captured the fleeing British schooner Chippeway and the sloop Little Belt. After Perry’s historic victory, the schooner assisted General William Henry Harrison’s forces operating in the Thames River area. On September 6th, 1814, the Scorpion was surprised by the British sailing the former American schooner Tigress and was captured and consequently taken into the British Navy as a four-gun schooner, the “Confiance” and supposedly was later sunk in Georgian Bay, Lake Huron. A paper note accompanies the flag, from one of the ancestors of the Decatur family which further implies that the flag came off the ship Scorpion. Judging by nearly all the facts involved here, this is indeed an important early 19th century, War of 1812 flag. The period ink inscription on the hoist “SCORPION”; the fact that it has descended through one of America’s greatest Naval families; the short note of information passed on down through by the family; the type of material used and the fact that it is entirely of handmade construction all seems to point to a conclusive assumption that this indeed was on the USS Scorpion. One flag expert however, has indicated that the manner by which it was stitched together is typical of US flags that were made a little later in the 19th century. However, since the Scorpion was captured by the British in 1814 and its name changed, and the fact that this has the name Scorpion on the hoist in period inscription would imply that this indeed was originally on the Scorpion during the War of 1812? SIZE: 34” h x 49” l. CONDITION: Flag will display very well. It does show considerable use and wear. The blue canton shows much wear and losses including one or more early repairs to holes in the canton. There is “mothing” and staining; there are a couple of splotches of what appears to be blood being of deep reddish-brown coloration. The selvage edge of the canton is totally missing. The imperfections, however are a reflection more of what one would anticipate a flag of this purported vintage might look like, having been used during a time of war. A most unusual opportunity for an early American flag with such intriguing pedigree. 9-97956 (5,000-50,000)

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2099
Revised: 2/3/2010

Additional Information: Mable Storer was married to Stephen Decatur. We have been told these were his epaulets and were given to her via Ichabod Goodwin who raised Mabel since she was one year old.

CIVIL WAR-ERA ARTILLERY EPAULETS FOR CAPTAIN OF THE THIRD ARTILLERY. These have descended through the Decatur-Storer Family however we are not sure who they belong to. This is a pair of cased artillery epaulets which date from the Civil War era. The Insignia pinned to the surface denotes the rank of Captain of the Third Artillery. Artillery insignia is among the scarcer encountered branches of service. CONDITION: Of epaulets overall is generally good however the red background has some scattered “mothing”. The right epaulet with a large area of “mothing” to the right side, otherwise generally good. The Japanned tin container in which they are stored has lost all of its exterior finish. 9-97969 (500-1,000)

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2101
Revised: 2/3/2010

Additional Information: We do not guarantee all of what Peterson said about this sword in his book nor do we guarantee where it was made. We only guarantee that it comes from the Armsden family and that it was John Storer’s sword. Also, someone has mentioned, and after close inspection we agree, the quillon has an old in period use repair.

EARLY 18TH CENTURY SILVER HILTED SMALL SWORD OF LT. COL. JOHN STORER (1694-1768). Early 18th Century silver hilted small sword inscribed “I Storer” (in the 18th-century capital Is and Js were used interchangeably). This Silver hilted sword is typical of what is seen being carried in America in its early days up to the mid 18th century. The large functional pas d’ anes denote this swords early manufacture. This exact sword is pictured and described in American Silver Mounted Swords 1700-1815, A Catalog of an Exhibition Held at the Corcoran Gallery of Art by Harold Peterson, Chief Curator of the National Park Service. This book was published in Washington, DC in 1955. Peterson attributes sword to family of Stephen Decatur and describes it as follows plate 4. “Unmarked, attributed to William Cario, Boston and Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1730-1752. Carried by Lt. Col. John Storer, 1694 — 1768. Hilt characterized by exceptionally large and functional pas d’ anes and by very fine channeling and panel decorations. Grips of wood covered first with flat strips of silver and then wound with twisted silver wire. On the blade side of the obverse counter guard is engraved the name “I Storer”. French blade, hexagonal in section and tapering evenly to the point. The original etched decorations have been largely worn away. American Silver hilted small swords with such excellent provenance are rarely offered. Lt. Col. John Storer was born in 1694. He lived in Wells, Maine and was a judge of the Superior Court there, a representative to the General Court and Colonel on the Louisburg Expedition in 1745 then Colonists, joined by British Naval Ships, captured the Louisburg Fortress in Nova Scotia. Lt. Col. John Storers personal hand written diary of his march and involvement in this expedition is another lit in this same auction. SIZE: 36 1/4″ overall, blade 29 3/4″ by 7/8″ at the hilt CONDITION: The sword is in very good condition overall as can be seen in photographs sword is complete though silver wire wrap is a bit loose and bunching. 9-97945 (3,000-5,000)

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2220
Revised: 2/3/2010

Correction: Lot 2220 is described as a single Windsor bow-back chair and is correct as cataloged. The photo incorrectly illustrated two Windsor bow-back arm chairs. (The one on the left is lot 2220 and the one on the right is lot 2219)

WINDSOR BOW-BACK ARMCHAIR IN OLD GREEN PAINT. 18th century. Having bulbous turned stretcher base and arm supports, formed scooped seat and retaining a very old (likely original) green-brown painted surface. SIZE: 15″ to top of seat; 23″ to height of back. CONDITION: Structurally sound. Paint shows much age. 9-98461 (400-700)

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2241
Revised: 2/3/2010

Correction: Condition should read: Professional repair to chair leg.

SET OF FOUR REGENCY CARVED MAHOGANY SIDE CHAIRS. Mid 19th century. The rectangular molded tablet crest above a slat carved with a leaftip patera flanked by reeded stiles with scrolled ears joined to a trapezoid overupholstered seat in a striped brocade raised on frontal tapering cylindrical ring turned legs, the rear legs backswept. SIZE: 34″ h of back. CONDITION: Cleaned and repolished surfaces, a single chair with broken proper left front leg. 9-98079 (1,000-1,600)

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2261
Revised: 2/3/2010

Additional Information: We do not purport this to be antique, it is of contemporary manufacture made to look old.

D. ALDRO (American, 20th Century) PORTRAIT OF THE FRANK HERBERT. Oil on canvas ship portrait shows the black hulled two-mast schooner in full sail sailing right to left. It flies the large ship pennant which has mis-spelled name “Prank Hbrbert” and US flag off back sail. The ship sails in a white tipped blue ocean and has eight men aboard. A similar schooner is seen off the bow along with several sails on the horizon. Signed bottom right. Housed in a modern gesso decorated frame. The painting has characteristics seen in SFM Badger ship portraits. SIZE: 24″ x 36″. CONDITION: Relined on new stretcher, extensive craquelure and surface dirt. Otherwise good. 9-98558 (2,500-4,500)

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2388
Revised: 2/3/2010

Additional Information: Separation along top seam only visible from above.

CARVED AND PAINTED 31″ LAKE TROUT BY LAWRENCE C. IRVINE, WINTHROP, ME. Signed on the reverse of its simulated oval white birch bark backboard. SIZE: 38″ x 16″. CONDITION: Very good. 9-98004 (1,000-1,500)

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2424
Revised: 2/4/2010

Correction: The works are wood, not brass as indicated.

ELI TERRY PILLAR & SCROLL SHELF CLOCK. Circa 1800. Of typical form, the mahogany case with swan’s neck cresting centering three urn form brass finials above the rectangular case flanked by mahogany colonettes, the door with clear glass upper panel and an eglomise lower panel decorated with two homes of the period within a gilt foliate border and an ivory diamond escutcheon, on a molded base with shaped scalloped apron raised on fine tapered French feet. The back of the case retains a large portion of the original paper label marked “PATENT CLOCKS / INVENTED BY / ELI TERRY”. The painted wood dial with scrolling gilt spandrels centering an Arabic numeral chapter ring, further centering a painted floral basket above time and strike apertures. We believe the brass works are original to the clock. Clock is sold with weights, pendulum bob, winder and three brass finials. SIZE: 31-1/2″ h overall x 17-1/2 w of case x 4-3/4″ d. CONDITION: The case with early, if not original, finish. Brass finials appear to be original, as is the eglomise panel. Panel with paint loss. Swan’s neck pediment with repair. Small piece of upper half round molding missing. Otherwise very good overall. 9-98377 (600-900)

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2485
Revised: 2/3/2010

Additional Information: Information provided by the Museum of Russian Icons indicated the icon depicts the Dormition of the Mother of God. The Virgin Mary is shown on her death bed with Christ above her taking her soul….depicted as an infant to heaven, the Apostles surround her.

RUSSIAN ALLEGORICAL BRONZE ICON. 19th century. This nicely enameled example depicting a group of saints and angels in mourning adoration of a deceased female figure. The plaque is headed by a title in Cyrillic. The cast bronze details highlighted with enamels in blues, greens, ivory, yellow and blue/black indigo. SIZE: 11-1/4″ x 9-5/8″. CONDITION: Very fine with original surfaces and enameling with nice patina. 9-98551 (3,000-5,000)

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2485A
Revised: 1/21/2010

Lot Added:

RUSSIAN COSSACK DAGASTAN KINDJHAL. Second quarter of the 20th Century. Silver enameled to the front side of hild and scabbard with the back side chased silver nielloed. SIZE: 15-1/2″ ” blade with two grooves on each side. CONDITION: Very good to excellent. 9-98665 (2,500-4,500)

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2499
Revised: 2/3/2010

Additional Information: It has been suggested by a well known authority that this 42″ example is a Carlton Model Salesman Sample. (Carlton was eventually bought out by Old Town Canoe)

FINE SALESMAN SAMPLE CANOE TOGETHER WITH ONE PADDLE. Early 20th century. Scale model constructed of longitudinal planks joined to closely spaced ribs covered in canvas now with a later application of green paint. The gunwales with strapping and the prow and stern covered with a copper sheath. The interior mounted with two shaped and caned seats and shaped struts. Accompanied by an associated paddle applied with a polychrome stencil of a Native American chieftain above the words “BASS LAKE MINN”. SIZE: 41-1/2″ l overall x 7-1/2″ w. CONDITION: The prow section with small damages and missing elements of ribbing. One seat with damaged caning. The green painted hull with paint chips to the canvas core. The original stenciling covered with the exception of the word “CANOE”. Otherwise very good overall. 9-97820 (4,000-8,000)

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2541
Revised: 2/3/2010

Additional Information: Center door with lifting veneers.

CENTENNIAL HEPPLEWHITE INLAID MAHOGANY SIDEBOARD. Second quarter 20th century. This American benchmade example, having rectangular top with shaped and serpentine front edge above the conforming case, fitted with a central bowfront drawer above a pair of curved cupboard doors, flanked by incurved short drawers over incurved cupboard doors, all with satinwood crossbanding. The inset corners inlaid with rondels. The case raised on six tapered legs, all with string inlay. The whole fitted with a raised brass turned gallery. SIZE: 56″ h overall, 40″ h of top, 61-1/2″ l x 26″ d. CONDITION: With good polished surfaces and rich mahogany patina. Shrinkage crack in top professionally restored. Hardware original. 9-98562 (2,000-4,000)

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2569
Revised: 1/15/2010

IMPORTANT ADDITION: The original 27″ leaf has been found and now accompanies the lot giving it a total length of 99″.

REGENCY STYLE TWO PEDESTAL MAHOGANY DINING TABLE. Mid 20th century. In two parts, each D-form section with reeded edge tilting above a ring turned standard raised on a tripod saber leg pedestal, terminating in brass capped claw foot casters. SIZE: 28-1/2″ h x 6′ l x 42″ w. CONDITION: Very good overall, retaining original surfaces. 9-97812 (3,000-5,000)

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2583
Revised: 2/3/2010

Correction: Condition should include: Deterioration to silk background as well.

FRANKFURT, GERMANY STATE FLAG. Circa 1914. Purportedly given as a gift to the captain of the Parma from the cadet crew training at the time. Two sided silk and gold thread banner with the words “DEREIN EHEM 80ER” above a cartouche embroidered with a scarlet crown and symbol on an indigo field. The opposing side with an imperial displayed eagle with gold and scarlet embroidered crowns at the corners. The borders with gold tassels, all on a beige silk ground. SIZE: 41″ x 44″. Framed 48″ x 46″. CONDITION: Overall very good. 9-98040 (800-1,200)

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2584
Revised: 2/3/2010

Correction: This is a chasuble or cope.

GOLD AND BLACK EMBROIDERED CHASUBLE. Continental, late 19th, early 20th century. The chasuble is the outermost liturgical vestment worn by clergy for the celebration of the Eucharist in Western-tradition Christian Churches that use full vestments, primarily in the Roman Catholic, Anglican and some Lutheran churches, as well as in some parts of the United Methodist Church. This fine demilune example embroidered with a dense pattern of floral vinery in gold thread on a black ground, the borders applied with gold metallic thread. The back applied with a small apron-like attachment. The neck applied with interlocking tabs joined at the throat. SIZE: Approx. 8′ 4″ w x 4′ 5″ l. CONDITION: Very good overall. 9-98633 (500-1,000)

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